Digital History
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Augmented Reality: Creating interactive news content | RJI

Augmented Reality: Creating interactive news content | RJI | Digital History | Scoop.it
True/False Film Fest attendees speak about interacting with our augmented reality experience during the four-day event in March.

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Cool way to see more information on events using a smart phone
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How Google plans to better translate Indian languages using little or no data

How Google plans to better translate Indian languages using little or no data | Digital History | Scoop.it
Google is working on a new translation and machine learning model for languages with limited or no data sets to train the neural engines which handle artificial intelligence tasks, a top executive has said.

Barak Turovsky, head of product & design at Google Translate and Machine Learning, told Mint that Google Neural Machine Translation (GNMT) is exploring low-resource training. 

"This is particularly exciting for Indian languages, where we leveraged 'low-resource training' to overcome a severe shortage of training data," Turovsky was quoted as saying. "As a result, we achieved a pretty amazing quality improvement for Indian and other languages, and are working on expanding this approach to more languages and use cases."

Turovsky said that his unit is also looking at another method called "zero-shot translation" to train its neural networks. 

"We are now working on an approach of leveraging multilanguage training to offer translations for language pairs in which we have no training data," he said. "For example, in one (machine translation) model across English, Japanese and Korean, all our training data is between English and Japanese and (English and) Korean. But we would like to translate between Japanese and Korean, but we don’t have any training data for this language pair." 

The Google executive said that using multi-language training, GNMT can still translate between two languages, in the same manner that a human being who speaks English, Japanese and Korean, can translate between Japanese and Korean. 

"This is a very promising development, which will benefit Indian languages that generally suffer from lack of training data," Turovsky was quoted as saying.

He also said that Google has launched translations for 96 languages including 11 Indic languages in the first 18 months since the company started working on neural networks in 2016.

One of the tricky aspects of translation is jokes and idioms which mean different things in different cultures. Turovsku said that 10 million language enthusiasts from across the world have contributed more than 700 million translated words to help Google Translate improve its quality and help users better communicate in their languages.

He added that nearly 15% of all translation requirements on Google Translate's series of apps and services are catered to using the company's Translate community.

To boost its Indian language support, Google has run "Translatathons" in India, with one for Hindi in 2014 and anther for Indic languages such as Bengali, Tamil, Telegu, Marathi, Punjabi, Kannada and Malayalam in 2015.  

In a separate development, Google  has previewed its new quantum processor named Bristlecone at the annual American Physical Society meeting in Los Angeles.

"The purpose of this gate-based superconducting system is to provide a testbed for research into system error rates and scalability of our qubit technology, as well as applications in quantum simulation, optimization, and machine learning," Julian Kelly, Research Scientist, Quantum AI Lab, wrote in a blog post.

In the world of quantam computing, the common belief is that a quantam computer needs all of its chips to run at least on 49-qubits or quantam bits to achieve almost error-free results or supremacy. 

However, Bristlecone operates on chips that each have 72 qubits -- a number only seconded by IBM's 50-qubit computer in its testing lab followed by a 20-qubit offering on its cloud.

But Kelly also noted that the success of quantam PCs doesn't rely on qubits alone or its number. 

"Operating a device such as Bristlecone at low system error requires harmony between a full stack of technology ranging from software and control electronics to the processor itself. Getting this right requires careful systems engineering over several iterations," he explained.

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Pixlr blog: The Amazing Pixlr Express Re-launch!

Pixlr blog: The Amazing Pixlr Express Re-launch! | Digital History | Scoop.it

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University Of Washington - Virtual Reality Research Center

University Of Washington - Virtual Reality Research Center | Digital History | Scoop.it
I wonder, if my university had a virtual reality research Center, when I was doing my undergraduate degree, would it have changed my major? I am not sure, but VR is moving past a scientific toy or game interface, it is becoming reality. Virtual reality applications whether they are just for remote 3D viewing or …

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University of Michigan Turns Courses Into Games (EdSurge News)

University of Michigan Turns Courses Into Games (EdSurge News) | Digital History | Scoop.it
“School is a game,” says Barry Fishman, University of Michigan professor of education and information. But unlike Monopoly or Taboo, Fishman believes the plays and strategies in higher education courses are often poorly designed. He and his colleagues at U-M’s Gameful Learning Lab are working together to incorporate essential elements of well-designed games into courses.

The lab has built an LMS called GradeCraft that allows faculty to structure and deliver courses like a game. “We take what we know about design principles for good games and apply those to the learning environment and make it more engaging so that students persist in the challenge of learning,” explains lab director Rachel Niemer.

