Foreign Language and Travel
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Students travel abroad to learn language and culture - The Advocate

Students travel abroad to learn language and culture - The Advocate | Foreign Language and Travel | Scoop.it
A group of Mt. Hood students went to San Isidro, Costa Rica, last winter through Mt. Hood’s study abroad program to earn Spanish credits from native speakers
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Visiting a foreign country can be beneficial to understand the customs of a country while also studying to enhance one's language ability as well.

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How to Speak Spanish : Knowing Spanish Phrases for Culture & Customs

Learn how to speak Spanish with common phrases for culture and other customs in this free language video on learning how to speak Spanish. Expert: Mixitxu Et...
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Understanding a few words of a language associated with a country one is visiting will be helpful and allow more of a well-rounded travel experience.

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What travel can teach you - solo abroad

What travel can teach you  - solo abroad | Foreign Language and Travel | Scoop.it
Being abroad teaches me always a lot of things, especially this year was pretty intense. I learned things and lessons in life that no book, website, university or any job in this world could ever teach me.
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Traveling can be very helpful in understanding different cultures and unique values that a different country may have.

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The bilingualism challenge - learning world

http://www.euronews.com/ Language can be a double edged-sword in multi-lingual societies. It is a keystone of cultural identity but can be a barrier to integ...
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Gaining multiple perspectives of the world is capable with varying languages to have a better understanding of a culture.

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Study shows that people who speak two languages have more efficient brains - Washington Post

Study shows that people who speak two languages have more efficient brains - Washington Post | Foreign Language and Travel | Scoop.it
Bilingual people can process language and perform other tasks more efficiently.
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Brain function can benefit from being more well rounded with language.

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Why Learn a New Language? - Language Learn Teach

Why Learn a New Language? - Language Learn Teach | Foreign Language and Travel | Scoop.it
There are many benefits to learning more than one language.
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Learning a new language can increase one's perspective and understanding of a culture through a different language.

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Your Kid’s Brain and Language | The Smarter Home

Your Kid’s Brain and Language | The Smarter Home | Foreign Language and Travel | Scoop.it
A kid's #brain is primed for #language learning. See the benefits associated with #learning multiple languages. http://t.co/dAdg3S5UVh
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Learning multiple languages can enhance processing of information from young to old ages. Beneficial to have various learning abilities to adapt to a different environment.

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Want to make your brain work a little faster...? Learn a second language! - The Raw Food World News

Want to make your brain work a little faster...? Learn a second language! - The Raw Food World News | Foreign Language and Travel | Scoop.it
Learning a foreign language is not the easiest thing to accomplish, however, there are many benefits to gain when you do.
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Learning a second language can benefit the overall learning ability and perspectives.

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Culture shock

Culture shock is the personal disorientation a person may feel when experiencing an unfamiliar way of life due to immigration or a visit to a new country, a ...
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Viewpoint: Don't be an ignorant American - The Baylor Lariat

Viewpoint: Don't be an ignorant American - The Baylor Lariat | Foreign Language and Travel | Scoop.it
The Baylor Lariat
Viewpoint: Don't be an ignorant American
The Baylor Lariat
The experience of visiting a foreign country has so much to offer, and yet many Americans will never leave the country.
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Study abroad program ventures to Paris, Prague, Rome - The Columbiachronicle

Study abroad program ventures to Paris, Prague, Rome - The Columbiachronicle | Foreign Language and Travel | Scoop.it
Columbia writing students will soon have the chance to earn credit for visiting Rome’s Colosseum or touring Hemingway’s Paris or the favorite Prague haunts of Milan Kundera in courses offered during J-Term and summer 2015.
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An Essay For Social Studies: Does Culture Affect Language?

Language is a means of communication. Culture is the activities of people of different nations. Both seem to be different, so what is the relationship between the two? Lets us discuss the influence of culture on language through this article.

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Students travel abroad to learn language and culture - The Advocate

Students travel abroad to learn language and culture - The Advocate | Foreign Language and Travel | Scoop.it
A group of Mt. Hood students went to San Isidro, Costa Rica, last winter through Mt. Hood’s study abroad program to earn Spanish credits from native speakers
Nashia B.'s insight:

Visiting a foreign country can be beneficial to understand the customs of a country while also studying to enhance one's language ability as well.

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What should I absolutely not do when visiting your country?

What should I absolutely not do when visiting your country? | Foreign Language and Travel | Scoop.it
Local etiquette trips up even the savviest travellers – so Quora respondents weighed in with some of the worst mistakes to make abroad.
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Along with understanding another culture when traveling abroad, it is important to respect customs to avoid being disrespectful. Although understanding the language of the country one is visiting may be beneficial, it is still important to have an open perspective to avoid culture shock individually and avoid being uninformed of the cultural norms.

