digital divide information
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digital divide information
the difference between groups in the use of technology , digital literacy, technology literacy, information literacy, information gathering
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Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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Resources for Teaching in These Times - teaching about BIAS and Racism via NCTE

Resources for Teaching in These Times - teaching about BIAS and Racism via NCTE | digital divide information | Scoop.it
NCTE’

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Education 2.0 & 3.0
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How do you talk to kids about racism?

How do you talk to kids about racism? | digital divide information | Scoop.it
By four years, children have already begun to internalise bias and stereotypes. Yet research shows teachers and parents are often uncomfortable or unsure about talking to children about cultural difference.

Via Peter Mellow, Dean J. Fusto, Yashy Tohsaku
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, November 22, 2016 4:59 PM
I did not teach about racism in a direct way. I used projects that explored racism and how we strive to overcome various -isms. For example, I had students select a person they considered a hero to their community. Quite often, this led to students choosing Martin Luther King, Nelson Mandela, Rosa Parks, Jackie Robinson, Willie O'Ree (he broke the colour barrier in hockey), etc. It was terrific to see how students discovered what the sacrifices made to live in an inclusive world.
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The most racist places in America, according to Google

The most racist places in America, according to Google | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Private searches make it easy to express taboo thoughts
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The Idea of Race

You may know exactly what race you are, but how would you prove it if somebody disagreed with you? Jenée Desmond Harris explains. And for more on how race is a social construct:
http://www.vox.com/2014/10/10/6943461...

 

Tags: culture, race.


Via Seth Dixon
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Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, June 27, 2015 9:10 AM

Thomas Masaryk, político y humanista checo, llegó a Estados Unidos y se encontró con el cuestionario que preguntaba entre otras cosas a qué raza pertenecía el inmigrante. Tras pensarlo un rato, escribió: La Humana.

Denise Patrylo-Murray's curator insight, July 8, 2015 9:23 PM

I am always trying to explain to my students that race is a social construct-hopefully this video will help them to understand this concept.

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The long and ugly tradition of treating Africa as a dirty, diseased place

The long and ugly tradition of treating Africa as a dirty, diseased place | digital divide information | Scoop.it
   How alarmist, racist coverage of Ebola makes things worse. A dressing down of the latest #NewsweekFail.

Via Seth Dixon
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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 9, 2015 2:21 PM

Before I even read the article, my first thought went to the Linneaus classification.  That really damaged history with this one chart.  I think people still think of Africans and blacks(very dark blacks) as dirty or unintelligent.  Which is horrible and couldn't be further from the truth.  Misinforming the public is criminal.  News media and social media need to be careful and educate properly.  I've been asked from a customs offical, "Have you been to Africa in the past 6 months?"  Which is a very blanket question because Africa is a continent.  There were areas that were not hit with Ebola.  

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 27, 2015 4:37 PM

Those who deny the continued influence of racism in our society are blinding themselves to the truth. Contemporary influences of the racism that plagued the preceding centuries are still found in most major media depictions of Africa. The Ebola epidemic has served to highlight the bigotry that plagues Western media, as the assumption that all of Africa is diseased and dirty is continuously perpetuated (when, in reality, Ebola only affected a very small part of the continent). Africa is presented as "other," a backwards continent that is in desperate need of Western help and guidance- in what was is that different from the European colonizers who also viewed their actions as benevolent attempts to "civilize" the uncivilized? That mindset has not left Western circles, and yet we continue to pat ourselves on the back and congratulate ourselves for suddenly being so tolerant. The insensitivity of Western audiences to the concerns of black individuals both at home and in Africa related to the prevalence of racism highlights how determined mainstream media is to deny the existence of a problem. Until we recognize the Eurocentrism that continues to plague our media and make the necessary moves to correct the practice, harmful depictions of Africa will continue to loom large in Western media and in the opinions of many Europeans and Americans alike.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 30, 2015 7:12 AM

Africa has long been treated by the western media as a dark , brutish, uncivilized place. Africa is a place were people starve and murder each other in large numbers. There is so much more to Africa than the picture I just described. The problem is, many people just do not accept the existence of a culturally complex Africa. That narrative would destroy the traditional  darker narrative of the past 500 years. A narrative grounded in the beliefs that blacks are inherently inferior beings. During the Ebola crises, the calls to cut off travel to Africa were quick and demanding. Had the crises been in England, would those same calls have been so loud? I think we all can guess the answer  to that question. Much progress has been made, but we still need to change our cultural depiction of Africa.