The Gameful Learning Lab is one of three, large-scale labs supported under a new enterprise at the university called Academic Innovation, currently made up of 66 initiatives “charged with developing a culture of innovation in learning” that can bring about “personalized, engaged and lifelong” learning experiences.

Via Jim Lerman, Julia Smith
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Christopher Ray's curator insight, May 20, 2:41 PM
Turing education into a game like scenario to encourage learning is nothing new, just re-imagined for the new generation. Educational P.C. games were popular when I was growing up, whether they were teaching you how to spell and how to add and subtract, by encompassing the educational lesson in a form that is inviting to students, it allows them to learn while actively participating in an activity that already excites them.
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Hands On: Assassin's Creed Origins Discovery Tour Is a Thoughtful and Interesting Addition

Hands On: Assassin's Creed Origins Discovery Tour Is a Thoughtful and Interesting Addition | Digital History | Scoop.it
And it's free -
The latest update for Assassin's Creed Origins adds a whole new game mode: th

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Julia Smith's curator insight, April 5, 9:19 PM
I think this is a great way to educate a large portion of the population! Video games are engaging, and they are a great visual tool when teaching history. I think that the discovery tour could be the start of a new genre of video games: historical reality.
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Discover Campus: using augmented reality to learn about the history of our University

Discover Campus: using augmented reality to learn about the history of our University | Digital History | Scoop.it
As part of Digital Discovery Week, myself (Pete Sparkes, Learning Technologist) and Bethany Logan (Research Support Supervisor, Library) used technology to create a series of interactive posters using augmented reality (dubbed ‘Discover Campus’) to provide bite-sized, location-based digital learning resources across campus. The use of this technology enabled us to present a historical narrative, supported by a video montage of photos from archival collections at The Keep, presenting the history of Falmer House (Students’ Union), the Library and the Arts buildings which staff, students and visitors alike could engage with through their smartphones and tablets. Click on the image below to watch a brief Youtube video demonstration of the posters in action. Through the Discover Campus project, we aimed to achieve the following: Empower staff, students and visitors to interact and engage with the history of the university in a new and unique way. Connect historical narratives to their physical locations in an easily accessible manner. Explore opportunities for promoting engagement with archival materials. Demonstrate the potential of augmented reality technology as a tool and medium for teaching and learning. You can view the content yourself by following the instructions below – if you’re not on campus then you can follow the same instructions to interact with the digitized copies of the posters that we have included below in this blog post. Instructions: Download the HP Reveal app (from Google Play or the App Store) onto either a smartphone or tablet. Open the app and follow the telsussex channel. Find a Discover Campus poster located at Falmer House, the Library, the Arts buildings (or use digital copies below) With the app open – scan the poster with your camera. If you’re feeling lazy, then you can skip the apps and posters and view the videos on the Sussex TEL Youtube channel. Discover Campus posters (click to enlarge)   What is augmented reality? Augmented Reality (AR) is a term used to describe digital technologies which enhance the experience of how we perceive real-world physical objects by overlaying and integrating it with digital content and information. This convergence of the physical world and technology has the potential to transform the way that we perceive and engage with learning. As explained by HowStuffWorks in their AR 101: The Basics of Augmented Reality video (which I would suggest watching if you’re new to AR), “a really powerful, universal AR app could turn the physical world around you into an encyclopedia, tour guide and repair manual all in one”. Examples of AR date back to 1960s, although it is only recently that technology has started to catch up with this idea. A few recent examples in popular culture include the location-based mobile game Pokemon Go and the use of masks in Snapchat, the  multimedia messaging mobile app. A number of universities have also started to embrace AR to enhance teaching and learning through interactive walks to analyse safety risks, provide access to rare-books, as a creative means for students to present information and more. Although there are already many examples, according a report from Ericsson; we are likely to start realising the full potential of AR from 2020 onwards, inline with the public roll-out of 5G which is set to introduce a new wave of mobile technology.   How did we do it? The technical concept behind the Discover Campus project was that a poster would act as a visual trigger, playing a video when scanned using a camera on a smartphone or tablet. The posters would be based on different locations around campus, so that each video would tell a snapshot story about the development, people and events behind the history of the building. The development process was split into 5 separate phases to produce each of the required elements to bring this project together. Locate and curate historic photos and source materials of University of Sussex for use in the posters the videos. Write a set of narratives and storyboards based on different locations on campus – making sure that the narratives complement the visual materials. Produce videos based on each storyboard using the materials and record a voice over for the narrative. Create a poster for each of the videos. Use the HP Reveal app to create the augmented reality experiences.   Planning and development As the content would be presented through a mix of posters and videos, it was important to have strong visual materials to base our narratives on. The Keep (archive and historical resource centre for Brighton and Sussex) includes a wealth of historic photos, articles, technical drawings and materials on the University of Sussex amongst its collections. We spent a couple of afternoons sorting and curating materials from their collections, which we whittled down to 100 items that could potentially be used for our project. With the permission of the archive, we then photographed these items as a means of digitizing the materials we wanted to use. The photos were then used as a starting point for creating three storyboards – one for each video based on the three locations. Storyboarding is a vital part of planning any video project, ensuring that there is clear direction during the production process and that it runs smoothly. Our storyboards consisted of a document containing a timeline of the photos and narrative dialogue, drawn from books within the University Library, in the order of where they would appear in the video. We then used Adobe Photoshop to produce the posters and edit the photos for our videos and Adobe Premiere (both Adobe products available to all staff and students on the University software center) to piece together the photo montage videos and record our narratives over the top. Once we had created our posters (trigger image) and videos (triggered content), we had the ingredients we needed to create our augmented reality experiences. We evaluated a few different AR apps including Unity, Vuforia, Blippar and Metaverse, but decided to use Aurasma (now called HP Reveal) due to its functionality and what we perceived as its ease of use. We ran into some issues whilst trying to create our AR experiences due to strange behaviours where the tool didn’t seem to synchronize or behave consistently between the app and web-browser versions. Eventually we had to create a completely new account and then use the app exclusively so that the software didn’t get confused. Though this was frustrating, the app was more than capable of meeting our needs to complete the project. The posters were then printed in A3 size and placed in relevant locations around campus for the duration of Digital Discovery Week (6th – 10th Nov, 2017). The posters also formed part of the “Making the invisible, visible” exhibition during the week. See the following blog post for a review of Digital Discovery Week. A few comments from the “Making the invisible, visible” exhibition:   I didn’t know The Keep had all these pictures – I love all the architecture – Research Student   It’s really interesting to see how much the Library has changed – Library staff What next? This was one of our first forays into using augmented reality, which we hope to build on now that we have some working examples and experience of using this technology. From field-trips, guided tours, treasure hunts, poster-presentations to enabling students as creators and more. We believe that the potential is there to use it to enhance teaching and learning in almost any discipline. If you’re interested in exploring potential uses of augmented reality in your own teaching, then please do get in touch with your school learning technologist for advice or contact tel@sussex.ac.uk