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The Study Abroad Experience: Empowerment Through Travel

My Study Abroad experience in Hong Kong and all across Asia. It has forever changed my life in the most positive regard and I encourage all students, given t...
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Traveling abroad can help gain multiple perspectives of life due to cultural change. While visiting a foreign country, it is very beneficial to have knowledge of the language to communicate in order to have a well rounded experience.

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The benefits of being bilingual

The benefits of being bilingual | Foreign Language and Travel | Scoop.it
Hello! We have been so busy at University recently with The Skills Show so I apologise for the delay in this weeks' post! This week I have my second French exam which is an oral speaking one. I am ...
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Being bilingual adds benefits for traveling and for personal understanding of cultural associations with language.

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For a Better Brain, Learn Another Language

For a Better Brain, Learn Another Language | Foreign Language and Travel | Scoop.it
The cognitive benefits of multilingualism
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Beneficial for the enhancement of brain function.

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Reconciling the language and empathy gap

Reconciling the language and empathy gap | Foreign Language and Travel | Scoop.it
Early in my life I learned what it was like to live in linguistic limbo—where I could understand a language that I couldn’t speak.

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Foreign Language Influences in English

Here is a list of the most common foreign language influences in English, where other languages have influenced or contributed words to English: Celtic words ar
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Americans should strive to learn a second language

Americans should strive to learn a second language | Foreign Language and Travel | Scoop.it
OPINION
Americans should strive to learn a second language


by Kathleen Keaveny
3 pm, October 8, 2014
Last updated 5 hours ago


Learning a foreign language is not the easiest task to accomplish, but there are multiple benefits in doing so. Colorado State University offers multiple foreign language courses as electives, minors and majors. If you have the time or ability, it is highly recommended to take advantage of these opportunities that may open doors to other experiences. Here are four reasons to do so:

Exposure to other cultures
A large part of learning another language is being exposed to cultures where that language originated and is spoken. This exposure comes from foreign language classes, literature and travel. Knowing a foreign language allows you to have a greater understanding of people, food, music, dance, art and so much more. Learning about and experiencing a different culture cultivates open-mindedness for other people, ideas and beliefs.

Employment opportunities
Knowing a foreign language opens many doors when it comes to employment opportunities. The first is that you can put the valuable skill of knowing a foreign language on a resume. It not only shows that you are familiar with another language, but it also displays a good work ethic, determination, connections and communication skills.

Secondly, it offers the option of working or traveling abroad. Living and working abroad would allow one to further develop their language skills as well as living in a new culture.

Lastly, speaking a second language presents opportunities to work with people of different cultures and languages within your own community, state or country. This offers the experience of becoming closer to a community as well as expanding your circle.

Travel
When a traveler knows the language of the country or region to which they are traveling, the experience gains more depth. The traveler is not only experiencing the food, art, music and popular sites, but they make a connection with the people. One of the most rewarding parts of travel is developing relationships with people who are so different but so similar to you and your culture. Being able to communicate with thousands, if not millions of new people, makes your world larger and a little less scary.

Cognitive abilities
Learning a second language, especially in childhood, has proven to develop many cognitive abilities such as creativity, critical thinking skills and a flexible mindset. Many consider learning a language as a cognitive ability and critical thinking process than a linguistic application. Learning and speaking a new language is a deliberate thinking process. Therefore, by using critical thinking to learn, the student gains retention for what they’ve processed.



Collegian Interactive News Team member Kathleen Keaveny can be reached at socialmedia@collegian.com or on Twitter @katkeaveny.
 
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About Kathleen Keaveny
Kathleen Keaveny is the Community Engagement beat for the Interactive News Team at the Rocky Mountain Collegian. She is a sophomore majoring in Journalism and Media Communications with a minor in Spanish.

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Changing student lives, near and far - Bluffton Icon

Changing student lives, near and far - Bluffton Icon | Foreign Language and Travel | Scoop.it
BLUFFTON, Ohio—Bluffton University students travel to destinations worldwide each year for transformative cross-cultural experiences.
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Science Reveals Something Surprising About People Who Speak More Than One Language

Science Reveals Something Surprising About People Who Speak More Than One Language | Foreign Language and Travel | Scoop.it
Start brushing up on your Spanish, people.

Learning more than one language isn't just good for traveling — it may actually make you better at performing tasks that aren't even related to linguistics. 

A recent study in Brain and Language by University of Washington researchers generated this somewhat surprising statistic: Bilingual people are about half a second faster at executing novel instructions, like "add 1 to x, divide y by 2, and sum the results" than their monolingual cousins. 

In short, the approximately 20% of Americans who are bilingual may tend to have better executive functioning — the network of cognitive processes involved in reasoning and problem solving, among others — than the rest of us.

