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Growing pains: Pfizer tackles social media

Growing pains: Pfizer tackles social media | Digital Pharma | Scoop.it
The minute we’re born, we begin to age. This was apparently the number one concern occupying respondents of a 2011 Gallup survey commissioned by pharma giant Pfizer and the finding upon which the company has based its Get Old social media campaign.

 

In a press release announcing the multi-year initiative that began last month, Pfizer tied it to the company’s larger mission of improving the health of all people at every stage of life.

 

PR platitudes aside, the initiative also marks Pfizer’s lengthening social media shadow, cast, in part, by CEO Ian Read, who has criticized the industry for being “slow to adapt” to today’s more open society. Pharma’s hesitation no doubt informs Edelman’s 2011 Trust Barometer, which found public confidence in businesses, governments, and, in a new development, NGOs slipping at a noticeable rate.

 

When that focus was narrowed to Pfizer alone, the results were no better: About 45 percent of respondents described the drugmaker as unethical and not credible. Not acceptable, according to Read.

Last week at the Business Development Institute’s (BDI) annual conference on social communications and healthcare, Caroline Roan, Pfizer vice president of corporate responsibility and reputation commented on this:

 

Having our chairman and CEO recognize the importance of trust for the company has given us permission to take more risks

“Risk,” in Roan’s characterization, defines the social media space, long a jittery landscape for pharma because, although the FDA regulates the industry’s communications around product benefits and safety, it has yet to release official social media guidelines (Draft guidelines became available in January).

As a result, pharma companies that have ventured forth in social media instead attempt to raise awareness around various diseases, advocate for patients, or blare corporate communications.

 

Is Pfizer really taking a risk?


When Robert Libbey, Pfizer’s senior director of global communications, joined Roan on the BDI stage and proudly emphasized that the Get Old site contained no content about the company’s products, and Roan said she hoped Pfizer would receive some kudos for its risk-taking, it wasn’t immediately clear what either of them were talking about.

 

Strategically-speaking, referencing Pfizer products on the site would likely turn users off and open the drugmaker up to questions about their products’ benefits and safety—exactly the kind of discussion that makes legal teams nervous.

 

Turns out Roan was referring to the campaign’s “positioning,” meaning both its subject matter (aging) and its nomenclature (Get Old). The former was, as Pfizer reports, determined by their 2011 survey and supported by the staggering number of Americans turning sixty-five daily: 10,000 per day, according to the company’s press release. Also, it's probably no coincidence that Pfizer is furiously at work on drugs that mitigate or cure Alzheimer’s. The campaign name, however, caused “a fair amount of disagreement within the company,” admitted Roan.

 

A lot of people don’t like it. Our perspective is that’s okay. We chose something in a very crowded communications space. We wanted people to pause and think about the fact that there actually is something to getting older. The alternative is not great.

Drawing chuckles from the crowd with her last comment, Roan concluded by stressing that Pfizer “wanted to demonstrate that we really are serious about this. We really do want to have a two-way dialogue.”

 

Unfortunately, Pfizer is not a great conversationalist


Take, for example, how the drugmaker began the conversation: with a directive to “Get Old,” which is (a) bossy and (b) unnecessary. We don’t have a choice. The alternative, as Roan pointed out, is grim. A more charitable (if misguided) reading is to understand the campaign name as a prompt, a way to perceive or “get” aging. If so, that vocabulary is dated, harkening back to the 1960s (or something).

 

Finally, no one suddenly “gets old,” though it may feel that way. Instead it should read “getting older” because it accurately captures the evolving, dynamic state of aging. The end result is the same: it’s an awkward, confusing name, and it’s easy to see why there was in-fighting about it.

 

On a macro-level, though, is aging a good rallying point? On the face of it, sure. As Pfizer’s chief medical officer, Dr. Freda-Lewis Hall, observed, “Each day we get older.” Each day—nay, second—we breathe. Each morning we wake—reluctantly, happily, gratefully, but still we wake. These are not choices, but molecular inevitabilities. Neither are they subjects that compel me to visit a website, type my age and gender, and then tell others how I feel about things.

 

What about the Get Old UX?


The home page asks visitors how they feel about getting old and then offers them a choice of four answers. To choose one, visitors have to enter their age and gender.

