Digital Piracy & Filesharing
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UN says says Digital Economy Act violates human rights - Computeractive - News

UN says says Digital Economy Act violates human rights - Computeractive - News | Digital Piracy & Filesharing | Scoop.it
The United Nations (UN) has criticised several clauses in the Digital Economy Act (DEA) that deal with punishments for illegal file sharing. The organisation said the clauses violate people's human rights and breach international law.
In a report published last week, UN Special Rapporteur Frank La Ru said he was alarmed by proposals to cut off users' access to the internet for breaching copyright, such as those laid out under the UK DEA and French Hadopi laws.
The report said: "The Special Rapporteur considers cutting off users from internet access, regardless of the justification provided, including on the grounds of violating intellectual property rights law, to be disproportionate and thus a violation of article 19, paragraph 3, of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights."


Read more: http://www.computeractive.co.uk/ca/news/2077867/digital-economy-act-violates-human-rights#ixzz1P9dSSmW0
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How Much Do Music Artists Earn Online?

How Much Do Music Artists Earn Online? | Digital Piracy & Filesharing | Scoop.it
Recently, the UK government passed The Digital Economy Act which included many, perhaps draconian, measures to combat online music piracy (including withdrawing broadband access for persistent pirates).

Much was proclaimed about how these new laws would protect musicians and artists revenue and livelihoods.
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Disconnecting File-Sharers Divides Australian MPAA, RIAA – Zeropaid | Piracy Network

Tweet The Australian Content Industry Group (ACIG), which represents the Australian Recording Industry Association, says that efforts to fight illegal...
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Bring. It. On: Google Promises to Fight the US Government... - Digital Music News

Bring. It. On: Google Promises to Fight the US Government... - Digital Music News | Digital Piracy & Filesharing | Scoop.it
As lawmakers on both sides of the Atlantic debate tough anti-piracy bills, Google is already promising a huge fight - even against the US Government. At the company's 'Big Tent' event in London on Wednesday, Google executive chairman Eric Schmidt vowed to resist any search-filtering or site-blocking laws, including mandated blocks against sites like the Pirate Bay.

That includes measures currently drafted into either the PROTECT IP (US) or Digital Economy (UK) Acts. "I would be very, very careful if I were a government about arbitrarily [implementing] simple solutions to complex problems," Schmidt warned, according to the UK-based Guardian.
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Three strikes, copyright and copytight? « Assorted Materials: Johnny Ryan

Three strikes, copyright and copytight? « Assorted Materials: Johnny Ryan | Digital Piracy & Filesharing | Scoop.it
This document presents an overview of “three strikes” measures, what they seek to achieve, the mechanisms by which they operate, and the difficulties currently experienced within the EU and beyond in their introduction. The purpose of this document is to establish whether a three strikes mechanism is applicable to illegal violent radical content online, and whether it is transferrable across the EU.
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Illegal filesharing: web blocking measures in the dock | Technology | guardian.co.uk

Illegal filesharing: web blocking measures in the dock | Technology | guardian.co.uk | Digital Piracy & Filesharing | Scoop.it
Anti-piracy measures move apace despite long delay to Digital Economy Act.
The culture secretary, Jeremy Hunt, appeared to have kicked the ball into the long grass when he asked Ofcom to review the workability of the government's controversial web blocking plans earlier this year.

In fact, measures that could put some 100 alleged illegal filesharing websites behind a new internet firewall continue to move apace.

Proposals are being mooted on two fronts: one could establish a new version of the Internet Watch Foundation (IWF) – the organisation which presently scours the net for illegal images of children, obscene adult content and "non-photographic child sexual abuse hosted in the UK" – to deal with illicit filesharing; the other would put Google and the government on a collision course.
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Music Week - Labour launches major review of music and creative sectors

Music Week - Labour launches major review of music and creative sectors | Digital Piracy & Filesharing | Scoop.it
The Labour Party has launched a creative industries policy review which the shadow culture secretary promised would help develop a strong IP culture and an alternative to Government policies he believed are threatening the sector.

Ivan Lewis told a packed policy launch that he and his team – including shadow culture minister Gloria de Piero – that the present Government risked presiding over a decline in Britain’s music and creative industries because there has been no progress on the Digital Economy Bill and cuts in arts and culture.

