Digital Collaboration and the 21st C.
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Digital Collaboration and the 21st C.
Examines the connectivity possible for global knowledge participative creation and sharing.
Curated by Susan Myburgh
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A Million Minds: Building Unshakeable Foundations for Transformational Change

The world needs a new generation of bright-eyed, open hearted leaders with the confidence and skills to inspire change at speed and scale. Million Minds is a new platform being built by progressive educators and activists in businesses and community to find and share the best resources imaginable to help those future leaders grow.

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David Hain's curator insight, July 6, 2:57 AM

Nice article on a really exciting new initiative to build a coalition of transformational change agents!

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Digital literacy in libraries: joining the dots – Insights from Kate Lomax | Princh Team

Digital literacy in libraries: joining the dots – Insights from Kate Lomax | Princh Team | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
As digital technology becomes ubiquitous, digital literacy support needs to be equally ready and available - it can no longer sit alone and isolated in the event calendar. Read Kate Lomax's to learn why digital literacy is more important now than ever.
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The EU’s Controversial Digital Single Market Directive - Part II: Why the Proposed Mandatory Text- and Data-Mining Exception Is Too Restrictive

The EU’s Controversial Digital Single Market Directive - Part II: Why the Proposed Mandatory Text- and Data-Mining Exception Is Too Restrictive | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Forthcoming in the November 2018 issue of Communications of the ACM, a computing professionals journal, is a column entitled “Legally Speaking: The EU’s Controversial Digital Single Market Directive” by Professor Pamela Samuelson, Berkeley Law School.
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Advancing 21st Century Tech Policies

Advancing 21st Century Tech Policies | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Voices for Innovation (VFI) is a Microsoft supported community of technology professionals and everyday Americans who help advance technology, IT job growth, and businesses of all sizes.
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The EU's Global a Civic Tech Competition!

The EU's Global a Civic Tech Competition! | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
CivicTech4Democracy is the European Union’s global competition showcasing democratic innovation by Citizens for Citizens across the world. Every day, everywhere, citizens invent new ways of bringing democracy closer to the people.
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The digital transformation and the importance of humans

The digital transformation and the importance of humans | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
What role will we as human beings play in the digital world? A world in which robots perform monotonous physical labor faster and with fewer errors than humans.A world in which artifi...
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Radio 4 - The Digital Human - Available now

Radio 4 - The Digital Human - Available now | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Aleks Krotoski explores the digital world...
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Google Hangout: "Hey Google: How Will Google Assistant Change Learning on the Job" (Thursday July 26, 2018 12:00PM EDT) from @futureworkplace on @Webvent - Future Workplace Webinars

Google Hangout: "Hey Google: How Will Google Assistant Change Learning on the Job" (Thursday July 26, 2018 12:00PM EDT) from @futureworkplace on @Webvent - Future Workplace Webinars | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Future Workplace is an HR Executive Network and research firm dedicated to providing insights on the future of learning and working.
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Domestic Crude Digital Collection Now Available | University of Houston Libraries

Domestic Crude Digital Collection Now Available | University of Houston Libraries | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
University of Houston Libraries Website...
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Creativity and performance | Digital Creativity in Coventry Libraries | Coventry City Council

Learn more about Digital Creativity in Coventry Libraries...
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Safeguarding society in the digital age: The Intelligence Network

Safeguarding society in the digital age: The Intelligence Network | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
BAE Systems, Vodafone and CyLon have formed a collaborative taskforce for safeguarding society in the digital age: The Intelligence Network...
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Symposium on Digital Research into Media and Politics: International and Hong Kong Studies

