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the difference between groups in the use of technology , digital literacy, technology literacy, information literacy, information gathering
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Thanksgiving Resources

Thanksgiving Resources | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.

Via Seth Dixon
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's insight:
Regional divide in selection of meals for Thanksgiving?
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 21, 2016 8:11 AM

Looking for some Thanksgiving resources?  Here you go. 

 

Tags: Thanksgiving, food, seasonal.

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26 Things You Might Not Know Were Named After Places

26 Things You Might Not Know Were Named After Places | digital divide information | Scoop.it
From cheddar cheese to the tuxedo.

Via Seth Dixon
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Emma Boyle's curator insight, March 2, 2016 12:31 PM

Many ordinary objects are named for places where they were discovered, invented, or widely used. If you smell a dab of cologne on the man eating a Danish in the bungalow, the way you speak about that incident has a linguistic debt to a town in Germany, and the countries of Denmark and Bangladesh.  Many foods (especially wine and cheese) are named after places and 26 are highlighted in this article and here is a (semi-) exhaustive list of words derived from toponyms. 

 

Tags: food, language, toponyms.

MSTA's curator insight, March 3, 2016 3:35 PM

Many ordinary objects are named for places where they were discovered, invented, or widely used. If you smell a dab of cologne on the man eating a Danish in the bungalow, the way you speak about that incident has a linguistic debt to a town in Germany, and the countries of Denmark and Bangladesh.  Many foods (especially wine and cheese) are named after places and 26 are highlighted in this article and here is a (semi-) exhaustive list of words derived from toponyms. 

 

Tags: food, language, toponyms.

Jodi Esaili's curator insight, March 4, 2016 3:34 PM

Many ordinary objects are named for places where they were discovered, invented, or widely used. If you smell a dab of cologne on the man eating a Danish in the bungalow, the way you speak about that incident has a linguistic debt to a town in Germany, and the countries of Denmark and Bangladesh.  Many foods (especially wine and cheese) are named after places and 26 are highlighted in this article and here is a (semi-) exhaustive list of words derived from toponyms. 

 

Tags: food, language, toponyms.

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Product of Mexico: Hardship on Mexico's farms, a bounty for U.S. tables

Product of Mexico: Hardship on Mexico's farms, a bounty for U.S. tables | digital divide information | Scoop.it

"Farm exports to the U.S. from Mexico have tripled to $7.6 billion in the last decade, enriching agribusinesses, distributors and retailers.
American consumers get all the salsa, squash and melons they can eat at affordable prices. And top U.S. brands — Wal-Mart, Whole Foods, Subway and Safeway, among many others — profit from produce they have come to depend on.These corporations say their Mexican suppliers have committed to decent treatment and living conditions for workers.  But a Los Angeles Times investigation found that for thousands of farm laborers south of the border, the export boom is a story of exploitation and extreme hardship."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 18, 2015 4:31 PM

This is a hard read, but it is important to understand that there is a dark underbelly to many of the economic systems that are reshaping the world today.  Sometimes we ask all the wrong questions, like "why is organic, local, or fair trade food so expensive?"  We should really be asking why the other options are so cheap. 


This, unfortunately is part of the answer.  This is a 4-part series (I-camps, II-labor, III-Company Stores, IV-Child Labor) from the LA Times that has excellent pictures, videos, and interviews highlighting the working conditions of farm workers in Mexico.  For an audio version, here is an NPR podcast interviewing Richard Marosi, the investigator behind the story.    


Tagsfoodeconomic, laborglobalizationfood production, agribusiness, agriculture, unit 5 agriculture, indigenous.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:24 PM

This is a hard read, but it is important to understand that there is a dark underbelly to many of the economic systems that are reshaping the world today.  Sometimes we ask all the wrong questions, like "why is organic, local, or fair trade food so expensive?"  We should really be asking why the other options are so cheap. 

 

This, unfortunately is part of the answer.  This is a 4-part series (I-camps, II-labor, III-Company Stores, IV-Child Labor) from the LA Times that has excellent pictures, videos, and interviews highlighting the working conditions of farm workers in Mexico.  For an audio version, here is an NPR podcast interviewing Richard Marosi, the investigator behind the story.    

 

Tagsfoodeconomic, laborglobalization, food production, agribusiness, agriculture, unit 5 agriculture, indigenous.

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Take A Mouth-Watering Tour Of School Lunches From Around The World

Take A Mouth-Watering Tour Of School Lunches From Around The World | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Eating at the school cafeteria could've been amazing if you grew up almost anywhere but the U.S.

 

Tags: agriculture, food distribution. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Emily Bian's curator insight, March 25, 2015 5:53 PM

This is a really cool article! I always enjoy looking at food from around the world, so I automatically scooped this when I saw it. This is a article with a slideshow of school lunches around the world. At the very end of the photo slide, there is a photo of an American school lunch which is pretty embarrassing compared to Brazil and Finland. This photo series was taken by SweetGreens, and the school lunches were put together to represent an average school lunch, not necessarily what they have every day. 

They talk about how each country eats what is grown around them, while US is processed food like chicken nuggets and chocolate chip cookie.

I really want to move to Brazil and eat their school lunch, haha! It looks so good. For dessert in Finland, they have a berry crepe on their plate! That's awesome! If you have some free time, then be sure to check this out! 

5) Interdependence among regions of food production and consumption

Raychel Johnson's curator insight, May 25, 2015 6:46 PM

Summary: This article showed a series of pictures, which showed traditional school lunches of different countries. Greece's lunch included a Mediterranean diet, while Brazil's had rice and beans with greens, and the United States had its classic chicken nuggets, chocolate chip cookie, and mashed potatoes. The goal of this article was definitely to show what foods were incorporated into different cultures and climates.