 

Once this bit of data-gathering concludes, users are then shown in jumble view stuff about aging. You can choose the grid view later, but the default is lots of color-coded, post-it style notes arranged haphazardly. Why? It’s like visiting a coworker’s messy desk and trying to find, among a bunch of stuff, the thing you were looking for.

 

Get Old’s content consists of 200 videos, 100 images, and 500 miscellaneous pieces from approximately 350 sources, according to Libbey. As promised, all of it centers around getting old. There’s a link to a New York Times article about grown women who get acne, a video of Aubrey de Grey defining ageism, a plug for Pfizer partner VNAA (Visiting Nurse Association of America), and another New York Times article about keeping Parkinson’s disease a secret.

 

And users can add their own stuff. Gary M., 43, shared his thoughts: “I feel great and I pursue life like an undergrad.” No one has responded. Is it because there’s nothing to say? “Gary, that’s awesome! I wish I had your energy,” or “Gary, why are you still at keggers and dating teenagers?”

 

Despite the 800 pieces of content at Get Old, there’s not a lot to motor a conversation forward that you couldn’t find on your own elsewhere at sites that have preexisting, robust communities. Those New York Times articles? If you decide to leave the Get Old site and read it at the original source (Pfizer gives you this choice), then why wouldn’t you comment there?

 

Pfizer is setting the bar low


Libbey told the audience that the site had 40,000+ uniques in an approximately four-week period, and Roan explained that Pfizer had set modest quantitative goals for reach (visitors, Twitter followers, Facebook likes) because they’re still learning about the social media space, which, like all good conversations, is a two-way dialogue in which each party feels heard. “We do a great job of talking about our products,” she said. “What I think we haven’t done a very good job with is actually listening.”

 

Now that’s what Pfizer should be complimented on: admitting its flaws and trying to correct them. Craving recognition for taking on the “risky” topic of growing old or for wading into the social media waters is like wanting a gold star for fixing your bed when you’re forty.

 

People can’t help aging, and 955 million users compose the Facebook social network. It’s time Pfizer stopped fearing the social media bogeyman and joined other industries and the public and the online conversations happening at all times.

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Five Technology Trends That are Shaping the Pharmaceutical Industry

Five Technology Trends That are Shaping the Pharmaceutical Industry | Digital Pharma | Scoop.it
Increased competition, health care reform, difficulty bringing new drugs to market and many other challenges face pharmaceutical companies. Technology is a fundamental component of meeting those challenges.
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Could EHR incentives draw pharma into exam room?

Could EHR incentives draw pharma into exam room? | Digital Pharma | Scoop.it
How potential alignment between drug companies and physicians, via the EHR, could extend brand reach.
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Study says CME leads to million-dollar savings

The estimated cost savings for only 10% of participants changing their practice is somewhere in the million-dollar range, according to a study.
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Building a Better App

Building a Better App | Digital Pharma | Scoop.it

Consumer health IT can dramatically impact patient care by facilitating such vital functions as medication management, remote patient monitoring, and tighter communication between patients and their care providers. The guide is particularly timely because in the next few years, health care providers will focus as never before on electronic linkages with their patients. Many hospitals and health systems have patient portals on the Internet, with access to rudimentary health record information, and perhaps the ability to e-mail physicians. Some offer mobile versions of those portals. But providers have so far been under no outside pressure to get patients to use those resources.

 

Patient-oriented health IT is officially on the national agenda through the federal “meaningful use” program, which gives billions in cash incentives to providers for using IT to improve care (and in 2015 is scheduled to start penalizing holdouts by reducing their Medicare payments). The most recent set of criteria for meaningful use, to be phased in starting in 2014, requires an active effort to link patients into the information loop. Not only do providers have to make patients’ information available to them online, they also have to show that at least 5% of the patients have accessed that information in a given year. That percentage is likely to increase with the next round of meaningful use requirements.


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The big-data revolution in US health care: Accelerating value and innovation | healthcare technology

The big-data revolution in US health care: Accelerating value and innovation | healthcare technology | Digital Pharma | Scoop.it

Big data could transform the health-care sector, but the industry must undergo fundamental changes before stakeholders can capture its full value. A big-data revolution is under way in health care.


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Rise of the Digital Doctor

Rise of the Digital Doctor | Digital Pharma | Scoop.it
With the rise of Social Media, we are seeing more and more professionals actively using different paltforms to connect and share. This infographic hig
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How personal trackers will change health care?