Symposium on Digital Research into Media and Politics: International and Hong Kong Studies | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Co-organized by the Journalism and Media Studies Centre and Society of Hong Kong Studies   Date:     Friday, August 24, 2018 Venue:  Social Sciences Chamber, 11/F, The Jockey Club Tower, Centennial Campus, The University of Hong Kong Free admission. Please register here.   Introduction Digital media platforms are increasingly the places where people engage in politics and with the news. How people talk about public affairs online and act on political matters can potentially shed light on issues of political behaviour, dynamics of public opinion formation, the rise of collective and connective actions, etc. Meanwhile, the study of actions and talks in cyberspace present a range of new methodological opportunities as well as challenges. This symposium brings together researchers who have been engaging in the study of digital media and politics in Hong Kong, China, and the East Asian region to introduce their research projects and/or share their research findings. The aim is to showcase how a variety of available methodological approaches – ranging from conventional surveys to various “digital methods” – can be employed to address issues of theoretical and empirical significance. The symposium shall also provide a platform for interested academics and graduate students to discuss the potential and possible caveats in the study of digital media and politics.   09:30—09:45  Opening Remarks 09:45—11:00  Panel 1 — Research into Media and Politics: From Traditional Survey to Digital Methods Identity, ideology, and social media King-wa Fu, The University of Hong Kong Cassius Chow, The University of Hong Kong Y. L. Ng, The University of Hong Kong Divide et Impera: How cyberbalkanized social media tear apart our society Chung-hong Chan, University of Mannheim A comparative analysis of social media news engagement in Asia Michael C.M. Chan, The Chinese University of Hong Kong Hsuan-ting Chen, The Chinese University of Hong Kong Francis L.F. Lee, The Chinese University of Hong Kong 11:00—11:30  Coffee Break 11:30—12:45  Panel 2 — Digital Politics in China and Beyond Machine-learning sinology: Bridging the qualitative-quantitative divide with big data Christian Göbel, University of Vienna The connective logic of discourse building in networked activism: Computational text analysis of Facebook comments during candlelight movement in South Korea Shin-Haeng Lee, Sejong University Using smog-related data of Chinese Sina Weibo to explore correlation between health issues and relevant regions Nicolas Turenne, Université Paris-Est Marne-la-Vallée 12:45—14:10  Lunch 14:10—14:15  Remarks on the Afternoon Session 14:15—15:45  Panel 3 — Digital Research on Contentious Politics In between collective and connective actions: Issue framing in a social media age King-wa Fu, The University of Hong Kong Edmund Cheng, Hong Kong Baptist University Samson Yuen, Lingnan University Facebooking nationalism: The construction of Hong Kong nationalism on Facebook Justin Ho, The University of Edinburgh The strategies and efficacy of protest movements in Hong Kong in the digital age Marko Skoric, City University of Hong Kong The causal impact of the Hong Kong’s Umbrella Movement on online swearing Hai Liang, The Chinese University of Hong Kong Gary K.Y. Tang, The Chinese University of Hong Kong 15:45—16:15  Coffee Break 16:15—17:45  Panel 4 — Digital Research on Public Opinion and Media Discourses An evolutionary model of opinion diversity Junior Zhu, The University of Hong Kong Tracking censorship of WeChat public accounts in China: A computational social science approach Yun Tai, The University of Hong Kong The impact of social media campaign on electoral performance: A study of the 2016 Hong Kong Legislative Council election Gary K.Y. Tang, The Chinese University of Hong Kong News sentiment and public engagement: An analysis of political news posts and Facebook comments in political events Yunya Song, Hong Kong Baptist University Nick Zhang, Hong Kong Baptist University 17:45—18:30  Round Table   Co-organized by Journalism and Media Studies Centre, The University of Hong Kong Founded in 1999, the Journalism and Media Studies Centre (JMSC) of The University of Hong Kong offers professional journalism education at Asia’s premier university with classroom instruction by a faculty of experienced journalists and media scholars and internship opportunities at many of the world’s leading media companies. Society for Hong Kong Studies The Society for Hong Kong Studies (SHKS) is a non-profit, non-political, independent professional association based in Hong Kong. Formed in 2017 by more than 230 academics in 21 countries, the SHKS serves as a global platform for the multi-disciplinary and inter-institutional study of Hong Kong. Hong Kong’s relevance to many academic fields goes far beyond its minuscule geographical presence. SHKS is committed to enhancing the international visibility of Hong Kong studies, facilitating intellectual exchanges across academic disciplines, nurturing the research capacity of scholars and students, transferring scientific knowledge to the local and international communities, and developing new scholarships to understand Hong Kong in relation to China, Asia and beyond.​ An affiliate of the Association for Asian Studies, SHKS has developed collaborative relationships with other initiatives devoted to Hong Kong Studies. These include the Hong Kong Institute for the Humanities and Social Sciences at the University of Hong Kong, the Hong Kong Studies Initiatives at the University of British Columbia, and the Academy of Hong Kong Studies at the Hong Kong Education University. For enquiries, please contact Benjamin Lam at the Society of Hong Kong Studies, benjaminlamht@hkstudies.org. Free admission. Please register here.
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Risky digital behavior among Nordic youth - the case of social media drug dealing