“There is real concern our creative industries could suffer a manufacturing-like decline,” said Lewis, who has kick started a major review of how his party will support the creative industries. “There are many things the Government has done in the first year that are not constructive (to the sector)”.

Lewis said he did welcome the recent proposal for a creative industries council, although he questioned whether it would be “meaningful on action or just another talking shop”.

The shadow culture secretary added, “Will it (the Creative Industries Council) be chaired by powerful people? Will it measure progress and be action orientated? There needs to be a focus on three or four things.”

Lewis said there is a major role for Government in enabling the growth of the creative sector and to ensure that it had the right intellectual property framework, currently being reviewed by Professor Ian Hargreaves.

“The Government has to make choices that impact on the creative industries. Government has a duty to make choices,” he said. “But if we think we can transform creative industries through Government intervention that is a mistake.”

Lewis and his team will take soundings from the music industry and other sectors, such as film, advertising, education and training, before producing an interim report at the end of June which will then be delivered to the party conference in the autumn.

However, Lewis expected this would only be the first stage of the major review with another stage – that would be strong on action – following later.

He added, “Our return to Government will depend on whether we can persuade people we have positive ideas and a compelling vision for the future of our country. Charting a credible and optimistic alternative for the future is essential if we are to re-gain the trust of the mainstream majority. We must be ambitious for our creative industries, not managing decline but ensuring Britain can play to our strengths in this new global digital age. “

The Hargreaves Review of IP was expected to report to Government at the end of this month.
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Seizing on Student's File-Sharing Case, Advocates Press for Copyright Reform - Wired Campus - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Seizing on Student's File-Sharing Case, Advocates Press for Copyright Reform - Wired Campus - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Digital Piracy & Filesharing | Scoop.it
For Joel Tenenbaum, years of battling the music industry have come down to a question of money. How much will the Boston University graduate student have to pay for illegally downloading and sharing 30 songs?

But for copyright-reform advocates, a lawsuit filed against Mr. Tenenbaum by the music industry has provided an instrument to sound alarms about a broader issue: how fear of enormous damages can chill innovation that involves even a minimal risk of copyright liability.

Those advocates, represented by lawyers from the law schools of Stanford University and the University of California at Berkeley, are now pushing the court to set a legal precedent in the Tenenbaum case that they hope would help universities, artists, and others whose experiments may stretch the boundaries of copyright law.
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Open Channel - US goes on offense against digital piracy

Open Channel - US goes on offense against digital piracy | Digital Piracy & Filesharing | Scoop.it
By Rich Gardella and Jamie Forzato, NBC News Amid growing calls for more government regulation of the Internet, the United States is conducting what it calls "a sustained law enforcement initiative aimed at counterfeiting and piracy" – an effort that...
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Apple Finally Showed The Record Labels How To Make Money From Stolen Music

Apple Finally Showed The Record Labels How To Make Money From Stolen Music | Digital Piracy & Filesharing | Scoop.it
For the record industry, iTunes Match could be as revolutionary as the iTunes Store was.
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christian campos's curator insight, February 15, 2015 9:08 PM

This is exactly what i had mentioned in another scoop concerning thinking of a way to change piracy,  and how it effects the industries. apple once again finds a way to innovate the issue. This allows record labels to finally make money off of stolen music. The itunes match will scan users librarys and allow them to get the song off itunes. only charging 25$ a year.

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The stupidity of our copyright laws is finally laid bare | Technology | The Observer

The stupidity of our copyright laws is finally laid bare | Technology | The Observer | Digital Piracy & Filesharing | Scoop.it
A fresh inquiry into the UK's intellectual property regime is surprisingly tough, intelligent and radical, writes John Naughton...

It's a measure of the ludicrousness of our intellectual property regime that some of the most mundane, commonsensical recommendations in the Hargreaves report read like great leaps forward. Take, for example, for example, the idea that henceforth none of us – or at any rate, none of us who use an iPod – should be criminals. Eh? Well, under current arrangements, if you copy music from a legally purchased CD and transfer it to your iPod, then you are, technically, breaking the law.

