Digital Collaboration and the 21st C.
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Transmedia Journalism in 499 Words

Transmedia Journalism in 499 Words | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it

Kevin Moloney: "Transmedia journalism is designing a project to unfold across multiple media in an expansive rather than repetitive way" ...


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Digital Collaboration and the 21st C.
Examines the connectivity possible for global knowledge participative creation and sharing.
Curated by Susan Myburgh
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The State Of IoT Intelligence - a report full of data on this new technology trend

The State Of IoT Intelligence - a report full of data on this new technology trend | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
  • Sales, Marketing and Operations are most active early adopters of IoT today.
  • Early adopters most often initiate pilots to drive revenue and gain operational efficiencies faster than anticipated.
  • 32% of enterprises are investing in IoT, and 48% are planning to in 2019.
  • IoT early adopters lead their industries in advanced and predictive analytics adoption.

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Farid Mheir's curator insight, November 27, 2018 6:48 PM

WHY IT MATTERS: IOT is a key technology trend but as this survey shows its penetration remains small - and thus the future looks good.

Riddhima Building's comment, December 26, 2018 11:06 AM
#RevolutionOfPreEngineeredBuildingshttps://bit.ly/2V9l3lo
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Hi-Tech Sustainability : The science and technology of eco-fashion

Hi-Tech Sustainability : The science and technology of eco-fashion | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it

The science and technology of eco-fashion: How tech is addressing the problems it helped create.


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Naveen Dhollon's comment, December 19, 2018 2:30 PM
https://pmscarerelocation.blogspot.com/2018/12/self-moving-vs-moving-packers-and.html
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KINGHOPE TH-102 fiber coaxial fever tube tube amplifier lossless Bluetooth HIFI amplifier machine home https://www.newbecca.com/product/category/50018918
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Health Checkup Roadmap

Health Checkup Roadmap | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Wondering what you should be wondering about in terms of your health? We'll guide you through what to ask your doctor and what you need to know, when.

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reviewspark's curator insight, October 5, 2018 4:43 PM
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Oxford Internet Institute announces 2018 winners of OII Awards — Oxford Internet Institute

Oxford Internet Institute announces 2018 winners of OII Awards — Oxford Internet Institute | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
The Oxford Internet Institute (OII) has announced the winners of the 2018 OII Awards, given to recognise extraordinary contributions towards the development, use or study of the Internet for the public good. This year’s winners represent some of the most influential figures in the shaping of today’s Internet and online environment, hailing from the fields of information and communication technology, academia, law, and international development. ‘I am so delighted that the OII is recognising the outstanding achievements of these four incredible women,’ says Professor Phil Howard, Director of the OII. ‘The study and use of the Internet for public good is core to our OII mission, and these winners are remarkable in their efforts to support justice, inclusion and equality in so many aspects of technology use’. 2018 Lifetime Achievement Award Winners Two winners will be presented with a Lifetime Achievement Award, recognising their outstanding vision, determination and hard work that have led to significant contributions to the understanding and use of the Internet over the years. Professor Judy Wajcman is a founding contributor to the field of the social study of science and technology and has carried out extensive research on the impact of digital technologies over the last decade. Her books, such as The Social Shaping of Technology, Feminism Confronts Technology, and Managing Like a Man, are regarded as classics in the field. She is a Fellow of the British Academy, has been President of the Society for Social Studies of Science, is a recipient of the William F. Ogburn Career Achievement Award from the American Sociological Association, and was awarded an honorary doctorate from the University of Geneva. Professor Wajcman is currently the Anthony Giddens Professor of Sociology at the London School of Economics. Karen Banks is a networking pioneer in the use of information and communication technologies for social change. She is a founding member of the Association for Progressive Communications’s (APC) Women’s Rights Programme, an international non-profit organisation that wants everyone to have access to a free and open internet. She has served on the UN Working Group for Internet Governance, was a founding trustee at Privacy International, was the winner of the inaugural Anita Borg Social Impact Award, and is a member of the Internet Hall of Fame. She currently serves as a director at GreenNet, a non-profit Internet service provider. 2018 Internet and Society Award Winners Two winners will be presented with the Internet and Society Award, which is given to outstanding individuals or organisations in recognition of their work in the development of the Internet for the public good through particular initiatives. Anasuya Sengupta is the Co-Founder and Co-Director of Whose Knowledge?, a global multi-lingual campaign that aims to centre the knowledges and voices of marginalised communities (the majority of the world) in order to create an Internet for and from everyone. Initiatives have included the 2018 Decolonising the Internet conference, the #VisibleWikiWomen challenge to add more images of notable women to Wikipedia, and the communities-led Knowledge Sharing projects. Anasuya is the former Chief Grantmaking Officer at the Wikimedia Foundation, Regional Program Director for Asia and the Pacific Islands at the Global Fund for Women, and a 2017 Shuttleworth Fellow. Nani Jansen Reventlow is the founding Director of the Digital Freedom Fund, which supports the advancement of digital rights in Europe through strategic litigation. She is a recognised international lawyer responsible for many ground-breaking freedom of expression cases around the world, such as the first freedom of expression judgement from the African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights. Nani is an Affiliate at the Berkman Klein Center, an advisor to Harvard’s Cyberlaw Clinic, and a lecturer at Columbia Law School. The 2018 OII Awards will take place on Friday 16 November 2018, beginning with a Lifetime Achievement lecture by Professor Judy Wajcman and drinks reception at the Bodleian Libraries. Book tickets now.
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CyberGuerrilla soApboX » Demand Digital Peace

