Digital Literacy in the Library
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10 Proactive Steps for Schools to Limit Student Issues With Social Media

10 Proactive Steps for Schools to Limit Student Issues With Social Media | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Kelly Walsh writes: " Combining what I learned with suggestions from the great staff at Kinry Road Elementary School, and my own personal perspective as a parent, I developed this list of approaches to help parents and educators limit incidents and issues by tackling the problem head on."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

Hmm.  Some good points here, but that graphic? I'd rather start with the positives!  I do like the idea of a peer mediation program, which would work with our PALS program. 

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Why California's New Media Literacy Law for Schools Could Backfire

Why California's New Media Literacy Law for Schools Could Backfire | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Valerie Strauss writes: "California Gov. Jerry Brown just signed into law a bill intended to promote the teaching and learning of media literacy in public schools, making it one of a handful of states that require such instruction.

The California law requires the state Department of Education to help teachers by providing resources on the subject on its website by the end of 2019. The decision of who should get this instruction and how would be left to school districts."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

Hmm, I see a big opportunity for library staff to step up! This law, which goes into effect in 2019, doesn't require school districts to provide this instruction. I think if we're not teaching digital and media literacy, we are failing our students and creating another gullible generation who share fake news stories as soon as they finish scanning the headline.

 

Sam Wineburg, the lead author of the Stanford study that showed how abysmally students did when distinguishing fact from fake on the Internet, is quoted in the article: "Forget that kids (and the rest of us) lack the patience to slog through lists of questions. There’s a larger problem. In an age of cheap templates, creating an official-looking Web page or listing a contact are features laughably easy to game. The last time a .org designation meant something was when dial-up modems were state of the art."  

 

Teaching students to read laterally, to determine who is behind the information on the page, is more important than providing a checklist that kids complete with little thinking.  And I was so happy to see the Wikipedia technique I share: mine the Wikipedia contents box for the external links, because they can be gold when looking for primary sources! 

 

It's time to throw out the acronyms (I'm looking at you, my beloved CRAB handout) and worksheets, and show students how to grapple with information using critical thinking strategies. 

 

 

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Sergei Skripal and the Russian disinformation game

Sergei Skripal and the Russian disinformation game | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Joel Gunter and Olga Robinson write: "A loosely-defined network of Russian state actors, state-controlled media, and armies of social media bots and trolls is said to work in unison to spread and amplify multiple narratives and conspiracies around cases like the Skripal poisoning. The goal is no longer to deny or disprove an official version of events, it is to flood the zone with so many competing versions that nothing seems to make sense." (Italics added)

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

A fascinating look into the Russian disinformation campaigns. In the past, a single version of disinformation was shared. Now, multiple sources provide multiple stories over multiple social media platforms. One expert observed that these campaigns mean a person who Googles for information finds so many conflicting versions of an event that they often give up searching, either accepting misinformation or just not following the story anymore. While this story focuses on the poisoning of Sergei and Yulia Skirpal, it's easy to see how the disinformation campaigns can be used to create confusion around the approaching US elections. 

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10 of the Most Useful Digital Age Skills Every Learner Needs

10 of the Most Useful Digital Age Skills Every Learner Needs | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Lee Watanabe-Crockett writes: "Digital age skills are skills for learning and for life. Here are some of the most versatile and useful ones you can encourage students to always work on."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

We work on most of these in our library. I'm not convinced middle schoolers need to brand themselves, but we do talk about how to present your authentic self online. This article includes different sites to build each of the skills, which I appreciate. I'm always telling students the skill is what's important, not the specific site they use. 

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Visual and Data Literacy Resources - Michelle Luhtula

Visual and Data Literacy Resources - Michelle Luhtula | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Resources from Michelle's 89th Edweb.net webinar.

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Mary Reilley Clark's curator insight, May 26, 12:20 PM

Another great webinar from Michelle Luhtula, this time on visual and data literacy. All the resources mentioned in the webinar are here in Michelle's Pearltree. You can watch the recorded webinar here

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Gov. Brown depicted requiring 'Arabic numbers' in satire post | The Sacramento Bee

Gov. Brown depicted requiring 'Arabic numbers' in satire post | The Sacramento Bee | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Michael McGough writes: "This week in the world of fake news, a recent satiric post criticizing California Gov. Jerry Brown for passing a fictional law made some readers laugh, angered others, and likely prompted some people to brush up on their math lingo."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

I discovered this article via The Sift, which provides a Viral Rumor Rundown full of examples for discussions on digital and media literacy. Here's a link to their archives. It's well worth subscribing to their newsletter!