 

Insight: Food is one example of a cultural trait, and quite a prominent one. Tradition may prohibit or encourage eating a certain kind of food, while long term climate also makes a large difference on the crops traditional grown in a country. 

Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, February 10, 2016 9:16 AM

This is an excellent way to compare the impact that agriculture and culture in general have on our schools! 

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McDonald's International

McDonald's International | digital divide information | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 17, 2014 10:45 PM

We talk about McDonalds as a way of Americanizing the rest of the world. These foods show that it may still be the case but local culture is still infused and desired where McDonalds expands to.

Payton Sidney Dinwiddie 's curator insight, January 21, 2015 9:40 PM

This shows that mmcdonals is a global industy . there are many mcdonalds everywhere they put a spin oncertain diishes to match their heritage like in japan instead of hamburger meat like we americans use the use crabs.It just really shows how far mcdonalds was changed from just starting in america to being featured all over the globe

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 22, 2015 7:06 PM

I've lived and traveled to a few places especially Asia.  I've had the Ramen at McD's in Hawaii along with the Portugeuse sausage that comes with the big breakfast.  I've also experienced Japanese McD's.  It was nice to be able to find some of the regular food like a burger and fry at any McD's in the world, but I never ordered anything else. 

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All the Countries That Contribute to a Single Jar of Nutella

All the Countries That Contribute to a Single Jar of Nutella | digital divide information | Scoop.it
Turkish hazelnuts, Malaysian palm oil, Nigerian cocoa, Brazilian sugar, French vanilla...

 

Some 250,000 tons of Nutella are now sold across 75 countries around the world every year, according to the OECD. Nutella is a perfect example of what globalization has meant for popular foodstuffs: Not only is it sold everywhere, but its ingredients are sourced from all over the place too.


Via Seth Dixon, Amanda Morgan
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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, January 28, 2014 1:26 PM

Some things that we take for granted are and come from all over the world. As you said in last class just because something says that it is not made in China doesnt mean that their arent any resources that the company used to creat the item that didn't come from China or any other power house place. In this case the Palm Oil comesd from Malaysia, Hazelnut comes from Turkey, Cocoa from Nigeria, Vainilla from Brazil and, Vainilla and Sugar from France.

Mrs Parkinson's curator insight, February 12, 2014 3:48 PM

GCSE Globalisation info - great case study

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 10:55 AM

I was surprised to see how many countries contribute to s single jar of nutella. I have always assumed it came straight from Italy just because it is an Italian commodity. It is a positive thing to see because you look at the commerce and trade that is generated throughout the world through this one brand alone

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Families Around The World Show What They Eat In a Week…

Families Around The World Show What They Eat In a Week… | digital divide information | Scoop.it

Families around the world share what they eat!

 


Via Pippa Davies @PippaDavies , Suvi Salo
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Pippa Davies @PippaDavies 's curator insight, January 31, 2014 10:16 AM

Use this article with images to have a discussion with your students around diet, health and consumption.  It will really get your students thinking!

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From Farm to Fork: Our Toxic Food System - infographic

From Farm to Fork: Our Toxic Food System - infographic | digital divide information | Scoop.it

Food is the fuel we use to get our bodies into motion. 

However, with the way our current food system works, processed foods such as chips, soda, french fries, hamburgers and candy are making up a significant portion of our daily food intake. They’re readily available at every food store, and an ice cold Coca-Cola is very difficult to pass up in favor of sparkling water. The problem, though, is that it’s not even about choosing healthy options. Today, 80% of food in the U.S. is supplied by massive factory farms associated with a myriad of environmental and health risks.

 

Do you know where your food comes from? Or what’s in it? How is a hotdog made? Today’s conventional food system depends heavily on the use of toxic chemicals and synthetic inputs that pose threats to our health — especially children’s.


Via Lauren Moss, FarmRoof®
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FarmRoof®'s curator insight, June 28, 2013 2:51 PM

What a great infographic!

sTreet's comment, July 5, 2013 4:03 AM
fantastic
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Cotton Candy Grapes?!?

Cotton Candy Grapes?!? | digital divide information | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 20, 2016 3:03 PM

After years of seeing fruit-flavored candy, we are now seeing candy-flavored fruit. The company Grapery is very careful to highlight that these patented fruit varieties are not GMOs, but the cotton candy flavored grapes are cross pollinated by hand (by fruit geneticists). You can watch this 4 minute CBS video about the agricultural production and marketing of this new product. Yes, I've experimented with these at a friend's house, and they really do taste like cotton candy (and no, I'm not planning on purchasing any).     

 

Questions to Ponder: Does this make you leery about eating this or totally excited to try it? How come?  Why is the company so adamant to state that these grapes are non-GMO? According to the video, what are the primary concerns of most grape producers and how does that contrast with this company?  

  

Tagsfood, food production, agribusiness, agriculture, GMOstechnology.

Shir Turgeman's curator insight, April 11, 2017 9:24 AM
טעמו של סוג ענבים זה הוא בדיוק כמו של "שיערות סבתא" שהיינו אוכלים בתור ילדים. בנוסף, בשונה מ"שיערות סבתא", ענבים אלו אינם דביקים ואינם מלאים בתוספי סוכר אבל הם הרבה יותר מתוקים בטעמם מענבים רגילים ומכילים יותר מיץ. על ענבים אלו מדברים בכל העולם- מעיתונים וכתבי עט ועד חדשות בפריים טיים. אנשים לא מאמינים עד כמה זה קרוב בטעם לממתק (שיערות סבתא) המוכר, עד אשר הם טועמים את זה.