CyberGuerrilla soApboX » Demand Digital Peace | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
We are Digital Citizens—members of a thriving online global society. We trust technology to help us do our jobs, create communities and connect us.As Digital Citizens, we also share the responsibil...
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Collections as data: Implications for enclosure | Padilla | College & Research Libraries News

Collections as data: Implications for enclosure...
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Non-Resident Fellowships - Digital Civil Society Lab

About the fellowship The digital age has expanded the potential for civil society participation and presented new challenges and threats.Our dependencies on digital software and infrastructure that are commercially built and government surveilled require new insights into how these digital systems...
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Participants Sought for Digital Programme Exploring Museum’s Unique Collections

Participants Sought for Digital Programme Exploring Museum’s Unique Collections | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Participants are being sought from across the Ards and North Down Borough Council area to take part in an exciting new digital programme exploring the unique Sir John Newell Jordan collection held at North Down Museum.
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How are museums reinventing themselves for the digital generation?

How are museums reinventing themselves for the digital generation? | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Museums might be a nod to the past, but they have to look to the future.
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Main Page | Controlled Digital Lending by Libraries

Main Page | Controlled Digital Lending by Libraries | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Controlled Digital Lending (CDL) is an emerging method that allows libraries to loan print books to digital patrons in a “lend like print” fashion. Through CDL, libraries use technical controls to ensure a consistent “owned-to-loaned” ratio, meaning the library circulates the exact number of copies of a specific title it owns, regardless of format, putting controls in place to prevent users from redistributing or copying the digitized version. When CDL is appropriately tailored to reflect print book market conditions and controls are properly implemented, CDL may be permissible under existing copyright law. CDL is not intended to act as a substitute for existing electronic licensing services offered by publishers. Indeed, one significant advantage of CDL is addressing the “Twentieth Century Problem” of older books still under copyright but unlikely ever to be offered digitally by commercial services. The resources on this site offer libraries an opportunity to: better understand the legal framework underpinning CDL, communicate their support for CDL, and build a community of expertise around the practice of CDL.
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Humans+AI working together brings benefits across 5 areas in a study of 1,500 Companies #AI #BigTrends @HBR

Humans+AI working together brings benefits across 5 areas in a study of 1,500 Companies #AI #BigTrends @HBR | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it

Companies benefit from optimizing collaboration between humans and artificial intelligence. Five principles can help them do so: Reimagine business processes; embrace experimentation/employee involvement; actively direct AI strategy; responsibly collect data; and redesign work to incorporate AI and cultivate related employee skills. A survey of 1,075 companies in 12 industries found that the more of these principles companies adopted, the better their AI initiatives performed in terms of speed, cost savings, revenues, or other operational measures.