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Image Searches with Chip Control!

Image Searches with Chip Control! | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Dan Russell writes: "You might have noticed... 

... that the Image search now has a set of colored rectangles just below the query area.  Here's an example with a simple query.  See those rectangles?  They're called "chips," and they modify the image query."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

I just love Dan Russell's blog! I am always learning new things to share with students. This is a quick lesson to share, but can really help students find just the right image. You can click on several of the chips to further refine your search. I searched [sunsets], then added [Eiffel Tower] and finally [clouds] to find this beautiful photo. (Of course, I first limited my search to images labeled for noncommercial reuse!)

 

It's also a lesson in how search engines change rapidly, so we all should periodically pause and look over what's new. I've seen the chips on Amazon, and coincidentally, while I was searching for a new cast iron skillet, just like Dan. 

 

So, not a life-changing thing to share, but it certainly might help students with searches, or spark some new ideas for their search query. 

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GwynethJones's curator insight, August 1, 8:56 AM

This is a great informative post about something I hadn't noticed! Learning for the win!

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The Follower Factory

The Follower Factory | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Nicholas Confessore, Gabriel J.X. Dance, Richard Harris and Mark Hansen write: "Everyone wants to be popular online. Some even pay for it. Inside social media’s black market."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

A fascinating look at bots and social media. The graphics are first-rate. This would be a great article for a deeper look at social media for high school students. 

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How smartphones hijack our minds

How smartphones hijack our minds | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Nicholas Carr writes: "So you bought that new iPhone. If you’re like the typical owner, you’ll be pulling your phone out and using it some 80 times a day, according to data Apple collects. That means you’ll be consulting the glossy little rectangle nearly 30,000 times over the coming year. Your new phone, like your old one, will become your constant companion and trusty factotum — your teacher, secretary, confessor, guru. The two of you will be inseparable."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

There is so much to digest in this article. When we think we don't need to remember facts because we have Google, are we changing the way we think? The most thought-provoking quote: "As the brain grows dependent on the technology, the research suggests, the intellect weakens."

 

This article pairs well with Cal Newport's book Deep Work and makes me want to break up with my phone--a bit. I will at least set it to silent and try to leave it out of the room when I work. 

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From Sex Object to Gritty Woman: The Evolution of Women in Stock Photos

From Sex Object to Gritty Woman: The Evolution of Women in Stock Photos | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

From Claire Cain Miller, on the image above on the left : “It really feels like an image about power, about freedom, about trusting oneself,” said Pam Grossman, director of visual trends at Getty Images. “Who cares what you even look like? Let’s focus on what you’re doing.”

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

What a great article to share with students! (I'm not too worried about the towel-clad woman in middle school.) When I choose photos for presentations to students, I am very deliberate about choosing diverse images of people. This article would be a great conversation starter for a media literacy lesson!

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Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation?

Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation? | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it
More comfortable online than out partying, post-Millennials are safer, physically, than adolescents have ever been. But they’re on the brink of a mental-health crisis.
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Reader Idea | Before Tackling Shakespeare, Students Analyze Puzzling Photos

Reader Idea | Before Tackling Shakespeare, Students Analyze Puzzling Photos | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Christa Forster writes:  "In the month leading up to our study of Shakespeare’s plays “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” and “Othello,” I use the “What’s Going On in This Picture?” activity in my ninth- and 10th-grade English classes to help prepare students to read the plays and to write the analytical papers that are the culmination of our Shakespeare unit.

The activity also prepares students to think critically and creatively about how to physically embody a character from the play to prepare for the group performance activity they’ll also do."


Via Jim Lerman
Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

What a great way to get students to analyze and think critically! Students aren't the only ones who feel uncomfortable when they interact with unfamiliar text or images. Having a strategy to analyze new material can help students move past that initial feeling of discomfort, which is where many of them give up. I love the simplified version of VTS cited here:

 

  • what is going on in this picture/text?
  • what do you see that makes you say that?
  • what more can you find?

 

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After a Frank Ocean Set, a Week of Big Sales and Copyright Questions

After a Frank Ocean Set, a Week of Big Sales and Copyright Questions | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Valeriya Safronova writes: "Frank Ocean gave a rare, intimate performance at Panorama Music Festival on Friday that enraptured his fans — and had some unexpected consequences that went far beyond music.