A one-day conference at University of Copenhagen, 28 September 2018. Parts of the conference will be streamed.
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Smart cities: Digital solutions for a more livable future | McKinsey & Company

Smart cities: Digital solutions for a more livable future | McKinsey & Company | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Until recently, city leaders thought of smart technologies primarily as tools for becoming more efficient behind the scenes. Now technology is being injected more directly into the lives of residents. Smartphones have become the keys to the city, putting instant information about transit, traffic, health services, safety alerts, and community news into millions of hands.


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David Hain's curator insight, July 17, 5:36 AM

Do you live in a 'smart city'? Get the McKinsey lowdown on what that could mean here.

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How museums are using immersive digital experiences | ViMM

How museums are using immersive digital experiences | ViMM | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
It is common knowledge that many art galleries and museums are finding it tough to market to younger, digitally-oriented generations. Although millennials ‘enjoy museums’, they have also ‘expressed concern that the content and mission of many museums may not be in sync with millennials’ interest and values’, according to millennialmarketing.com. A report by the Department of Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS), revealed DCMS-sponsored museums and galleries saw an overall 0.8% decline in visitor numbers in 2016/17 compared to 2015/16. Many major institutions within this group contributed to this decline, including the National Portrait Gallery (down 11%), the National History Museum (down 14%) and the V&A (down 12%), amongst others. As a frequent visitor of art galleries in central London, I am often surprised by the lack of interactive digital content to aid learning, exploration and navigation. It is common to find an occasional static touchscreen in a corner, which will contain pages of dry information about certain paintings and collections, perhaps accompanied by a couple of images. This is hardly inspiring, particularly in the eyes of individuals who belong to the millennial and Z generations, for whom technology has become the very centre of their daily lives. It is obvious that managers and curators need to take seriously the interest and retention of these generations so as to secure a bright future for their organisations. Incorporating digital technology within the physical gallery space is one such way to do this, providing more interactive and engaging platforms from which visitors of all ages can learn. Whilst it appears that most galleries have a lot to catch up on in this regard, a handful stand out as pioneers of integrating traditional art forms with modern digital culture. I’ve picked out some of the best examples below: AUGMENTED REALITY AS AN AID Detroit Institute of Arts – Lumin AR Tour The Detroit Institute of Arts is a fantastic example of how organisations can use Augmented Reality to improve both the educational and practical aspects of visiting galleries and museums. They introduced the ‘Lumin AR Tour’ in 2017, which can be implemented on a handheld device available inside the building. By pointing the device at certain sculptures, paintings and artifacts, you can learn more about them. Pop-up snippets of information, detailed descriptions and additional photographs of the item (and related items) are just a few of the features included to aid further learning. One of the most interesting highlights is the option to ‘x-ray’ an ancient mummy, giving users the ability to view both the exterior and interior of the object in front of them. The ‘Lumin AR’ tool can also be used for navigation. Simply touch an area of the interactive map that you would like to visit, and dots will appear on the floor through the screen, guiding you to that area from your current location.      The tour currently functions in seven sections of their gallery space, and the gallery intends to roll it out to the entire site in the near future.   INTERACTIVE CREATIVE SPACES Cleveland Museum of Art – ArtLens Interactive Studio The Cleveland Museum of Art has taken interactivity to the next level with their ArtLens Studio Play. The studio, based in a room within the gallery, contains a variety of screen-based activities that require physical movement of the body to operate. Throughout the room, some activities you can expect to participate in include: virtual painting virtual collaging with items found in the gallery collections (to create new artwork) researching and learning about various featured artists and disciplines using both static and portable devices front camers self-portraiture with the ability to edit with artistic effects virtual pottery drawing shapes and matching them (via AI) to items in the gallery database Although interactive displays are becoming more commonplace in many galleries and museums, they are often produced tentatively and scarcely, with limited capabilities. This example from the Cleveland Museum of Art defies conventions of the standard, arguably dated static touchscreen display by involving the movement of the body as a means of control. Not only is this method more immersive for the user, but it is also a more social and collaborative way of learning more about the collections. Visitors have the opportunity to create their own works of art which are then uploaded to the gallery’s official Tumblr page to download and share later.     