Different Wines from Different Regions
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Different Wines from Different Regions
Various production techniques, flavor profiles, and more about wines from all over
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Grape expectations in New Zealand - Herald Sun

Grape expectations in New Zealand - Herald Sun | Different Wines from Different Regions | Scoop.it
Grape expectations in New ZealandHerald SunIN 1973, in Marlborough on New Zealand's South Island, the region's first wine-grape vine was planted with a silver dollar beneath it for good luck.
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Burned Winery Sells Again - 1011now

Burned Winery Sells Again - 1011now | Different Wines from Different Regions | Scoop.it
Burned Winery Sells Again1011nowRising from the ashes, Miletta Vista Winery held its first post-fire sale Saturday. Mick and Loretta McDowell have been working to rebuild since a fire destroyed both their home and their business in late June.
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Wine: Best vintages for gift-giving - Post-Bulletin

Wine: Best vintages for gift-giving - Post-Bulletin | Different Wines from Different Regions | Scoop.it
San Francisco ChronicleWine: Best vintages for gift-givingPost-BulletinThere are a couple of things to consider in giving wine. The first is price. In a perfect world, giving a really excellent wine would be the only criterion.

 

An appropriate article with the holiday season coming up, this discusses the Do's and Dont's of giving wine as a gift.  The first thing one needs to look at when buying wine to give as a gift is a price.  While everyone would love to give an excellent and expensive wine, not all can afford it.  Thus, you first need to pick a price range, then choose the best wine from there.  Giving a very cheap wine will make you look like a crappy friend/co-worker/etc., while giving something too expensive may make the receiver uncomfortable.  

 

Next, while the screw-cap is getting to be used much more on wines, even high-quality ones, giving a wine with a screw cap as a gift may give the impression that the wine is not high-quality and that you spent very little on it.  Unless the receiver of the wine is knowledgeable in wine-tasting and will really appreciate the wine (if it actually is high quality), one should not give a screw-cap wine. 

 

The article gives a number of recommendations of great gift wines at different price points, under $30, $30-$49, and $50 and over.  

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Enosocial's curator insight, May 16, 2017 11:52 AM

Wine: Best vintages for gift-giving - Post-Bulletin

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New York Wine & Culinary Center teams up with NY community colleges - MPNnow.com

New York Wine & Culinary Center teams up with NY community colleges - MPNnow.com | Different Wines from Different Regions | Scoop.it
New York Wine & Culinary Center teams up with NY community collegesMPNnow.comRepresentatives from the New York Wine & Culinary Center and nine New York community colleges held a brainstorming session Friday at the center to discuss opportunities...

 

The New York Wine and Culinary Center, a non-profit better known as the NYWCC, aims to educate both visitors and locals about New York's agriculture, wine, and food industries. It has recently met with nine community colleges across the state of New York with enology, viticulture, culinary, and hospitality programs to start a collaboration or partnership.  

 

All of the different groups are learning from each other.  For instance, schools are learning about different curriculum from other schools.  The NYWCC is learning how to better collaborate with schools by offering internships, hosting college fairs, and providing scholarships.  The schools will also be able to learn from the NYWCC by being able to use their facilities and having the center's faculty come give presentations and lectures to the colleges' students.  It seems like this "Community College Connection", as they are calling it, will be extremely beneficial to all parties involved, and will help continue to grow the wine industry in the New York state.  

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Parish releases Grand Reserve barley wine ale - NOLA.com

Parish releases Grand Reserve barley wine ale - NOLA.com | Different Wines from Different Regions | Scoop.it
NOLA.comParish releases Grand Reserve barley wine aleNOLA.comAndrew Godley, founder of Broussard's Parish brewery, must be relieved that his new limited-release Grand Reserve barley wine ale has finally been shipped off to the distributor.

 

Parish brewery in Broussard, Louisiana just released the Grand Reserve barley wine ale, which is basically like a beer with wine qualities.  With a higher alcohol content of most beers, at 11% and the fact that it requires time to age in the bottle, this beer has some definite qualities that are normally seen with wine.  Because of these characteristics and the bottle conditioning, the founder of Parish brewery, Andrew Godley, expects the beer to be able to hold in the bottle for 5 years.  Parish only expects to brew one batch of Grand Reserve per year, and release it in limited amounts. 