How personal trackers will change health care? | Digital Pharma | Scoop.it

In the privacy of their own bathrooms, people can find out whether they’re pregnant or have HIV. They can even swab for DNA to unravel their ancestry. Yet it’s difficult to answer simpler questions, like “Do I have the flu?” That’s because the most advanced diagnostic device in most medicine cabinets is a thermometer. Regularly measuring and understanding anything more complex than body temperature, such as respiratory rates and heart rhythms, is a physician’s job. So patients often go to the doctor when they don’t need to or don’t go when they should. By providing doctors with better data and patients with better decision-making tools, personal health monitors and diagnostics could break that cycle.

 

In the last few years, medical-device manufacturers have begun using miniaturized sensors and mobile phones to gather clinical information. The AliveCor and iBGStar iPhone attachments, for example, monitor heart rhythm and blood glucose, respectively. The Tinké converts heart and respiratory rates into a stress rating. And devices that gather a broader range of metrics are on the way. The Scanadu Scout, a pocket-sized Bluetooth-enabled dongle that will be available later this year, uses several kinds of sensors, including infrared, to measure blood flow, blood oxygen, electrical heart activity, temperature, and heart rate. (The company is competing for the Tricorder X PRIZE, a competition to create the first no-contact mobile diagnostic tool.)

 

The sheer volume of data produced by a network of devices like the Scanadu could be a boon for public-health workers. A person who tracks one health metric every hour will generate nearly four times the amount of data in the Library of Congress in his lifetime. Spread over several metrics and many people, the data could provide a snapshot of national or local health at any given time. Epidemiologists could use that information to spot early indicators of disease and issue alerts before the infection has a chance to spread.

 

For individuals, personal data could be paired with software-based diagnostic tools. Patients with hypertension, for example, would be alerted to pressure spikes, which could enable them to better manage their condition with diet and exercise. Scanadu is developing apps that can analyze smartphone images of user-collected blood or urine samples and detect respiratory infections. The company plans to refine its software to synthesize a data sample, diagnose common ailments, and let patients know when they’re sick enough to need a doctor. For the first time, emergencies will be emergencies, and colds will be colds—and doctors won’t be the only people who can see the difference.

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Art Jones's curator insight, March 20, 2013 1:54 PM

Faster, Easier, Less Expensive!

Thibaud Guymard's comment, March 22, 2013 3:12 AM
Indeed!
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Three groups of digital HCPs that pharmaceutical companies need to be aware of

Three groups of digital HCPs that pharmaceutical companies need to be aware of | Digital Pharma | Scoop.it

Identifying DOLs


Traditional social media monitoring approaches are now familiar to many pharmaceutical marketers and communicators. A set of keywords related to a particular topic is chosen, and used to program proprietary software to search for conversations including these keywords over a given time period. Results tend to include a large amount of noise or irrelevant mentions, as well as those by patients, HCPs and other groups of interest. For example, when searching around diabetes keywords, results such as the tweet below are often found in greater numbers than those referring to real clinical situations; the software is not capable of distinguishing between members of the public making a joke and the discussions of doctors or patients. Human analysis is then required to filter out the useful results, but the process can be imperfect, meaning that insights can be clouded or that key points and individuals can be missed.

Figure 1: A popular tweet mentioning diabetes. Does your social media monitoring tool return large volumes of similarly irrelevant results?

 

Creation Pinpoint is a new social media monitoring tool that cuts out the noise and allows those interested in the activity of HCPs to focus on the most important conversations taking place between  doctors, pharmacists and nurses. Not only does this provide a more reliable picture of how a particular brand or therapy area is being discussed by those who are active in the area, but it also allows the identification of HCPs who are particularly influential online – the DOLs. These individuals are crucial when considering how a brand or therapy area is discussed online, as their posts and other activities influence others in the online – and offline – spaces.

 

The following graphic shows the top 10 HCPs tweeting on a subset of topics related to prostate cancer. Through Creation Pinpoint, it is possible to identify specific conversations and to discover more about an individual, such as their location, Twitter profile and online influence scores. In this way, DOLs can be quickly and easily identified, and steps can be taken towards engaging with them in an appropriate and effective manner.

Figure 2: Extract from Creation Pinpoint demo dashboard – the top 10 HCPs tweeting on a subset of prostate cancer topics in the past 6 months

Figure 3: Detailed information about key HCPs is just a click away in Creation Pinpoint, enabling engagement and allowing you to improve the control you have over your brands online.