Then there's Hargreaves's proposal that, in future, British lawmaking on intellectual property should be "evidence-based". As opposed to what, asks the legal scholar James Boyle: "Astrology-based?" But our lawmaking in this area has been so weird that the idea that we might try rationality for a change seems genuinely radical.

Hargreaves is also very good on the thorny problem of "orphan" works – works still technically in copyright but for which no rights-holder can be traced. He wants the government to legislate to enable the licensing of these works – a commonsensical idea but one that in the insane world of IP lawyers sounds like revolutionary talk.

No doubt there will be lots of expert cavilling about this report. But overall it's a refreshingly intelligent and welcome document. I've a good mind to start a Facebook page for it – and invite Ed Miliband to click on "Like".
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Why poor countries lead the world in piracy | Technology | guardian.co.uk

Why poor countries lead the world in piracy | Technology | guardian.co.uk | Digital Piracy & Filesharing | Scoop.it
Cory Doctorow: Beating copyright infringement in the third world could be as simple as making products affordable.
The developing world has plenty of problems, but few are as important as piracy. Or rather, "piracy", by which I mean: "Trade reps from rich countries complaining loudly about copyright infringement and demanding that poor countries re-organise their domestic priorities around preventing unauthorised copying at any expense, threatening trade sanctions and worse for the recalcitrant."

Social scientist and Social Science Research Council director Joe Karaganis oversaw the production of the report Media Piracy in Emerging Economies, billed as "the first independent, large-scale study of music, film and software piracy in emerging economies, with a focus on Brazil, India, Russia, South Africa, Mexico and Bolivia". This weighty, 440-page report took 35 researchers three years to produce, and it is a careful, thoroughly documented rebuttal of practically everything you've ever heard or read about copyright infringement in the poor world.
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Music Week - Judge throws out ISPs challenge to DEA

Music Week - Judge throws out ISPs challenge to DEA | Digital Piracy & Filesharing | Scoop.it
The judge at the centre of the Judicial Review of the Digital Economy Act has dismissed charges made by two ISPs that the Act was unlawful.

In a major victory for the Government and music industry, Justice Kenneth Parker has ruled against four of the points that BT and TalkTalk raised in their arguments during last month’s court case that the Act contravened European law.

The ISPs had claimed the DEA was unlawful because it should have been notified to the EC under the Technical Standards Directive. They also suggested it contravened the E-Commerce Directive, EU directives on Data privacy and that it was not a proportionate response to illegal downloading.

These were all rejected and the judge found that the EU law points were sufficiently clear. However, Justice Parker found for the ISPs on one ground, requiring an adjustment to the draft Statutory Instrument on costs.

This will need to be redrafted so that ISPs are not charged 25% of the costs of Ofcom for their general duties under the Act (for example, writing the Code).
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The Insider: No Sell Out / No Sale – Why the audience are not blameless in the free content debate.

The Insider: No Sell Out / No Sale – Why the audience are not blameless in the free content debate. | Digital Piracy & Filesharing | Scoop.it
Amidst all the talk of a new way of selling music through brands and using advertising to make tracks free, seldom does anyone within the music industry actually ask themselves the question as to whether this is a good thing. Partly this is because the people in labels who have to make the books balance are so battered by trying to square figures that simply don’t add up and so beleaguered by the real and perceived pirating of their product that any golden goose, however unlikely its egg production, is better than none. That said, it seems that, half the time, you lot, the fans, also seem a little confused on how you want the future to be (or not to be).
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Digital Economy Act: filesharing code delayed by six months | Technology | guardian.co.uk

Digital Economy Act: filesharing code delayed by six months | Technology | guardian.co.uk | Digital Piracy & Filesharing | Scoop.it
Alleged copyright infringers could still receive warning letters next year despite high court challenge. By Josh Halliday

The government's code to clamp down on illegal filesharing will not come into force for another six months as the Digital Economy Act is held up by a high court challenge.

However, plans to send thousands of warning letters to alleged copyright infringers are still on track to begin in the first half of next year, the government said on Tuesday.

The introduction of the code, which sets out how music and film companies can take steps to identify people accused of illegal downloading, was delayed indefinitely last month after a legal challenge by two of the UK's biggest internet service providers BT and TalkTalk.

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