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How To Create Awesome Slideshow Presentations In iMovie

How To Create Awesome Slideshow Presentations In iMovie | Digital History | Scoop.it
Want to produce slideshows that go beyond simple cross dissolves and single track background music? Apple's iMovie for Mac OS X can help you create a professional looking slideshow presentations with few prior skills. We have covered several online solutions and mobile applications for creating slideshows, and you can also create slideshows in iPhoto or Aperture. But as today's article shows,…

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Using Video in the Classroom

Using Video in the Classroom | Digital History | Scoop.it
Christopher Graham, teacher and teacher trainer, looks at the benefits of using video in the classroom. Chris will be hosting a webinar entitled ‘It’s not just for comprehension! Using video in the classroom‘ on 22nd October.

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Kristyn Curran's curator insight, January 30, 2014 10:56 AM

Interesting article/video.  Makes you think how far we have come!

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Exploring Ancient History With Video Games by Paul Darvasi

Exploring Ancient History With Video Games by Paul Darvasi | Digital History | Scoop.it
By Paul Darvasi

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Randy Utz's curator insight, May 3, 7:54 PM
Video games instead of homework. It sounds like a student's fantasy. Luckily, for the student, video games can be utilized to allow students to interact with history in a way that is wholly unique to the medium. In a video game they get to make decisions in real time that effects the outcome of history and could potentially change the way the real world events play out. In this article the author shows how, when combined with primary source documents, video games can provide an immersive exercise in historical thought and analysis. 
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YouTube adds automatic slow motion tool to its video editing suite

YouTube adds automatic slow motion tool to its video editing suite | Digital History | Scoop.it
You no longer need to sink thousands of dollars into a high-speed camera — or even learn your way around an editing suite — to make a slow motion video. YouTube has added an automated editing...