IMMERSIVE EXHIBITIONS National Museum of Singapore – ‘Story of the Forest’ I was lucky enough to stumble upon this exhibition housed within Singapore’s National Museum when I visited on holiday in October 2017. The installation had quite an unassuming exterior, with very little information about it displayed at the entrance. Regardless of whether this was deliberate or not, it certainly made the whole experience more surprising upon entering. This incredibly immersive and colourful exhibition takes you on a sloping, spiralised walk down to a main dome at the centre. On the walls of the path are large screens that hug the curvature of the walls, making the visuals seamless at eye-level. An animated display of a forest scene is projected from the screens, inviting the viewer to spot various animals in the foreground and background. You can then use the ‘Story of the Forest’ App on your mobile device to find out more about certain animals in front of you, including habitat, diet and levels of endangerment. This can also be performed in the main dome area of the exhibit, where additionally you can lie down and take in a breath-taking view of the ceiling that features cascading spores and plants.     More images can be found on TeamLab’s website – (I’ll save you the holiday photos). If you ever have the chance to visit, I highly recommend it. Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), NYC – ‘Hello, We’re From the Internet’ (unofficial) According to their website, the exhibition ‘is an unauthorised gallery concept aimed at democratizing physical exhibition spaces, museums, and the curation of art within them.’ ‘Hello, We’re From the Internet’ was created by a group of eight internet artists at the MoMA in New York City, and used augmented reality to overlay their animated content over the artworks featured in the Jackson Pollock section of the gallery. This content could be accessed through a mobile app available on Android and iOS. The exhibition has been claimed a protest against elitism that art galleries arguably represent. As with any establishment – be they media, church or government – the richest of galleries are canonized, to the point where the public’s role and contribution is reduced to passive observer. If we are to understand that art is the great measure of our culture we must also acknowledge it is owned, valued and defined by ‘the elite’. We must also recognize then that the term “open to the public” is not an invitation, but a declaration of values. Values that are not our own. And so it has remained for 335 years. Until now. Politics aside, this ‘hijacking’ dramatically increased the popularity of this particular collection, as evidenced by the number of visitors interacting with the app in the video below. It is a risky but interesting way of drawing attention to social issues via virtual vandalisation. TAKE A TOUR IN VIRTUAL REALITY The Google Arts and Culture app, available on iOS and Android is like Google Street View for galleries and places of cultural interest. It can be implemented on mobile devices when viewing selected museum websites, and allows the user to explore highlights or entire floors of these buildings in virtual reality. Let’s take the tour of the Dulwich picture gallery as an example. You can browse 652 high resolution images of artworks using Google Arts and Culture, which are organised by style, medium and top trending. Users are also able to take a tour around the gallery’s rooms in virtual reality, with the ability to select images to view in close-up from the room they are currently based. There is no doubt that this can be appealing to users of the app, particularly if you are on a different continent to the gallery or museum in question. You are transported there in an instant, and can view the gallery at your leisure, without any other visitors getting in the way of your experience. It could also aid a decision to visit a gallery in real life; for example if you were planning a holiday itinerary, However, it could arguably ruin any later physical experience of the space, as it would be devoid of any surprise elements. Is virtual access to galleries, and the ability to share images of artwork online extinguishing the public’s desire to visit? It is a possibility, however some argue the opposite.  Jia Jia Fei, Director of Digital at the Jewish Museum in NYC, believes that sharing these images and experiences online actively encourages others to visit those museums and galleries in real life. In a 2015 TedX talk, she speaks about her experience with a James Turrell exhibition at the Guggenheim Museum, where she once worked as Associate Director – Digital Marketing: Does the rapid digitisation of images reduce the experience you have? Is it reductive, or does it expand the meaning of that experience and object in an entirely new form, thereby reaching millions of people outside of the physical space who can never physically come to the museum? …In the age of the internet, we only have something to gain by creating access; opening up access to photography, opening up access to our intellectual content and making these images available for the public. I’m often asked, ‘will the digital experience and the digital representation of the museum online through social media ever replace the onsite physical experience?’ … the James Turrell exhibition, with an incredible digital footprint, also brought in over 420,000 visitors who wanted to come to the museum to see it for themselves because they saw it on Instagram. …We’re opening up the opportunity for anyone in the world with an internet connection to learn about art, which is essentially the mission of the museum. Source: Lizzy Hillier @ ecostaltancy.com
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Digital Humanities, Service to Graduate Students and Why Future Academic Librarians Should Care –