 

Four days later the event has raised questions around the issue of copyright in an era of viral sharing and what happens to a young, creative business when placed in the spotlight."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

An interesting view of copyright and media literacy. I like this idea from Christine Weller, an intellectual property rights attorney: ' “There’s an open question about whether a short, pithy tweet falls under copyright protection.” Her suggestion: When in doubt, reach out.' I imagine high schoolers would be more engaged in a discussion of this rather than some plagiarized term papers!

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63 Things Every Student Should Know In A Digital World

63 Things Every Student Should Know In A Digital World | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Terry Heick writes: "... in an increasingly connected and digital world, the things a student needs to know are indeed changing—fundamental human needs sometimes drastically redressed for an alien modern world. Just as salt allowed for the keeping of meats, the advent of antibiotics made deadly viruses and diseases simply inconvenient, and electricity completely altered when and where we slept and work and played, technology is again changing the kind of “stuff” a student needs to know."


Via EDTECH@UTRGV, Jim Lerman
Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

I wish we had a class in digital literacy, because these 63 points could be the bedrock of the curriculum. In the meantime, I will be sharing this list with my Library Advisory Board. I'd love to see them develop short videos for our TV news on specific topics or infographics to display in the library.

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The Disproportional Power of Anecdotes

The Disproportional Power of Anecdotes | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Shane Parrish writes: "As humans, we make decisions emotionally, and justify them rationally. And nothing helps us do both quite like the anecdote. It gives us the push we need to make the decision we want, and  data to feel good about it."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

Fascinating article with so many points I'd like Shane to expand on. I'd love to read more about the impact of WEIRD beyond polling. For example, do those poll results affect educational policy decision, even though those polled are not representative of ALL students? (And I'm going out on a very short limb and assuming that the W could stand for White as well as Western.)

 

I'd also love to read about the impact of anecdotes on health decisions. I have an acquaintance who won't wear a seat belt because her brother survived a car accident because he got thrown clear of his truck. Other people still smoke because grandpa smoked a pack a day and outlived all his nonsmoking siblings. As Shane writes, these anecdotes give us "the data to feel good about [our decisions.]" How do we confront the emotional decision making with facts? Perhaps weaving facts into anecdotes of our own? Certainly this is another example of the power of storytelling! 

 

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Can You Spot the Deceptive Facebook Post? - The New York Times

Can You Spot the Deceptive Facebook Post? - The New York Times | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Keith Collins and Sheera Frenkel write: "Facebook has been plagued with disinformation posts placed by foreign operatives. Can you tell the difference between a real post and one designed to fool you?

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

I doubt many of my middle schoolers use Facebook, but there are great examples here to show why critical thinking, finding multiple sources, and above all, not mindlessly sharing or liking things that appear in your feed are so important. I want these skills to become second nature to my students!

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On Twitter, falsehood spreads faster than truth - Social media and fake news

On Twitter, falsehood spreads faster than truth - Social media and fake news | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

"The reason false information does better than the true stuff is simple, say the researchers. Things spread through social networks because they are appealing, not because they are true. One way to make news appealing is to make it novel."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

Another insight to discuss with students. When reading news shared on social media, take time to consider: Can I find this from another reputable source? Am I sharing it because it evoked some emotion? Am I sharing it to be "first with the news?" 

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GwynethJones's curator insight, August 1, 8:50 AM

I would also add "on Facebook" to this!

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Where Countries Are Tinderboxes and Facebook Is a Match 

Where Countries Are Tinderboxes and Facebook Is a Match  | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Amanda Taub and Max Fisher write: "Time and again, communal hatreds overrun the [Facebook] newsfeed — the primary portal for news and information for many users — unchecked as local media are displaced by Facebook and governments find themselves with little leverage over the company. Some users, energized by hate speech and misinformation, plot real-world attacks.

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

This was a fascinating and disheartening article that would be a great basis for a digital literacy lesson. (Pair it with this article.) Do students understand the goal of any social media site is to get them to spend more time there? And the reason for that is for the social media company to make money? 

 

Last night I had dinner with cousins from Massachusetts. Their children, in middle and high school, talked about a school violence threat that spread via social media right after the March 14th walk-out to protest gun violence. It contained the same images as the fake threat that spread through our school district in California. I am sure that students could come up with several other examples of rumors that spread like wildfire through their social media. 

 

At the end of the Times article, which details an attack on a Muslim restaurant after a video taped there goes viral, the owner of the restaurant is quoted about his own use of Facebook: “It’s not that I have more faith that social media is accurate, but you have to spend time and money to go to the market to get a newspaper,” he said. “I can just open my phone and get the news instead.”