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'Wine Loans' Squeeze Liquidity from Your Cellar - CNBC.com

'Wine Loans' Squeeze Liquidity from Your Cellar - CNBC.com | Different Wines from Different Regions | Scoop.it
CNBC.com'Wine Loans' Squeeze Liquidity from Your CellarCNBC.com“Collectors want to have optimum conditions,” says Burton, a former property developer and life-long wine collector who got into the wine brokerage business about two years ago.

 

This has to be my favorite article that I've read about wine so far.  It combines my love for wine with my love for finance.  Stephen Burton, the founder of wine brokerage firm Bordeaux Cellars, has come up with a new, and extremely fascinating idea: lending against wine.  Basically, there are a lot of people out there with incredible collections of wine in private cellars but who are in need of short-term loans.  Then there are others who are willing to provide these loans for some sort of collateral.  Well, what if the collateral was really, really good wine? That's what Steve Burton has figured out, and now he is matching the lenders with the borrowers, and finding places with the perfect conditions to store the collateral (AKA wine).  As a wine expert, Burton knows what wine to lend against.  Since the beginning of his operation, he's arranged approximately $26M loans.  Pretty neat concept!

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Residue testing of wine grapes now mandatory - Times of India

Residue testing of wine grapes now mandatory - Times of India | Different Wines from Different Regions | Scoop.it
Residue testing of wine grapes now mandatoryTimes of IndiaPUNE: Test your grapes before brewing your wine.

 

After facing criticism of having chemical residue in a number of wine's exported from its region, India has now put in a new regulation that forces wineries to undergo double-testing.  They must first send samples of grapes from their region before beginning to harvest them to the National Research Centre for Grapes, where the testing machinery is.  The vineyard cannot begin to harvest the grapes until they receive clearance from the center.  The second test will be done on the wine itself.  If there is chemical residue in the wine, as has been found to be true of many Indian wines, the winery will be forced to bring down their residue level.  Until the wineries pass both tests, they are not allowed to distribute any of their wines.  

 

Before this new regulation, only table grapes were forced to be tested (not wine grapes).  Now that the wine grapes are being tested, an online platform called "winenet" is used to track the bottles of wine (through bar codes) and can trace the wines back to their regions, the grapes in those regions, the farmer that grew the grapes, the purchaser of the grapes, and other very detailed information about the wine.  With this online platform, it makes it much easier to regulate the new grape and wine testing and to come after those who illegally make wine or harvest grapes without first passing the test.  

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The Great Chicago Wine Bar Search: After 18 Years, Webster's Is Still Pouring ... - ChicagoNow (blog)

The Great Chicago Wine Bar Search: After 18 Years, Webster's Is Still Pouring ... - ChicagoNow (blog) | Different Wines from Different Regions | Scoop.it

ChicagoNow (blog)The Great Chicago Wine Bar Search: After 18 Years, Webster's Is Still Pouring ...ChicagoNow (blog)Finally, after a year of great wine bar searches my journey leads me to the “granddaddy of them all” Webster's Wine Bar (1480 W...

 


As a big fan of Chicago, I had to read about what was said to be the "granddaddy" of all wine bars: Webster's Wine Bar.  Established in 1994, it has been around for nearly 18 years, longer than almost any other wine bar in the city.  What has kept it around so long? Well the owner, Janan Asfour, claims its their love for wine, and the fact that they try to please any type of customer, whether they are a beginner in wine or a wine connouseiur.  The wine bar offers wine classes for all different levels of wine knowledge, and has a renowned staff who have traveled to various wine-regions around the world and share their experiences and their knowledge of cuisine, wine-making, and cultures.  

 

Webster's offers over 40 different wines by the glass and has over 500 reserve wines from smaller, family wineries.  Because of the uniqueness, grandness, and largeness of their wine selection, along with their casual, comfortable, yet unpretentious setting, they keep customers coming in and coming back.  

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DNA sleuth hunts wine roots in Anatolia - Phys.Org

DNA sleuth hunts wine roots in Anatolia - Phys.Org | Different Wines from Different Regions | Scoop.it

DNA sleuth hunts wine roots in AnatoliaPhys.OrgToday Turkey is home to archaeological sites as well as vineyards of ancient grape varieties like Bogazkere and Okuzgozu, which drew the curiosity of the Swiss botanist and grape DNA sleuth Jose Vouillamoz,...