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Farid Mheir's curator insight, September 3, 2018 8:34 PM

WHY IT MATTERS: use this diagram as a guide to determine where and how to combine humans with AI.

Vezta & Co.'s curator insight, September 4, 2018 12:40 PM

WHY IT MATTERS: use this diagram as a guide to determine where and how to combine humans with AI.

factonews.com's curator insight, September 4, 2018 4:12 PM
1800-608-2336 We are certified technical support team since 2007 (www.Factonews.com). and we support type like Email, Printer ,Antivirus,Yahoo mail, issues.our Tollfree number is 18006082336
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In what ways are Facebook Battling Cyber Crime?

In what ways are Facebook Battling Cyber Crime? | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
As part of Information Age's cybersecurity month, we examine the ways in which Facebook is battling cyber crime.

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From diet pills to Driverless Cars: why we need to debate the politics of Science and Technology

From diet pills to Driverless Cars: why we need to debate the politics of Science and Technology | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
It’s time to say goodbye to the Political Science blog at the Guardian – but we’re moving to a new home...

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14 Predictions for the future of Media

14 Predictions for the future of Media | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
The media landscape is almost shifting more quickly than consumers can keep up, but trends have emerged that will carry the media industry into the future. Business Insider co-founder and CEO Henry Blodget offers 14 key takeaways from industry pioneers.

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Google Says Don't Change URLs When Replacing Old Content With New Content

Google Says Don't Change URLs When Replacing Old Content With New Content | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it

So let's say you decided to update the content on a page on your web site, the content is super out dated and needs a major revamp. When you update the content, it doesn't mean you need to put that new content on a new URL, you can just update the content on the existing URL. In fact, Google recommends it.


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Martin (Marty) Smith's curator insight, December 19, 2018 12:32 PM

Adding content to older pages lives by Google's QDF (Quality Deserves Freshness) rule and reduces quantity in favor of quality. That last part, the reduction of quantity in favor of quality, seems to be motivating Google's latest algorithm changes (to the extent anyone can understand why Google does anything. 

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Over 95% of UK Still Carries Cash Showing Stalling of “Cashless Society”

Over 95% of UK Still Carries Cash Showing Stalling of “Cashless Society” | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Nearly the entire United Kingdom carries cash, indicating that its citizens may feel some needs unfulfilled by banking and payment apps.According to a report by the Post Office, the vast majority …...
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Sidewalk Toronto: The Poverty of Our Civic Institutions

Hello mothers and fathers of the City of Toronto — where are you?The brazen Google propaganda and public relations machine is picking up speed and your voices are more needed on this project than…...
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Sessions - Ideas Digital Forum 2018

Sessions - Ideas Digital Forum 2018 | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
A symposium exploring art now / art next in Oshawa.
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Scientists quantify the vast and valuable finds stored on museum shelves

Scientists quantify the vast and valuable finds stored on museum shelves | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Scientists team up to quantify the “dark data” in fossil collections.
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Interview with Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales - CILIP: the library and information association

Interview with Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales - CILIP: the library and information association | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales talks about the search for trusted information and the role of libraries and librarians in this changing world.
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Ten-Point Reflection on the European Commission’s proposal for a Regulation establishing the Creative Europe programme (2021-2027) | IETM