 

Three groups of HCPs you need to be aware of

Studies using Creation Pinpoint have so far identified three broad groups of HCPs active online, whose activities may be of interest to pharmaceutical companies.

Social media big hitters – these are HCPs who have embraced online media, and may have several social media accounts. They are more likely to be generalists, or involved in medical education or leadership. Any posts they make online have impact within their large sphere of influence, with potential to spread further. These individuals may not have a specialist network, however, and are therefore less likely to post online extensively on a single topicSpecialists – this group may not have such sophisticated online profiles, and may only be active on a narrow range of topics. However, their activities in that area are credible, since this is where their professional focus lies. They are more likely to have a highly relevant discussion on a particular topic areaOne-hit wonders – these individuals fall into neither group, but they are shown to have had at least one, seemingly isolated, relevant conversation. Further monitoring may show that these users go on to have further conversations on the relevant topics

 

Approaching the three groups...

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Une tablette qui diagnostique les commotions cérébrales ?

Une tablette qui diagnostique les commotions cérébrales ? | Digital Pharma | Scoop.it
Les médecins examinent les patients sur base de différents critères de coordination, mais de nombreux facteurs peuvent biaiser le diagnostic.
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European Healthcare Digital Trends

At the start of each year our US colleagues take a look at the key trends in the digital landscape and the opportunities they present in healthcare. For 2013,
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Top pharma companies in social media: whose opinion are we polling?

Top pharma companies in social media: whose opinion are we polling? | Digital Pharma | Scoop.it
An entry in the '100 Steps for Pharma' series Millions of words have been written over recent years across media channels about the relative performance of pharmaceutical companies in social enviro...
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How Pharma Companies Use Social Media

How Pharma Companies Use Social Media | Digital Pharma | Scoop.it

To many businesses and professionals, social media can seem frivolous–a place to upload photos of your dinner and your cat. But in reality, it is a powerful medium that simplifies the connection of people from all different locations. One industry that benefits greatly from this knowledge transfer is healthcare. All components–patients, doctors, healthcare professionals, pharmaceutical companies, etc.–can interact with one another and receive (hopefully) helpful information about health conditions.

 

Currently, pharmaceutical marketers implement a few social tactics, mainly with the use of forums. There are three kinds of forums: branded (sponsored and monitored by a specific brand), non-branded (usually support groups, fundraisers or information-based platforms like WebMD), and healthcare professional communities. These forums are perfect for monitoring social conversation since they are all public updates. Large amounts of information can be aggregated about people’s health conditions, viable medications for cures and the demographics of certain ailments.

 

As for social networks themselves, pharmaceutical companies can be found on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube, as well as blogs (sponsored and non-sponsored). These platforms are generally used for dispensing information about their companies, products and developing a positive brand image by promoting various philanthropy projects. In other words, there is a lot of opportunity for more engagement and creating educational communities online that benefit both the user and the company, similar to what the Mayo Clinic did with live tweet chats.

 

There is no doubt that pharma marketers are diligent about putting information out about their various medications. But just as there is a potential for doctors to utilize social media to expand upon their craft, there is potential for pharmaceutical companies to improve business efficiency while still keeping the consumer in mind. Instead of waiting for the annual conference, doctors are able to access other professionals that are innovating new ways to cure, to operate and vaccinate in real-time. Imagine pharmaceutical companies joining in this transfer of knowledge by assessing what medicines are the most popular (and those on the decline), what symptoms are cropping up in certain areas and what doctors like prescribing most.

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Mobile health “unlikely to face much regulatory scrutiny” in US – report

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) might be changing to become “more business-friendly” in how it regulates mobile health, according to an article in the Wall Street Journal.

The article features interviews with participants at the Personalized Medicine World Conference.

The FDA is one of three bodies with a hand in regulating wireless health in the US, along with the Federal Trade Commission and Federal Communications Commission.

Some executives in wireless health gripe about the level of regulation they face and claim it will inhibit the market’s growth. The FDA issued draft guidelines about regulating mobile apps back in July 2011, one of the proposals that have attracted criticism.

However, Mavis Yee, a partner at a Silicon Valley law firm called Nixon Peabody, says the agency “has little to no interest in regulating the vast majority of the 40,000 or more mobile-health applications” that are available today.

The agency only wants to regulate companies “building wireless accessories for existing medical devices, as well as those that turn a phone or tablet into a clinical medical device”, said Yee.