 

It has been discovered that Anatolia, a region in the Fertile Crescent and the Asian part of modern Turkey, is the birthplace of 100s of today's grape's founder varieties.  Thus, many of the European grapes are traced to these ancient grapes in the Middle East, and that the related ones must have all been introduced in relatively same places and same times. Anatolia is also known as the birthplace of 8 "founder crops" from chickpea to barley. 

 

The ancient grapes can be traced back to between 5000 and 8500 BC.  Anatolia, along with being the ground where many of today's grapes first originated, also played a large role in ancient winemaking, as can be seen by ancient pottery and even older clay mineral containers.  

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Rabobank Report: Mexico, Brazil, Poland, Nigeria Are Potential High Growth ... - Sacramento Bee

Rabobank Report: Mexico, Brazil, Poland, Nigeria Are Potential High Growth ... - Sacramento Bee | Different Wines from Different Regions | Scoop.it
Rabobank Report: Mexico, Brazil, Poland, Nigeria Are Potential High Growth ...Sacramento Bee26, 2012 -- /PRNewswire/ -- Rabobank has published a new research report on the growth potential of emerging wine markets, identifying Mexico, Brazil, Poland...

 

Rabobank Group, a large and global financial services leader, has identified growth potential in four "hidden-gem" emerging markets for wine.  Outside of the more traditional emerging wine markets in China and South Korea, Rabobank identifies Mexico, Brazil, Poland, and Nigeria having high potential for growth of wine demand in the future.  While China and South Korea are more "safe", if wine exporters and suppliers managed their risks appropriately, entering the "hidden gem" markets could have an extremely positive return for them and could give them an advantage in terms of first-mover and getting their brand name out early.

 

As Mexico's middle-class has seen population growth, the country has seen improved wine consumption trends as well as growing demand.  As for Brazil, many domestic producers in Brazil are not producing the quality and caliber of wine that is demanded, and thus imports of wine into that country grew by nearly 30% from 2007-2011.  Poland, being a less risky option due to less corruption, has also seen growth in demand and imports, and could prove lucrative to many wine producers and suppliers.  Finally, while Nigeria's market may be the riskiest of the hidden gems due to social conflict, its large population and strategic petroleum reserves create a very strong foundation for economic growth and increased wine demand, as wine imports have already been growing by a 16% CAGR the last few years.  

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The best of West Coast sparkling wine - San Francisco Chronicle

The best of West Coast sparkling wine - San Francisco Chronicle | Different Wines from Different Regions | Scoop.it
San Francisco ChronicleThe best of West Coast sparkling wineSan Francisco ChronicleOur top picks reflect the best efforts for value - wines that featured quality fruit and finesse in their texture, an often overlooked aspect to sparkling wine.

 

The holidays are coming up, and sparkling wines are always a big presence in many families' homes this time of year.  The author of this article chooses some great sparkling wines that are good not only in taste, but in value as well.  Brut sparkling wine, the article states, is the perfect holiday wine, with the bubbles, its versitility, and its crispness (in comparison to sparkling moscato, which is better known for its sweetness).  Because the harvests in 2010 and 2011 turned out some underripe fruit due to cold weather, many more sparkling wines were made during these vintages, as underripe fruit can be used in sparkling wines.  Thus, it's the perfect time of the year (and the perfect year) to stock up on sparkling wines and enjoy over the holidays for a great value.  

 

A few sparkling wine suggestions include 2008 Argyle Brut Willamette Valley Sparkling and the 2005 Mumm Napa DVX Napa Valley Sparkling.  

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Wales Manor Winery in McKinney offered reality TV show amid growing popularity - Pegasus News

Wales Manor Winery in McKinney offered reality TV show amid growing popularity - Pegasus News | Different Wines from Different Regions | Scoop.it
Wales Manor Winery in McKinney offered reality TV show amid growing popularityPegasus NewsAside from its homegrown wine varieties, Wales Manor has also gained notoriety for its concert series.

 

The owner of Wales Manor Winery in McKinney, TX, John "Josey" Wales, was recently approached by a Hollywood production company about possibly starting his own reality TV show.  Why, you may ask, would there be a reality show about a quiet winery? Well, Wales' "kind of out there personality" (as the article states it) and the winery's various events would apparently make for an entertaining show.