 

“Whether it’s wrong or right, it’s what I read.”

 

I'm curious to know how many students would nod in agreement. 

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YouTube, the Great Radicalizer - The New York Times

YouTube, the Great Radicalizer - The New York Times | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Zeynep Tufekci writes: "What we are witnessing is the computational exploitation of a natural human desire: to look “behind the curtain,” to dig deeper into something that engages us. As we click and click, we are carried along by the exciting sensation of uncovering more secrets and deeper truths. YouTube leads viewers down a rabbit hole of extremism, while Google racks up the ad sales."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

I use YouTube purely for recreational purposes--and the occasional "how do I replace [insert random broken household item]"-- but I just spent some time looking at various controversial topics. Sure enough, click on one anti-vaccination video, and all the recommended videos become anti-vaxx, even though when I did a simple [vaccination] search, the first page of videos were predominately pro-vaccination. 

 

When I teach about doing Internet research I always talk about staying focused, since it's so easy to get distracted by irrelevant sites. My example is always YouTube. I ask students to raise their hand if they've watched a YouTube video for fun. Then I ask them to raise their hand if they stopped at that one video. No one does. Now, instead of just emphasizing why that rabbit hole can cost them research time, I'll be asking students to be more aware of where that rabbit hole might take them.

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How To Teach Digital Citizenship Through Blogging

How To Teach Digital Citizenship Through Blogging | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Kathleen Morris writes: "

There are many stand-alone lessons or units of work out there. Some schools “tick the box” by covering digital citizenship in the first few weeks of the school year and then move on.

 

I believe digital citizenship education is most beneficial when it is ongoing and authentic. A blogging program offers this.

 

I also believe that digital citizenship education should begin very early on, as soon as children begin accessing the internet.

 

Blogging allows a simple awareness of digital citizenship to start being developed at any age, even in kindergarten classrooms. Then, students can progressively build on their knowledge and skills.

 

Blogging can offer not only a safe space to practice digital citizenship, but also authentic dilemmas, discussions, and interactions. And hopefully blogging is something that’s weaved into your classroom program so it’s ongoing throughout the year."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

Our 7th graders are currently blogging about a novel they've all read, using an earlier post from The Edublogger as a framework. I would love to see teachers review this post with students and get them to reflect on these topics. We have addressed most of them in standalone digital citizenship lessons or when we introduced the project, but I think this would be a perfect blog topic for students!

 

I'd love to share the infographic and ask students for their interpretations of each of the topics before giving my input. I think it's important to show students how my reflection is constantly evolving. Just this week, I saw a tweet from Jennifer LaGarde about blogging. She mentioned that she gets fewer comments on her blog, but that engagement via social media is high. So my own thoughts about communication have changed, as I am one who comments less but reacts on social media more!

 

I'd love our 7th grade teachers to continue using student blogs after the Tangerine project is over. Perhaps this post will encourage them to think of other uses!

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From the Artist Behind the Selfie Rat, Meet the Toilet Iguana

From the Artist Behind the Selfie Rat, Meet the Toilet Iguana | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Andy Newman writes: "One of the most widely viewed pieces during Miami Art Week, the annual spectacle that ended on Sunday, was not to be found at the international art fair Art Basel Miami Beach or any of the galleries around town.

It was a news story broadcast by the Spanish-language network Telemundoon its affiliate stations in Miami and Puerto Rico.

In it, a man from the Miami suburb of Hialeah goes to the bathroom and gives out a yelp. The video implies that when he sat on the toilet, he was bitten on the genitals by an iguana that crawled through the pipes.

The shaky footage shows the iguana peering out of the toilet and the man’s grandmother screaming as she chases it with a hair brush."

 
Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

What a great article to share in a media literacy lesson, although I'd start with the video and grab my students' attention. There's so much to explore here: the artist's use of myth told in modern form, how her work ..."requires the collaboration of unwitting news organizations," (and my favorite, the quote from the actor about not cluing his grandmother in to the entire farce: "Adrenaline keeps you young.")

 

Be sure to share a previous article by Newman about Zardulu. The two articles would certainly spark conversation. Is this fake news, or a new way to tell stories? I'd love to see our 6th graders use this as a jumping off point to retell Greek myths!