The vast majority of apps do not fall into this category. They relate to diet, exercise trackers, reference tools for doctors and consumers, or means for mobile access to patient records, for instance.

However, it should be noted that the FDA has yet to publish its final proposals in this area, despite the long lag since the publication of the earlier draft guidelines.

Yee also mentions a bill put before Congress by Mike Honda, the Congressman who represents Silicon Valley. The Honda bill would create a new division within the FDA called the Office of Wireless Health.

This is the kind of intervention that some in the industry do not like but Yee says the bill would also include support for entrepreneurs and investors in the form of loans and prizes that might be more to their taste.

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6 Innovative Digital Health Products That Dominated CES 2013 | Interesting business models and innovation

6 Innovative Digital Health Products That Dominated CES 2013 | Interesting business models and innovation | Digital Pharma | Scoop.it
A recap of the 6 innovative digital health products that dominated CES 2013 held in conjunction with the Digital Health Summit held in Las Vegas last week.
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With iPad push, Merck gets global right

With iPad push, Merck gets global right | Digital Pharma | Scoop.it
Merck came late to the iPad party, but the company has made up the distance by releasing a global template for details using the device.    
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89% of US physicians would recommend a health app to a patient

89% of US physicians would recommend a health app to a patient | Digital Pharma | Scoop.it

Via Andrew Spong, dbtmobile
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Dave Burianek's comment, May 15, 2014 8:45 AM
I think this is interesting.. and as we think about the whole integrated care delivery model, this data and information will play a critical part. Of those practices that Humana will own or be part of in a significant way, I believe we can make this happen. For those docs with small practices, we would need to find the right motivation to have them leverage this info. Do we offer it to them? such as ipads for usage during an office visit? we have to make it simple yet provide the best information so they could provide the best quality of care.
Scott Normandin's comment, May 16, 2014 10:24 PM
the question begs: is/are applications that make access to health care the domain of the younger generation, or as some would content, are applications an additional level of complication to our senior population. Personal experience from the lens of my parents is that "absent" a vetted and universally adopted application that supports a universal view for all, this may by perceived as the "new best new toy" and fade with time. Our seniors; albeit are digital immigrants, working their way into the development of new technologies clumsily, whereas Gen X/Y find the technology adaptable, available and importantly expendable when the next best thing comes available. What defines consumerization: speed of development and release, or the ability to support end users?
Scott Normandin's comment, May 16, 2014 10:24 PM
the question begs: is/are applications that make access to health care the domain of the younger generation, or as some would content, are applications an additional level of complication to our senior population. Personal experience from the lens of my parents is that "absent" a vetted and universally adopted application that supports a universal view for all, this may by perceived as the "new best new toy" and fade with time. Our seniors; albeit are digital immigrants, working their way into the development of new technologies clumsily, whereas Gen X/Y find the technology adaptable, available and importantly expendable when the next best thing comes available. What defines consumerization: speed of development and release, or the ability to support end users?
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Digital technologies & analytics as top strategic priority in 2013 for pharma

Digital technologies & analytics as top strategic priority in 2013 for pharma | Digital Pharma | Scoop.it
Maybe the gap between consumer packaged good marketers and pharma marketers is finally closing. According to a new Accenture Report  ”the sales and marketing models of today need to be reshaped in order to be successful in today’s “new normal.  Reducing costs, mastering multichannel marketing and improving digital effectiveness are the top strategic priorities for pharmaceutical sales and marketing executives.”

Accenture says, There is a customer engagement revolution in motion in the Life Sciences industry as it faces life in the “new normal” after the peak of the patent cliff1. The industry is in an era where targeting specific populations and improving patient outcomes is critical for specialty products and where reaching more customers in rapidly developing markets is paramount for growth. This revolution is requiring companies to rethink how they can reach patients, payers, providers and governments in both mature and emerging markets—at speed, at the right price and with the right information for each target audience. This is a significant change from the “feet on the street,” single message selling model that worked well for blockbuster drugs in mature healthcare markets.

And I think I finally found out why agency people are reporting that pharma is spending more in digital marketing. According to the report

The use of third-party service providers is a relatively common practice in the industry that will continue to increase.

...