 

Wales Manor Winery often hosts weddings, concerts, and other social events and gatherings.  They have a concert series known as "Music Under the Stars", encouraging people to bring picnics and lawn chairs as they listen to great live music for only $10 a ticket.  Wales Manor rarely advertises, only doing so through word-of-mouth, some facebook, and through a newsletter.  Being a very traditional winery, they are only open on weekends and closed during the winter, and do not sell their wines in restaurants, stores, or the internet.  The only way people can try their wines is through a visit to the old-fashioned winery itself.  Now personally, I see a disconnect between the culture of the winery and having a reality TV show, but who knows.  It could be a success? 

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Listen Carefully: Tips from a Wine 'Therapist' - Wall Street Journal

Listen Carefully: Tips from a Wine 'Therapist' - Wall Street Journal | Different Wines from Different Regions | Scoop.it
Wall Street JournalListen Carefully: Tips from a Wine 'Therapist'Wall Street JournalAs someone who estimates that he's tasted nearly a million wines over three decades, he spots one that he doesn't like on the list.

 

Larry Stone is a master sommelier, which means that he is trained and knowledgeable about all types of wine, and works in the fine restaurants business, as most sommeliers do.  This article talks about his successes and the way in which being a sommelier is similar to that of a therapist.  At the fine restaurants that he has worked at, such as Rubicon in San Francisco and Charlie Trotter's in Chicago, he helps customers find wines that they will enjoy with their food.

 

As a master sommelier, Larry Stone has a knack for knowing what to bring out to the customers.  If he gets it wrong the first time (or more often if the customer does not articulate what he or she wants clearly), Mr. Stone will continue to bring out wines until the customer is happy.  Mr. Stone passed the Master Sommelier test after studying for only a few months, while many study for 4-6 years because they keep failing.  Further, he won a contest in Paris and was named the Best Sommelier in French Wines.  While the job certainly requires much hard work, an enormous amount of knowledge, and good stamina, Mr. Stone has always excelled and been able to make his customers happy by being a good listener and not pushing them too hard.  

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The Wine List of Summit Offers Ideas for Pairing Wine with Holiday Meals - TheAlternativePress.com (press release) (blog)

The Wine List of Summit Offers Ideas for Pairing Wine with Holiday Meals - TheAlternativePress.com (press release) (blog) | Different Wines from Different Regions | Scoop.it
TheAlternativePress.com (press release) (blog)The Wine List of Summit Offers Ideas for Pairing Wine with Holiday MealsTheAlternativePress.com (press release) (blog)Ivan Ruiz, certified sommelier and owner of The Wine List in Summit has the perfect...
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The Wine List of Summit Offers Ideas for Pairing Wine with Holiday Meals - TheAlternativePress.com (press release) (blog)

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Ont. vineyards expect major demand for 2012 crush - Manitoba Co-operator

Ont. vineyards expect major demand for 2012 crush - Manitoba Co-operator | Different Wines from Different Regions | Scoop.it
Ont. vineyards expect major demand for 2012 crushManitoba Co-operatorOntario's record grape harvest, coming in the midst of an expected global wine shortage, is seen providing the province's growers an "unprecedented opportunity" to expand their...

 

Continuing on with the trend I have so far seen for this year's grape harvest, Ontario has set records for not only quantity of grapes produced in this harvest but also in terms of the quality of the grapes.  While most of the wine-producing world is experiencing bad harvests (in terms of quantity) due to poor weather patterns in countries such as Italy, France, Argentina and Spain (to name a few), wine regions in North America are experiencing amazing harvests and setting records left and right.  

 

The net global shortage of grapes this year will lead to increasing prices in wine, creating a great opportunity for those regions (mostly in US and Canada) for exports and taking advantage of the higher prices and shortages.  Ontario's 2012 grape harvest produced 65,800 tons with a value of $88.3M, up from 64,500 tons at $78.7M in 2011.  Ontario's cooler climate allows for growth and production of varietals such as Chardonnay, Riesling, Merlot, Pinot Noir, and Cabernets.  

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The Grape Files: Sauvignon Blanc - Naturally in Niagara®

The Grape Files: Sauvignon Blanc - Naturally in Niagara® | Different Wines from Different Regions | Scoop.it
Naturally in Niagara®The Grape Files: Sauvignon BlancNaturally in Niagara®Sauvignon Blanc is a grape that is cultivated at fewer wineries in Niagara, but those that dare are doing incredible things.