The study: UW's Andrea Stocco and Chantel Prat reached this conclusion by subjecting 17 bilingual and 14 monolingual people to a battery of arithmetic problems, each comprised of a set of operations and two inputs. Pacific Standards' Nathan Collins explains the process involved:

First, participants ran through 40 practice problems using just two operation sets. Next, they went through another 40 problems, this time a mix of 20 new ones, each with a unique set of operations and inputs, and another 20 featuring the previously studied arithmetic operations, but with new inputs for x and y. Finally, the groups worked through 40 more problems, again a mix of familiar and novel, but this time, they completed them inside a fMRI brain scanner.

The good news for those of us who speak only English is that monolinguals evenly matched bilinguals on accuracy and solved the familiar problems just as quickly. But when the bilingual group was asked to complete the novel problems, they beat out the one-language crowd handily. The brain scans show that the basal ganglia, which exhibits influence on the motor system and action selection, was more active when respondents were completing the unfamiliar problems.

The researchers believe the "generalized improvements in cognitive performance" seen among the bilingual crowd indicates their brains are more easily able to adapt between various competing sets of rules, allowing them to adapt more quickly to new situations. Since learning even one language is a tremendously difficult task, Stocco and Prat believe that the process of learning an additional one has long-lasting cognitive benefits.

Other benefits of bilingualism: The study is far from the first to suggest that learning two languages has an array of other benefits for cognitive health. In the U.K.'s famous long-term Lothian Birth Cohort study, language researchers compared 1,100 monolingual 11-year-olds in 1947 to the remaining 843 of the original test subjects some 60-plus years later. 

They found that only those who had learned an additional language in the interim had noticeably improved cognitive performance. The results suggested that learning more languages trains the brain to process incoming information more efficiently, resulting in increased performance in other domains. The team also demonstrated the positive effects that follow can occur even in full-grown adults.

So for anyone who didn't bother learning another language, this newest study provides some evidence that you're not just missing out on the ability to speak to the locals on your tour of Mexico City — you're also not training your brain to work more efficiently. Fortunately, the research demonstrates that when it comes to language, it's never to late to teach an old dog new tricks.


Via Charles Tiayon
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Relation to benefits of foreign language perspectives

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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, October 4, 2014 4:21 AM

Learning more than one language isn't just good for traveling — it may actually make you better at performing tasks that aren't even related to linguistics. 

recent study in Brain and Language by University of Washington researchers generated this somewhat surprising statistic: Bilingual people are about half a second faster at executing novel instructions, like "add 1 to x, divide y by 2, and sum the results" than their monolingual cousins. 

In short, the approximately 20% of Americans who are bilingual may tend to have better executive functioning — the network of cognitive processes involved in reasoning and problem solving, among others — than the rest of us.

The study: UW's Andrea Stocco and Chantel Prat reached this conclusion by subjecting 17 bilingual and 14 monolingual people to a battery of arithmetic problems, each comprised of a set of operations and two inputs. Pacific Standards' Nathan Collins explains the process involved:

First, participants ran through 40 practice problems using just two operation sets. Next, they went through another 40 problems, this time a mix of 20 new ones, each with a unique set of operations and inputs, and another 20 featuring the previously studied arithmetic operations, but with new inputs for x and y. Finally, the groups worked through 40 more problems, again a mix of familiar and novel, but this time, they completed them inside a fMRI brain scanner.

The good news for those of us who speak only English is that monolinguals evenly matched bilinguals on accuracy and solved the familiar problems just as quickly. But when the bilingual group was asked to complete the novel problems, they beat out the one-language crowd handily. The brain scans show that the basal ganglia, which exhibits influence on the motor system and action selection, was more active when respondents were completing the unfamiliar problems.

The researchers believe the "generalized improvements in cognitive performance" seen among the bilingual crowd indicates their brains are more easily able to adapt between various competing sets of rules, allowing them to adapt more quickly to new situations. Since learning even one language is a tremendously difficult task, Stocco and Prat believe that the process of learning an additional one has long-lasting cognitive benefits.

Other benefits of bilingualism: The study is far from the first to suggest that learning two languages has an array of other benefits for cognitive health. In the U.K.'s famous long-term Lothian Birth Cohort study, language researchers compared 1,100 monolingual 11-year-olds in 1947 to the remaining 843 of the original test subjects some 60-plus years later. 

They found that only those who had learned an additional language in the interim had noticeably improved cognitive performance. The results suggested that learning more languages trains the brain to process incoming information more efficiently, resulting in increased performance in other domains. The team also demonstrated the positive effects that follow can occur even in full-grown adults.

So for anyone who didn't bother learning another language, this newest study provides some evidence that you're not just missing out on the ability to speak to the locals on your tour of Mexico City — you're also not training your brain to work more efficiently. Fortunately, the research demonstrates that when it comes to language, it's never to late to teach an old dog new tricks.