The real challenge is can third parties really provide the best analytics and digital marketing strategy as someone who actually works within the brand team/company?  It has been my experience that too many pharma companies treat third parties as vendors and don’t always share every bit of important information. Even more important outside agencies need to understand the dynamics, including the corporate politics, within the organization.  Employees who don’t understand digital marketing and want to hold onto more “glamorous” channels like TV may fight the shift in dollars to analytics and digital marketing. Still this is great news for pharma which has a reputation of coming late to the party.


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rob halkes's curator insight, April 4, 2013 1:17 PM

Watch the experience of the blogger by this observation: "It has been my experience that too many pharma companies treat third parties as vendors and don’t always share every bit of important information.".. It resembles my own experience. Hence, indeed, using social channels for one's marketing intetnions is not easy to do: the whole company and its strategy is at stake. Not an easy thing so and one needs to make precautions!

By the way, look here for the reference to the very Accenture survey:

http://bit.ly/Y0jjWC

 

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FDA 101: A guide to the FDA for digital health entrepreneurs

Given pending mobile medical apps guidance from the FDA, Rock Health has developed a guide for digital health entrepreneurs trying to navigate the FDA process. Defintely a usefull presentation.


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Pharma gets social: world’s top pharma on Facebook

Pharma gets social: world’s top pharma on Facebook | Digital Pharma | Scoop.it
This article is about the top global pharma company’s use of the social media channel Facebook.
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Docs to pharma marketers: you're not getting it

Docs to pharma marketers: you're not getting it | Digital Pharma | Scoop.it
An ePharma Summit panel of physicians takes the sheen off new marketing initiatives by telling pharmas they find them useless.
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Pharma still not spending enough on digital

Pharma still not spending enough on digital | Digital Pharma | Scoop.it
At first the stat looks impressive; pharma is among the leaders in percentage increases in digital spending but when you look at how much they are spending on interactive they are near the bottom o...
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How the medical industry is using (and could use): Pinterest

How the medical industry is using (and could use): Pinterest | Digital Pharma | Scoop.it
The picture-driven social media tool Pinterest made Internet history by rocketing to 10 million subscribers in just under two years, and already surpasses YouTube, Google+ and LinkedIn for referral traffic.

Via Giuseppe Fattori, Pharmacomptoir / Corinne Thuderoz, Thibaud Guymard
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Homecare services for patients – a new direction for pharma?

Homecare services for patients – a new direction for pharma? | Digital Pharma | Scoop.it

Home healthcare is the fastest growing sector in the health care industry, and it is estimated that it will increase significantly in the coming years.1

Advantages to homecare include improved quality of life for the patients, reduced costs due to reduced stays in hospital and increased medication compliance.

 

Graeme Duncan is the Group Director of Strategy & Marketing at Healthcare at Home, a leading patient support organisation. They provide homecare and patient level distribution to almost 200,000 patients across Europe on a daily basis. He speaks with us on the benefits to patients of home healthcare and the benefits to the wider healthcare system.

 

Interview summary


RA: In what disease areas can homecare be applied?

GD: We currently operate across approximately 30 different disease areas, including Rheumatology, Gastroenterology, Oncology, Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension, Multiple Sclerosis, ERT, Transplant and Nutrition. This is growing all the time, particularly with the emergence of more rare and orphan conditions. These often specialised areas lend themselves very well to using homecare. Ensuring patients are able to access treatment and are supported are key benefits of homecare services. Many pharmaceutical companies looking to launch new treatments for rare and orphan conditions realise that homecare can enable them to rapidly develop robust banks of information and data on the value of their offering as well as ease market access issues.

 

RA: How can homecare services impact on the quality of life of Oncology patients, for example?

GD: In one word – SIGNIFICANTLY! There is a lot of published evidence demonstrating that patients “prefer” such services compared with traditional hospital care.

This is for a variety of reasons linked to convenience, avoiding travel and other costs, not being exposed to hospital infections and privacy benefits. However beyond patient preference there is evidence that shows patients experience less side effects and have improved quality of life as a result of homecare services. For example a study in 2009 published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, showed significant improvements in side effects in a cohort of homecare patients when compared with a cohort treated under normal hospital pathways.2

In addition, the homecare cohort had less unplanned admissions and inpatient days.

Another example was published in the British Journal of Cancer in 2005 where a study looking at breast cancer patients on Zoledronic acid and homecare had significant QOL improvements...

 

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The evidence behind mHealth gamification

The evidence behind mHealth gamification | Digital Pharma | Scoop.it
The application of gamification for patient health may have implications in the future. However, how can this be applied and with what objectives?
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