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“The Monuments Must Go”: An Open Letter From the Great-Great-Grandsons of Stonewall Jackson

“The Monuments Must Go”: An Open Letter From the Great-Great-Grandsons of Stonewall Jackson | digital divide information | Scoop.it

"Dear Richmond Mayor Levar Stoney and members of the Monument Avenue Commission,

 

We are native Richmonders and also the great-great-grandsons of Stonewall Jackson. As two of the closest living relatives to Stonewall, we are writing today to ask for the removal of his statue, as well as the removal of all Confederate statues from Monument Avenue. They are overt symbols of racism and white supremacy, and the time is long overdue for them to depart from public display. Overnight, Baltimore has seen fit to take this action. Richmond should, too.

 

“We are ashamed to benefit from white supremacy while our black family and friends suffer. We are ashamed of the monument.”


Via ThePlanetaryArchives/San Francisco CA
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ThePlanetaryArchives/San Francisco CA's curator insight, August 17, 9:51 AM

"The South" lost the battles, but White Supremacy won the Civil War.....

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Why America Needs a Slavery Museum

"The Whitney Plantation near Wallace, Louisiana, is the first and only U.S. museum and memorial to slavery. While other museums may include slavery in their exhibits, the Whitney Plantation is the first of its kind to focus primarily on the institution. John Cummings, a 78-year-old white southerner, has spent 16 years and more than $8 million of his own fortune to build the project, which opened in December of last year.

Cummings, a successful trial attorney, developed the museum with the help of his full-time director of research, Ibrahima Seck. The duo hope to educate people on the realities of slavery in its time and its impact in the United States today. 'The history of this country is rooted in slavery,' says Seck. 'If you don’t understand the source of the problem, how can you solve it?'"

 

Tags: race, conflict, racism, historical, the South, landscape.


Via Seth Dixon
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's insight:

Additionally, here is a list of 13 honest books about slavery that young people should actually read.  

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Jukka Melaranta's curator insight, March 3, 2016 10:25 AM

Additionally, here is a list of 13 honest books about slavery that young people should actually read.  

Christian Allié's curator insight, March 5, 2016 3:10 AM

Additionally, here is a list of 13 honest books about slavery that young people should actually read.  

Aris Pastidis's curator insight, March 11, 2016 1:24 AM

Additionally, here is a list of 13 honest books about slavery that young people should actually read.  

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History of Lynchings in the South Documents Nearly 4,000 Names

History of Lynchings in the South Documents Nearly 4,000 Names | digital divide information | Scoop.it
After compiling an inventory of 3,959 lynching victims in 12 Southern states from 1877 to 1950, the Equal Justice Initiative wants to erect markers and memorials on certain sites.

 

Tags: race, conflict, racism, historical, the South, landscape.


Via Seth Dixon
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Ethnic/Population Density Map

Ethnic/Population Density Map | digital divide information | Scoop.it

"Drawing on data from the 2010 U.S. Census, the map shows one dot per person, color-coded by race. That's 308,745,538 dots in all."


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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 2014 11:52 AM

This describes challenges to human migration because it shows certain areas that people have moved to opposed to areas that have less population because of climate, area, etc...

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 2014 7:27 PM

This article shows the ethnic distribution across the US.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, September 25, 2014 12:30 PM

The Wired article's claim that this map depicts racial segregation instead of ethnic diversity can be seen in the patterns found in most of the major cities. While cities like Los Angeles and Las Vegas have many mixed areas containing different colored dots, other cities like Dallas and Atlanta show very clear cut lines between the ethnic makeup of areas. When zoomed out, the map certainly looks segregated with areas clearly marked blue, green, or yellow.