Digital Humanities, Service to Graduate Students and Why Future Academic Librarians Should Care – | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
This article presents a brief overview of the digital humanities and the reasons why future academic librarians ought to pay attention to it, and focuses on a somewhat neglected area of service&#82…...
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New Digital literacy in libraries: joining the dots – Insights from Kate Lomax –

New Digital literacy in libraries: joining the dots – Insights from Kate Lomax – | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
https://princh.com/digital-literacy-in-libraries-joining-the-dots-insights-from-kate-lomax/  ...
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Strengthening digital society against cyber shocks

Strengthening digital society against cyber shocks | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Massive cybersecurity breaches have become almost commonplace, but many organizations still struggle to manage emerging cyber risks in an increasingly complex digital society.
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Hacking: Digital Media and Technological Determinism (DMS – Digital Media and Society) –

Hacking: Digital Media and Technological Determinism (DMS – Digital Media and Society) – | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Hacking: Digital Media and Technological Determinism (DMS – Digital Media and Society) – Kindle edition by Tim Jordan.Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or …...
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The Cyber Society — ITSPmagazine | Cybersecurity & Infosec News | At the Intersection of IT Security & Society™

The Cyber Society — ITSPmagazine | Cybersecurity & Infosec News | At the Intersection of IT Security & Society™ | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
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Digital Research Commons Call for Projects | University of Houston Libraries

Digital Research Commons Call for Projects | University of Houston Libraries | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
University of Houston Libraries Website...
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Showcase Your Library's Digital Collections With Quartex

Showcase Your Library's Digital Collections With Quartex | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Libraries, archives, and other cultural heritage organizations in need of a platform to publish their digital collections--one that doesn't require an IT staff to run--can look no further: Adam Matthew's new solution, Quartex, is out now.
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Museums should negotiate the Digital

Museums should negotiate the Digital | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
A view of the special exhibition on Japan and Cardiff at National Museum of Wales, Cardiff. Photographed by Joyoti RoyDigital is a confusing word.More so, bec...
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We need to talk about the digital humanities job

We need to talk about the digital humanities job | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Dr James O’Sullivan, a lecturer in digital arts and humanities at University College Cork, explains why institutions need to think very carefully about the demarcation between public and digital humanities, because while they are related, they are not necessarily the same thing.
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Technology May Seek To Flatten The World, But The "Digital South" Will Chart Its Own Course

Technology May Seek To Flatten The World, But The "Digital South" Will Chart Its Own Course | Digital Collaboration and the 21st C. | Scoop.it
Let's hope the Silicon Valley CEOs and the citizen advocates and regulators who are working hard to re-build trust in digital technology are inclusive in their thinking, innovating and planning.Otherwise, they will end up solving the problems for a narrow portion of the digital planet...
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