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Slow motion implemented in youtube's tool suite!
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Vimeo Video School publishes 17 Final Cut Pro X tutorials

Vimeo Video School publishes 17 Final Cut Pro X tutorials | Digital History | Scoop.it
Vimeo Video School publishes 17 Final Cut Pro X tutorials

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Pretty good tutorial to get you started with some final cut basics
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The Amazing Ways Honeywell Is Using Virtual And Augmented Reality To Transfer Skills To Millennials

The Amazing Ways Honeywell Is Using Virtual And Augmented Reality To Transfer Skills To Millennials | Digital History | Scoop.it
Industrial giant Honeywell uses the latest in Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) to better transform skills from retiring baby boomers to millennials. This not only makes training more effective but also helps to engage a generation that has grown up with video games and social media.

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David W. Deeds's curator insight, March 18, 2:17 AM

This is geeky-cool stuff. 

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#Bose is developing augmented reality glasses with a focus on sound -@verge #investorseurope #technology

#Bose is developing augmented reality glasses with a focus on sound -@verge #investorseurope #technology | Digital History | Scoop.it
Bose is building augmented reality glasses with a focus on sound, based on its new Bose AR platform.

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Enos Senior's curator insight, March 10, 2:09 PM

"The company envisions having a Bose AR device reenact historical events or speeches from landmarks and statues as you visit them, or get audio directions to your gate when your GPS detects that you’ve arrived at the airport."

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A Collection of Some of The Best Word Cloud Tools for Teachers curated by Educators' technology

A Collection of Some of The Best Word Cloud Tools for Teachers curated by Educators' technology | Digital History | Scoop.it
Free resource of educational web tools, 21st century skills, tips and tutorials on how teachers and students integrate technology into education

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Pixlr- A Great Google Drive Tool for Editing Pictures

Pixlr- A Great Google Drive Tool for Editing Pictures | Digital History | Scoop.it

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New app connects Berkeley students with tumultuous history of Telegraph Avenue

New app connects Berkeley students with tumultuous history of Telegraph Avenue | Digital History | Scoop.it
App collects 11 oral histories of the iconic avenue

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How gamification can boost student success

How gamification can boost student success | Digital History | Scoop.it
Making education more like playing a game could dramatically improve learning.

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Julia Smith's curator insight, April 5, 9:24 PM
Human understanding is shaped by the technology that surrounds us. In light of this, and the fact that more people are gaining access to the internet every day, I think it's important to incorporate new technologies into our educational system. If students learn better with game achievements incorporated into classroom activities, then so much the better.
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Creating Sustainable Education by Developing Games

Creating Sustainable Education by Developing Games | Digital History | Scoop.it
Sustainable models are needed to reinvent the educational pipeline. Pong, released in 1972, launched the video game industry. Oregon Trail, released in 1971, proves learning game sustainability. This case study focuses on a unique learning game development approach and sustainable educational experience. The Live Lab and Texas A&M University are at the forefront of having students design, develop and use learning games. This self-sustaining model, provides future funding for educational games, student financial benefits, and innovates educational experiences. ARTé: Mecenas, an Art History game, and Variant, a Calculus game, are nationally available games that will serve as examples.

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Scientists immortalizing African heritage in virtual reality

Scientists immortalizing African heritage in virtual reality | Digital History | Scoop.it
Story highlights The project aims to preserve heritage sites for future generations Using high-tech lasers and drones the team record sites (CNN)The archaeological wonders of the world offer a rich window into the past. But many are crumbling, weed-laden and victim to vandalism and conflict. UNESCO World Heritage Sites, such as those in Libya and Mali, have been caught in the crossfire of regional disputes. Concerned with the decay of African heritage sites, The Zamani Project, based at the University of Cape Town, South Africa, is seeking to immortalize historic spots in three-dimensional, virtual reality-ready models. Professor Heinz Ruther steers the project. He ventures up and down the continent -- visiting Ghana, Tanzania, Mali, Ethiopia, Kenya and elsewhere -- recording in remarkable detail the structure and condition of tombs, churches and other buildings. "I've seen how sites are deteriorating visibly," Ruther told CNN. The project's aim is to build a database of complex, lifelike 3-D models. Presently, they've mapped around 60 sites including Lalibela in Ethiopia, Timbuktu in Mali and Kilwa in Tanzania. Digital landscapes The Zamani Project team in Meroë, Sudan The project's been running for 10 years and the team have digitally archived locations in all corners of the continent. Its mission is a worthy one: to preserve sites for future generations. Each site can take the team months to document. They travel to unsafe, hostile regions with high-tech laser scanners and drones. "(People) are suspicious as they think it is for military use," Ruther says. To record the archaeological structures, they position the scanner at various angles around the building, sending a laser which records around 10,000 points per second. "We use GPS measurements and try to cover every single aspect of the sites, that is every single corner. We go to areas which are not very attractive -- we cover everything," Ruther explains. Back at the university they collate all the spatial data to create the finished product, which can be experienced in virtual reality. "If you put Oculus glasses on you can walk through the sites we generate," Ruther says. He claims The Zamani Project is the only African-based organization 3-D mapping cultural heritage sites. 3-D preservation of history The reconstruction of Triumphal Arch at Palmyra in London. World heritage sites have not only been mapped in 3-D, but also built using 3-D printers. Palmyra's Triumphal Arch, which was destroyed by ISIS in Syria to global condemnation, was reconstructed using 3-D printing technology based on images previously captured of the structure. The project was undertaken by Oxford's Institute of Digital Archaeology, created to express solidarity with Syrians and the effort to preserve archaeological sites under threat. The future of the past There is a perennial threat to heritage sites from human activity and nature. "A slow deterioration (can happen) as vegetation grows over the side (of buildings). People also use the stones of the buildings to build their houses. It's a wide range of things, including terrorism," Ruther tells CNN. As of 2017, Africa has 138 UNESCO World Heritage Sites -- a small number given the amount of important historical and cultural landmarks on the continent. While efforts increase to bring recognition to African heritage, safeguarding this past could depend on high-tech methods used by Ruther and his team.