 

Niagara wineries are not known to make Sauvignon Blanc because of the general need for warmer climate, but some wineries have tried it and seen marvelous success.  Even in a relatively cooler climate, with the right amount of care on the vineyard during its longer ripening season and during the winemaking process, the grapes can be made into an excellent Sauvignon Blanc.

 

Originating from the Bordeaux and Loire Valley regions in France, the Sauvignon Blanc in Niagara can be found in two primary forms.  Sauvignon Blanc is the first, and has a fruity taste with gooseberry notes.  The other form, Fume Blanc, is one that was aged in oak barrels. 

 

The Sauvignon Blancs coming from their origin regions in France are seen much more as dessert wines, whereas those coming from regions such as California, New Zealand, South Africa, and Chile are relatively more crisp and either fruity or grassy.  Pair the dessert-type wines with a blue-veined cheese.  Pair the fruity Sauvignon Blanc with white meat, shellfish, or oysters and pair the crisp and grassy Sauvignon Blancs with such items as asparagus or leafy green herbs.  Yum!

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Niagara wineries are not known to make Sauvignon Blanc because of the general need for warmer climate, but some wineries have tried it and seen marvelous success

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Prospects brighten for wine in Tenn. groceries - Seattle Post Intelligencer

Prospects brighten for wine in Tenn. groceries - Seattle Post Intelligencer | Different Wines from Different Regions | Scoop.it
Prospects brighten for wine in Tenn. groceriesSeattle Post IntelligencerNASHVILLE, Tenn.

 

Due to the increase in new GOP lawmakers and with the top two Republicans in the Tennessee Genral Assembly supporting allowing the sale of wine in grocery stores, the debate over this issue has grown.  Currently, in Tennessee, any type of alcohol that has alcoholic content stronger than that of beer, it must be sold in a liquor store, of which only 501 exist in the state.  Many are advocating for the sale of wine in grocery stores, and a number of lobbyists and politicians believe that if a majority vote were conducted in the state regarding the issue, it would certainly pass that grocery stores should sell wine.  One of the great slogans created around this debate is "Red, White, and Food", in favor of selling in grocery stores.  Pretty clever. 

 

As new committe assignments are being made in the House and Senate in both state and local government panels, many will be looking at this debate when making the appointments.  Those against the proposed action believe that it will undermine Tennessee's efforts to prevent underage drinking.  Because beer is already sold in grocery stores, I personally do not agree with this argument.  It will be interesting to see where the debate goes and whether Tennesseans will be able to buy their wine at their local grocery stores. 

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Good Wine Makes Good Neighbors - New York Times (blog)

Good Wine Makes Good Neighbors - New York Times (blog) | Different Wines from Different Regions | Scoop.it
Good Wine Makes Good NeighborsNew York Times (blog)We greeted each other politely, then and promised to share a glass of wine sometime. One morning this week I opened my door to find a tall brown bag, a bottle of cabernet sauvignon inside.

 

While this really has no new information about wine, it's just a simple and cute story about neighbors in New York City and about the way that wine can bring people together.  The author's old neighbors used to leave the author nice little culinary treats in brown paper bags outside the door.  When these old neighbors moved out and new neighbors moved in, the author and new neighbor promised to get to know each other over a glass of wine at some unidentified point in time.  After some time went by, the author opens up her door to find a bottle of cabarnet sauvignon in a brown bag with a note saying "Let's finally get together for that glass of wine next week".  I love how wine can bring almost-strangers together! 

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Good Wine Makes Good Neighbors - New York Times (blog)

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Economic Impact of Napa's Wine Industry More Than $13 Billion to Napa County - The Herald | HeraldOnline.com

Economic Impact of Napa's Wine Industry More Than $13 Billion to Napa County - The Herald | HeraldOnline.com | Different Wines from Different Regions | Scoop.it
Economic Impact of Napa's Wine Industry More Than $13 Billion to Napa CountyThe Herald | HeraldOnline.comST. HELENA, Calif.