Ten-Point Reflection on the European Commission’s proposal for a Regulation establishing the Creative Europe programme (2021-2027) | IETM | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
The points are presented on behalf of the performing arts sector. Elaborated by IETM and co-signed by Circostrada, EDN, ETC and In-situ. “The successor programme may play a valuable role in responding to populism by reinforcing cultural diversity and increasing tolerance and mutual understanding. Therefore the programme will intensify the citizens' dimension of its activities.”[1] Creative Europe, the current EU programme for cultural and creative sectors, has proven its potential to build interpersonal bonds and emotional engagement beyond national frontiers. These are the strongest glue of the European project and the undeniable foundation for a shared European future. Artistic mobility and cooperation across borders are vital when it comes to nourishing mutual understanding, solidarity, and thinking beyond national paradigms. The need for international exchange is insufficiently addressed at Member State level, and some of the current political developments, both within the EU and beyond its borders, even hinder mobility and cross-border partnerships. Therefore, a European programme for culture is essential to continue to promote international cooperation and mobility of cultural operators and artworks. Furthermore, Creative Europe has played a crucial role in supporting the sector’s development by creating a pan-European forum for accumulating and exchanging knowledge on – inter alia – sustainable management models, seizing opportunities brought by digital technologies and engaging with audiences. On May 30, the European Commission released its proposal for a Regulation establishing the Creative Europe programme for 2021-2027. We welcome the newly designed stand-alone programme for cultural and creative sectors (CCS), meant to be reinforced with an increased budget of € 1,85 billion. We endorse the  Commission’s recognition of culture’s role in strengthening inclusive and cohesive communities, and the programme’s intention to support the initiatives that contribute to a socially more inclusive European society. The recent Commission’s report on the mid-term evaluation of the current programme stated that “Creative Europe will address in a balanced manner the two general objectives of the programme i.e. cultural diversity and competitiveness, taking account of the multifaceted dimension of the programme as well as its cultural, social and economic objectives.” The new proposal also claims to take into account the “dual nature of cultural and creative sectors”; their artistic merits as well as their economic utility. Yet the document’s spirit is by far more business and growth driven. It is more specific and lengthy when it comes to the sectors which are more likely to contribute to the economic growth and employment. At the same time, the programme’s societal and citizen-oriented priorities fade into the background. This is at odds with the current state of the EU, which is challenged by eurosceptic tendencies and social disintegration, creating the need for some intangible fuel to design inclusive and cross-border spaces for an equal dialogue among its citizens and multiple communities. Moreover, the proposal’s industry-driven focus does not match the discourse of the recently released ambitious New Agenda for Culture which puts forward the long-awaited recognition of the value of arts and culture for social cohesion, building a true community among Europeans based on shared values, feeling of togetherness, and active citizenship. Considering this imbalance, as well as reacting to the specific sectoral initiatives, we call for equal support to all cultural and artistic sectors, including those which need public support the most, due to the time- and human-intensive nature of their work, as we believe that this is the only fair and effective way of enhancing the diversity of cultural expressions in Europe. Furthermore, we draw the European institutions’ and Member States’ attention to the following points to be taken into account when designing a programme truly suited for the European cultural and creative sectors: 1. The true value of the arts The paper asserts that cultural and creative sectors “promote European excellence on the world stage, reinforcing the Union’s global positioning.” If the programme is to be comprehensive and embrace the arts, it must take into account that the biggest value of the arts is their potential to facilitate an equal dialogue and create human-based bridges among different realities, mentalities and identities, rather than promoting political concepts. 2. Sufficient resources The programme’s budget is denoted as “reinforced”, which logically stems from the proposed increase from € 1,6 billion to € 1,85 billion. However, given the intention to accommodate various new priorities and actions within the programme (such as sector-specific initiatives, a mobility fund, and new areas of interest of the cross-sectorial strand), and taking into account the multiple challenges the CCS’s are encountering, the programme must be strengthened with a much more significant amount. Moreover, the increase should primarily be used to top up the budgets of strands dealing with extreme low success rates. 3. Cultural diversity in a broader sense The programme’s focus on cultural diversity mostly pertains to the cross-border circulation of, notably, audio-visual works. We regret that it insufficiently endorses such vital elements of cultural diversity, as transnational interpersonal bonds, resulting in the circulation of live art works and professionals, an equal dialogue among diverse social, cultural and ethnic groups inhabiting European cities and settlements, as well as a “safe” space which can accommodate this diversity, immune to fear and intolerance. The arts and culture are powerful anchors for establishing and nourishing such a dialogue and such a space. 4. Mobility of art works The first priority of the Culture strand is “to strengthen the cross-border dimension and circulation of European cultural and creative operators and works.” The “cross-border circulation of works” is also mentioned as one of the expected generated Union added values. However, Annex I, which details the priorities further, only mentions “mobility of artists and cultural and creative operators” for the Culture strand. We strongly advocate complementing cross-border mobility of art professionals with special touring grants for mobility of art works within Europe and beyond, which would enable showing the results of cooperation projects in as many European countries as possible, as well as outside the EU. Circulation of art works contributes greatly to the sustainability and extension of art projects’ life-spans, and enhances the promotion of the European arts’ richness to the diverse and large audiences across the continent and beyond. 5. Challenges faced by artists The list of challenges faced by the CCSs identified by the Commission’s proposal does not sufficiently embody the precarious social and economic situation faced by artists all over Europe. One of the challenges faced by the arts which should be addressed is the market-based model of functioning, at the cost of time spent on research and audience engagement, and artists remuneration. 6. Freedom of artistic expression Free media environment is mentioned as one of the areas of the future programme’s support. No matter how pertinent it is for the current situation of journalism and media in Europe and beyond, it is striking that the programme destined to support cultural and creative sectors does not clearly focus on the freedom of artistic expression, which is being increasingly and considerably undermined in some parts of Europe. The programme fairly associates critical thinking with media literacy and high quality journalism; however, it is also essential to address the undeniable power of the arts to open minds and encourage critical reflection. 7. Diversity, inclusion, access and equality We welcome the programme’s ambition to promote gender equality, which is still a hill to climb in most of the EU Member States. Nevertheless, as our societies are going through rapid transformations, caused inter alia by migration, ageing of the population, and societal consequences of the financial crisis, the Europe of today and tomorrow needs to invest in building inclusive and diverse communities and fight all types of discrimination based on gender, ethnic and geographic origin, social background, physical ability, sexual orientation, etc. Therefore, the programme should embrace diversity, inclusion, access and equality as its guiding values and requirements for applying. 8. Synergies with other policies The programme states there are “strong links - notably in the fields of media pluralism, European identity, values and cultural heritage - between the Creative Europe programme and the Rights and Values programme.” It cannot be stressed enough that the arts have a great power to raise awareness of and to promote the rights and values the EU cherishes as its anchors. All the more so, the Commission’s mid-term evaluation report confirms that “recent developments show the importance of creativity and culture in sustaining healthy democracies, diversity and a shared sense of European identity.” As for the possible synergies between Creative Europe regional and rural policies, a great value is attributed to cultural heritage, tourism and creative industries. It is crucial to feature in the new programme that the arts play a tremendous role in revitalising rural areas and nurturing their self-identification. Besides, participative art practices equip underprivileged citizens and communities with innovative tools to address their challenges, reflect on their values and bring their aspirations to life. 9. Small organisations’ access The document acknowledges that the limited access of small organisations to Creative Europe 2014-2020 has been one of the pitfalls of the current programme’s design. Nevertheless, it is not entirely clear what the effective measures are, besides the cascading grants, to be applied to ensure a fairer scheme in which small organisations do not have to go through insurmountable competition with bigger players. Small-scale projects and small organisations are very often the ones most involved with the most urgent  social issues; they are also particularly flexible, agile and inclined to international mobility. Thus, they must be fairly included in the future scheme. A special strand based on lighter application conditions for small organisations and small-scale initiatives should be a solution. 10. Flexibility and expansion of the programme We appreciate the proposal to endow the future programme with “greater flexibility”, in order to adapt to “unforeseen circumstances or new technological and societal developments”. However, we stress that the programme’s priorities must be developed based on a strategic and long-term vision, which aims to ensure the sustainability of the projects supported. We agree that the appearance of a new topic in the programme may happen ad hoc in order to respond to the urgent phenomena in society. In this case, an expansion of the programme requires a more substantial budget, in order to avoid endangering the consistency of some initiatives developed in the framework of the pre-existing priorities and the continuity of a budget for such a long-term goal as, for instance, social integration. The EU funding programme for culture remains a vital added value supporting the sector’s development and sustainable cooperation, as a counterforce to a disintegrating Europe. Therefore, we call on the European Parliament and the Member States to endorse the Commission’s proposal for the stand-alone Creative Europe programme and to modify the proposal taking into account the points outlined above. Download in PDF [1] REPORT FROM THE COMMISSION TO THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND THE COUNCIL Mid-term evaluation of the Creative Europe programme (2014-2020)
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The Pivotal Role of Academic Librarians in Digital Learning by Melissa N. Mallon - Libraries Unlimited - ABC-CLIO