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Julia Smith's curator insight, May 5, 6:29 PM
In countries or cities where there are no funds to preserve historical architecture, it seems that implementing virtual reality may be a cheaper, more practical option to 'keep' a site intact. Hopefully such efforts will also generate public awareness of the sites and their need to be preserved for future audiences.
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Teacher Colleges Seek to Shift to Digital Age - Education Week News

Teacher Colleges Seek to Shift to Digital Age - Education Week News | Digital History | Scoop.it
Teacher Colleges Seek to Shift to Digital Age Education Week News Clemson University's Danielle Herro talks with students about their preconceptions of video games during the first day of the Foundations of Digital Media and Learning class, held in...

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Seeing both teachers and students use technology in classroom is a learning experience for multiple generations
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Kristyn Curran's curator insight, January 30, 2014 10:49 AM

Awesome article about how colleges are changing their teacher education programs to prepare future teachers for the technology demands of their students!  Awesome!

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John Hughes talks about using video in the classroom

Listen to John Hughes, co-author of Life, talking about using video in the ELT classroom.

Via Kristyn Curran
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Inspiration and engagement is a good way of getting students interested into the lessons being taught 
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Kristyn Curran's curator insight, January 30, 2014 10:58 AM

Students connect to videos!  Interesting point of view from John Hughes!

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Two Must Have Resources for History Teachers via Educators' technology

Two Must Have Resources for History Teachers via Educators' technology | Digital History | Scoop.it
Free resource of educational web tools, 21st century skills, tips and tutorials on how teachers and students integrate technology into education

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Bring 3D objects into Motion and Final Cut Pro X with mObject from MotionVFX - fcp.co

Bring 3D objects into Motion and Final Cut Pro X with mObject from MotionVFX - fcp.co | Digital History | Scoop.it
We have been teased with test renders and snippets of news about this plugin for a few weeks. It's been well worth the wait as mObject brings amazing 3d textured objects and text into Motion and then into Final Cut Pro X.

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Final Cut Pro X 10.3 is Here! It's FREE Upgrade and It’s Packed with New Features, Workflow Improvements and Editing Enhancements

Final Cut Pro X 10.3 is Here! It's FREE Upgrade and It’s Packed with New Features, Workflow Improvements and Editing Enhancements | Digital History | Scoop.it
Finally! Final Cut Pro X (also known as FCPX) has been upgraded! And what an upgrade it is! The user interface has been completely redesigned (tho most things are still in the same place thankfully). They’ve ‘flattened’ the UI and made many many streamlined improvements. So ... http://blog.planet5d.com/2016/10/final-cut-pro-x-10-3-is-here-its-free-upgrade-and-its-packed-with-new-features-workflow-improvements-and-editing-enhancements/
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Google Maps will now power location-aware augmented reality games

Google Maps will now power location-aware augmented reality games | Digital History | Scoop.it
GTA VI, anyone? Google has opened up its Maps API to let developers use real-world maps in their gaming universe | By Ishveena Singh

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David W. Deeds's curator insight, March 24, 2:51 AM

Geeky-coolest thing I've seen...in a week. ;)