 

The Napa Valley Vintners (NVV) have recently released that released a report detailing Napa Valley's wine industry and its value.  The report, titled The Economic Impact of Napa County's Wine and Grapes was written by Barbara Insel of Stonebridge Research and claims that Napa Valley's wine industry has an annual economic impact of nearly $13.3B.  Furthermore, it provides 46,000 full-time jobs both indirectly and directly.  Due to higher taxation on alcoholic products, the wine industry adds around $1.3B in tax revenue for the government.  Finally, tourism related to wine generates approximately $1B annually.  It is very obvious that Napa Valley has an incredibly valuable and large wine industry.  

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The Best Winter Wines For Holiday Food Pairings - Business Insider

The Best Winter Wines For Holiday Food Pairings - Business Insider | Different Wines from Different Regions | Scoop.it
Business InsiderThe Best Winter Wines For Holiday Food PairingsBusiness InsiderNo problem, says Doug Bell, national wine buyer for Whole Foods Market.

 

While I'm more about the red wines over the holidays (or sparkling!), this gives a nice rundown of some holiday "winter whites" to try. Many of them are Chardonnays, as Chardonnay is Americans' top choice in table wine.  Chardonnays mostly pair with chicken or fish, but sometimes veal as well.  For me though, I'm not a big white-meat person, so Chardonnay is probably not for me over the holidays.

 

Another recommendation that caugh my eye though is the honey-colored sweet white wines of Sauternes and Barsac in the Bordeaux region of France.  While I'm normally not into sweet wines, I've never heard of this variety and would love to try it.  It is apparently affected by the "noble rot" which is a fungus that concentrates the sugars and aromas in the wine.  While it doesn't sound too appetizing when you speak of it that way, a bottle of Chateau d'Yquem, is one such "fungus" wine that sells for hundreds for one bottle.  Not too shabby, eh?  I'll have to try some of that.. 

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Winemakers preserve wine with late pruning - The Australian

Winemakers preserve wine with late pruning - The Australian | Different Wines from Different Regions | Scoop.it

Winemakers preserve wine with late pruningThe AustralianNational viticulturist for the Treasury Wine Estates Paul Petrie will this week present his findings on the delayed pruning of grapevines at the Climate Change Research Strategy for Primary...

 

With the increasing talk about climate change and global warming, it has really affected certain industries, including the wine industry.  Australian grape growers have found a way to prevent the grapes from maturing and growing too fast, as they have done so due to the changes in the climate and to different weather patterns.  The grape growers have learned that pruning the grape vines a month later than usual will delay the growth of the grapes.  The only risk in doing so is that the timing of pruning the grape vines must be almost perfect, as if they were to wait too long or do it too early, the season will be pressured one way or the other.  

 

Why do the growers need to extend the growth pattern of grapes?  Well it's pretty obvious, but the growth and the weather patterns affecting that growth can significantly impact the quality of the wine.  Changing weather patterns also change the consistency of the wine robustness and flavor.  Those brands that rely on producing consistent flavors year after year could be negatively affected by such climate change.  To further discuss this problem, the Climate Change Research Strategy for Primary Industries will hold a conference to hear from winemakers and scientists of the wine industry.  

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I'm Thankful for... Thomas Fogarty Wines - Huffington Post

I'm Thankful for... Thomas Fogarty Wines - Huffington Post | Different Wines from Different Regions | Scoop.it
I'm Thankful for... Thomas Fogarty WinesHuffington PostAt this holiday season, the kind of wines I am most thankful for are those made by dedicated, small producers in relatively tiny quantities based on particular, distinctive vineyard sites.

 

The author of this blog, Richard Jennings, a wine writer and reviewer, chose to praise the wines coming from the Thomas Fogarty Winery, as a Thanksgiving "thanks".  Thomas Fogarty Winery is located in a very distinct vineyard site and is a smaller producer that makes many wines that the author deems ideal to pair with holiday foods.

 

Thomas Fogarty Winery, in the Santa Cruz Mountains AVA, was established as a commercial winery in 1981 and was founded by a professor of surgery at Stanford University, Dr. Thomas J. Fogarty.  Dr. Fogarty acts as the proprietor of the vineyard, while the two winemakers working there are Michael Martella and Nathan Kandler.  Dr. Fogarty also has a son, Tommy Fogarty, with whom the author of the blog was able to tour the winery and vineyard with.  He tasted many wines with Tommy, Nathan, and Michael, and was extremely impressed by the oldest chardonnay they tried from a reserve bottling in 1992, as well as the complex pinot noir from 1994. 