The Pivotal Role of Academic Librarians in Digital Learning by Melissa N. Mallon - Libraries Unlimited - ABC-CLIO | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
The current budget-constrained, rapidly evolving climate of higher education and academic libraries makes it a necessity for academic librarians and administrators to communicate the value of their library to the university. This book explains how to execute this critical task. Authored by a library director and director of library liason and instructional services who formerly served as a faculty member, a librarian, and a professional development instructor, The Pivotal Role of Academic Librarians in Digital Learning establishes the library's role in supporting student learning in an increasingly digital environment by exploring theoretical foundations and sharing concrete examples. The chapters focus on strategies and methods for demonstrating the academic library's value through strategic campus partnerships, creation of learning objects such as video tutorials, research instruction designed to facilitate student collaboration, and participation in assessment of learning on campus. All of the topics addressed within a broad range of subject matter fall within the scope of learning in the "digital age," with particular emphasis on utilizing online learning environments—including social media—to teach students critical thinking and research skills as well as to position the academic library as an integral part of the modern learning environment. This book is a must-read for academic librarians in instructional roles, teaching faculty, academic library administrators and managers who need to communicate the value of the library in relation to student learning, and academic administrators who are obligated to demonstrate the important role of libraries in academic excellence. Features Advocates and explains the instructional role of academic librarians—a role that is key and continuing to grow in importance Furnishes practical examples of digital products and proven processes to aid in student learning Provides concrete methodologies to use technology to increase the visibility and perceived value of academic libraries Illustrates the use of templates, lesson plans, and other tools that serve teaching librarians
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Clean up your online presence - Deseat.me