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How to seek truth in the era of fake news

How to seek truth in the era of fake news | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it
Known worldwide for her courage and clarity, Christiane Amanpour has spent the past three decades interviewing business, cultural and political leaders who have shaped history. In conversation with TED Curator Chris Anderson, Amanpour discusses fake news, objectivity in journalism, the leadership vacuum in global politics and more, sharing her wisdom along the way. "Be careful where you get information from," she says. "Unless we are all engaged as global citizens who appreciate the truth, who understand science, empirical evidence and facts, then we are going to be wandering around -- to a potential catastrophe."
Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

What an insightful talk from Christiane Amanpour. 

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Fake News And Scams Are Going Around About The Deadly Storm In Texas

Fake News And Scams Are Going Around About The Deadly Storm In Texas | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it
Insurance scams, rumors of water shutoffs, and fake restrictions on when people can return are all bouncing around the internet.
Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

Some current news and social media to share with students to demonstrate why we need to check our sources. Also why, if it sounds too good or too crazy to be true, you're probably right! (Just be aware there's an F-bomb in one of the tweets. I wouldn't share the entire article with students.)

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GwynethJones's curator insight, September 5, 2017 6:08 PM

So sad that this always happens when disaster strikes, SCAMS abound.

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NASA Denies That It’s Running a Child Slave Colony on Mars

NASA Denies That It’s Running a Child Slave Colony on Mars | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it
On Thursday, Alex Jones welcomed a guest to talk about how kidnapped children have been sent on a two-decade mission to space. NASA now denies the interplanetary conspiracy.
Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

OK, so this article might teeter on the edge of topics you'd feel uncomfortable discussing with middle schoolers, but there's enough here to make a great example for a media literacy lesson. The headline alone would be great a great clickbait example!

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How Filter Bubbles Distort Reality: Farnam Street

How Filter Bubbles Distort Reality: Farnam Street | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

"Many sites offer personalized content selections, based on our browsing history, age, gender, location, and other data. The result is a flood of articles and posts that support our current opinions and perspectives to ensure that we enjoy what we see. Even when a site is not offering specifically targeted content, we all tend to follow people whose views align with ours. When those people share a piece of content, we can be sure it will be something we are also interested in.

That might not sound so bad, but filter bubbles create echo chambers. We assume that everyone thinks like us, and we forget that other perspectives exist." (Emphasis added.)

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

Shane Parrish takes a deep dive into filter bubbles. I found several great quotes that I'll be using in a lesson on this topic. Some of the best:

  • I've always loved The New Yorker cartoon on internet anonymity. Parrish quotes Eli Pariser's book Filter Bubbles: "The new Internet doesn’t just know you’re a dog; it knows your breed and wants to sell you a bowl of premium kibble." What a great way to  introduce this topic to middle schoolers!
  • Another quote from Pariser: "Your computer monitor is a kind of one-way mirror, reflecting your own interests while algorithmic observers watch what you click." 
  • Also Pariser: "Your identity shapes your media. There’s just one flaw in this logic: Media also shape identity. And as a result, these services may end up creating a good fit between you and your media by changing … you."
  • Pariser again: "Personalized filters play to the most compulsive parts of you, creating “compulsive media” to get you to click things more."
  • From a study on filter bubbles and voting by Jacob N. Shapiro: "The results of these experiments demonstrate that (i) biased search rankings can shift the voting preferences of undecided voters by 20% or more, (ii) the shift can be much higher in some demographic groups, and (iii) search ranking bias can be masked so that people show no awareness of the manipulation." (emphasis added.)
  • A quote from President Obama: "And increasingly, we become so secure in our bubbles that we start accepting only information, whether it’s true or not, that fits our opinions, instead of basing our opinions on the evidence that is out there."
  • And finally, a great summary for middle schoolers from Pariser: “A world constructed from the familiar is the world in which there's nothing to learn.”
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Which Anonymous Sources Are Worth Paying Attention To?

Which Anonymous Sources Are Worth Paying Attention To? | Digital Literacy in the Library | Scoop.it

Perry Bacon Jr. writes: "In the first part of our guide to unnamed sources, we laid out some general tips for making sense of these kinds of stories. In this part, we want to get more specific, to help you to essentially decode these stories. We also want you to be able to know which stories you should rely on based on the different kinds of sourcing used.

So we’re going to divide anonymous sources into six general types and give the pros and cons of each, in terms of reliability. We ordered the types of unnamed sources, roughly speaking, from most reliable to least reliable (at least in my experience.)"

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

I'm not sure how many of my middle schoolers read news, either in a newspaper, magazine, or online (I am sure I'd be disappointed in the number!) This article would be good to share with high schoolers or middle school teachers who want to broaden their students' informational text reading. 

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