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Wine Words: Aging Potential | The Kitchn

Wine Words: Aging Potential | The Kitchn | Different Wines from Different Regions | Scoop.it
Aging Potential is a wine word often used when discussing higher end wines that one might hope to cellar to either enjoy at a later stage or to resell for investment purposes. The aging potential of a wine means the length of ...

 

Not all wines are meant for aging.  In fact, most of the wines produced in today's day in age are meant to be drunk within 6-12 months after bottling.  Aging potential is basically just the amount of time that the wine can sit in the bottle and hold up to be very enjoyable to drink.  Aging potential is directly related to quality.  As I said, most wines now have relatively low aging potential.  

 

There are other wines though that have significant aging potential.  These are the higher quality wines, and it can depend on what region it comes from, which vintage, and which grape is used.  Some of the wines with the best aging potential include Barolo and Barbaresco wines from the Piedmont region in Italy, as well as some of the "higher" wines coming from the Burgundy and Bordeaux regions in France.  

 

Other characteristics that surprisingly can really affect the aging potential include the type of bottle that the wine is stored in, the way in which the bottle is closed, as well as the actual storage environment of the wine.  Certain temperatures, humidities, vibrations, and lighting can hugely affect the aging of wine.  

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Three decades to take on the world - Sydney Morning Herald

Three decades to take on the world - Sydney Morning Herald | Different Wines from Different Regions | Scoop.it
Sydney Morning HeraldThree decades to take on the worldSydney Morning HeraldHohnen said the tasting was never meant to be a competition but a celebration of cabernet, arguably the world's greatest wine grape.

 

The chief winemaker, Rob Mann, at the Cape Mentelle vineyard and winery in Australia celebrated the 30th annual Cape Mentelle Cabernet Tasting.  As the cabernet is arguably the best grape varietal in the world, this is a very famous and celebrated event.  To celebrate the 30th year of the tasting, Mann invited David Hohnen to speak.  Hohnen founded Cape Mentelle 30 years ago and sold it to Champagne Veuve Clicuot in the early 2000s.  

 

Hohnen was extremely emotional and happy to be back at his winery, where he hadn't visited in a decade.  He was blown away because there were old, blown-up photographs of him and his brothers, when the vineyard was first founded, in the new tasting rooms.  When he spoke at the tasting, he commented on the change of the tasting from back then until now.  For instance, the first Cape Mentelle cabernet sauvignon that was widely available was the 1978 vintage in 1981, sold for only $4.50 (a premium at the time).  Nowadays, the prices (and quality) of the wines are much better.  The 2009 cab vintage is now sold for $89, and is said to be one of the best vintages of all time.  As for the better quality, this is due to better technology, such as machine that separates grapes from unwanted material other than grapes (MOG) so the wines are not diluted with such flavors.  

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Grape growers can sue USDA as Supreme Court stays out of the fight - Kansas City Star

Grape growers can sue USDA as Supreme Court stays out of the fight - Kansas City Star | Different Wines from Different Regions | Scoop.it
Christian Science MonitorGrape growers can sue USDA as Supreme Court stays out of the fightKansas City StarWASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court on Monday provided legal juice for growers who want to sue the U.S.

 

Delano Farms, Four Star Fruit, and Gerawan Farming are all grape growers who united in a joint lawsuit filed in November 2007 against the USDA (US Department of Agriculture) and a Fresno-based table grape commission over grapevine patents.  Many believe this commission has overextended its authority in terms of regulation rather than promotion of the grape growing.  On Monday November 26, the Supreme Court declined to review a lower court's ruling that the USDA's immunity from lawsuits be waived.  The research department of the USDA created the grapevine varieties that are the subject of the patent lawsuit, but the grape comission funded much of the research.

 

Thus, the USDA licensed three patents to the commission, and the commission then sublicensed these patents to the three nurseries mentioned above.  These nurseries were the sole authorized distributors of the grapes ("Sweet Scarlet", "Scarlet Royal", and "Autumn King" varieties).  The commission began asking growers that owned the Sweet Scarlet variety for license payments, but before any patent application was ever filed on the variety, some growers legally obtained the rights to the grapevine.  Thus, they are suing them in an effort to try to prove that the patents are in fact invalid and that the grapevines are open for public use.  

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