Clean up your online presence - Deseat.me | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it

Clean up your online presence

Instantly get a list of all your accounts, delete the ones you are not using.


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Nik Peachey's curator insight, October 2, 2018 12:41 PM

Great tool if you or your students want to make a new start and clear up your online footprint.

Suzana Biseul PRo's curator insight, October 3, 2018 6:56 PM
Indispensable!
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Artificial Intelligence is Critical for Social Media Listening

Artificial Intelligence is Critical for Social Media Listening | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
With the recently published The Forrester WaveTM: Social Listening Platforms, Q3 2018, Forrester offered their perspective into the marketplace. Our view of this market, and our experience with customers, differs from the Forrester perspective in fundamental ways.

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Deepak Pal's curator insight, September 4, 2018 8:30 AM

Artificial Intelligence is the need of modern businesses. #AI #Social 

Grengar Pitter's comment, September 7, 2018 4:01 PM
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What % of the Digital Tech Workforce is Female?

What % of the Digital Tech Workforce is Female? | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Women in tech, or the lack thereof, is a hot topic in the industry right now. It’s long been known that the tech industry is dominated by men, with a cohort of front-page-making idolised entrepreneurs that are almost exclusively male – think Jobs, Gates, Zuckerberg, Bezos, Page, Brin, Musk et al.

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