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DEVOPS, agilité, tests, déploiement, sécurité
Curated by Mickael Ruau
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A Manager's Introduction to the Rational Unified Process (RUP)

A Manager's Introduction to the Rational Unified Process (RUP) | DEVOPS | Scoop.it
This white paper overviews the Rational Unified Process (RUP), an evolutionary software development process. The RUP is a prescriptive, well-defined system development process, often used to develop systems based on object and/or component-based technologies. It is based on sound software engineering principles such as taking an iterative, requirements-driven, and architecture-centric approach to software development. It provides several mechanisms, such as relatively short-term iterations with well-defined goals and go/no-go decision points at the end of each phase, to provide management visibility into the development process.

Download: Manager's Introduction to the RUP (321K PDF)

Anyone interested in RUP is very likely also going to be interested in Disciplined Agile Delivery (DAD).
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Maximize Scrum with the Scrum Values: Commitment (Part 4 of 5)

Maximize Scrum with the Scrum Values: Commitment (Part 4 of 5) | DEVOPS | Scoop.it
We are in the home stretch.  This is the fourth in a five-part series about the Scrum values.
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Sécurité by-design : analyse des 3 grands principes

Dans chaque produit, application, système ou objet connecté la sécurité est un point clé. A l’occasion de la 11ème édition du Forum International Cybersécurité qui a pour thème la sécurité et la privacy by-design, retour sur trois des grands principes de la sécurité by-design, avec notre regard et notre expérience.
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Don't Pay to Acquire Your First Users ·

Don't Pay to Acquire Your First Users · | DEVOPS | Scoop.it
The best products are those that elegantly solve someone’s desperate need. Finding that need and the people who have it is a challenging but essential process for early-stage entrepreneurs. Don’t cheat yourself of these learnings by buying your first customers (directly or through ads). Instead, embrace the hustle and find ways to sell, distribute, and persuade without cash. The exercise of getting traction takes time away from product development, but it also makes you more likely to succeed in the long run.
Mickael Ruau's insight:

Most companies never get paid acquisition channels to work….Specifically, most companies are unable to profitably acquire paying users through ad networks such as Facebook Ads, Instagram Ads, and Google AdWords.

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Processus de modélisation — UML SysML

Processus de modélisation — UML SysML | DEVOPS | Scoop.it
Il existe différentes méthodes/processus pour partir de l'expression d'un besoin et arrivé à la réalisation d'un projet. Cependant nous utiliserons ici le processus 2TUP (2 tracks unified process) aussi appelé cycle en Y que j'ai découvert dans le livre de Pascal Roques « UML en action » voir le site de Pascal : http://www.dotnetguru2.org/proques/

L'utilisation de ce processus depuis quelques années m'a permis de gagner réellement en efficacité et en généricité.

La méthode 2TUP ne s'oppose pas au célèbre cycle en V qui décrit le processus global de réalisation d'un projet dans de nombreuses industries.

Elle apporte une méthodologie qui permet de disséquer un projet en plusieurs parties fortement réutilisables.
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Preparing Features for PI Planning - What Does it Mean for a Feature to be Ready?

Preparing Features for PI Planning - What Does it Mean for a Feature to be Ready? | DEVOPS | Scoop.it
Many teams struggle to let go of their waterfall, silo mentality when they first transition to agile ways-of-working. In particular they shy away from collaboratively working on the definition, evolution and implementation of their backlog items insisting on up-front definition of Features and Stories, and clean handovers between the Product Owners and the Development Teams. This is an issue that we see with all the various agile methods but which always seems to get compounded whenever teams try to scale. So what are the worst things you can do to compromise the agility of your program when using Features? In Part 3 of this series, Ian Spence provides guidance on what it means for a Feature to be Ready.
Mickael Ruau's insight:

This checklist, as shown in Figure 1, is also available as one of a set of 6 mini-checklist cards that together define the lifecycle of a Feature.

   

Figure 1: Checklist cards for Feature Evolution

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Méthodologie 2 Track Unified Process

2TUP est une méthode de gestion de projets de la famille du Processus Unifié (RUP...)

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Process Efficiency in Scrum - Why it Matters and How to Measure it

Process Efficiency in Scrum - Why it Matters and How to Measure it | DEVOPS | Scoop.it

In order for a team to improve process efficiency, they will have to stop multi-tasking and execute the Swarming: One-Piece Continuous Flow pattern. This is well known to radically increase the flow of story completion and is fundamental to lean production at Toyota.

Mickael Ruau's insight:

We want to abandon hours as a reporting tool for Scrum teams as data on over 60,000 teams in a Rally survey shows that the slowest teams use hours. The fastest teams use small stories, no tasking, and no hourly estimation. How can we estimate process efficiency for these teams?

Here is a simple way to calculate process efficiency for one story. If the velocity of the team is 50 and the story is 5 points then the real work time for the story can be estimated to be 5/50 of a sprint. If the story is started at the beginning of the sprint and finished at the end of the one week sprint then it uses 5 days of a 5-day sprint or 1 sprint. If we divide 5/50 by 1 we get 10%. Make that number more than 50% and you will double velocity.

Our Webside Scrum team is implementing this for our company and there are a few questions that come up:

Do we just count business work periods in the denominator? What about weekends?
We use an interrupt buffer? How do we handle interrupts.
Webside process efficiency is over 100% because we have lots of small stories that get implemented really fast. Should we use a weighted average so that larger stories count more?

As we implement this I will update the blog on our approach. Even discussing how to implement a process efficiency metric has caused my Scrum team to introduce more discipline into backlog management and execution of stories.

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How Complexity Changes Leadership

How Complexity Changes Leadership | DEVOPS | Scoop.it
A network structure allows for quick execution because leadership has empowered the teams to act without having to wait for a sign-off.
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Building a Scrum Master Community

Building a Scrum Master Community | DEVOPS | Scoop.it
If you are trying to achieve results with a group of Scrum Masters, and also building their capabilities, our experience may provide insights for you.
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Scrum Pitfalls Part I

Scrum Pitfalls Part I | DEVOPS | Scoop.it
These are several typical missteps that keep both new and experienced Scrum teams from reaching their full potential. This course reviews the most common pitfalls we see our clients encounter. We will discuss ways to recognize and avoid these traps in advance.

See Scrum Pitfalls II which examines Impediment removal and the role of Leadership.
Mickael Ruau's insight:

The iterative nature of Scrum is a risk management mechanism that, even when poorly implemented, usually results in at least a 30% improvement in productivity. The rules of Scrum are simple and straightforward, and the underlying principles are intuitive. That is not to say, however, that Scrum is free of pitfalls. In this course, Scrum Pitfalls I, we discuss topics relating to User Stories not truly Ready and Done.

The Scrum Inc team covers:

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Advanced Topic – Right-Sizing Features for SAFe Program Increments – Scaled Agile Framework

Aren’t Features Just Big Stories? It’s very tempting for Product Managers and Product Owners to treat features as if they are just giant user stories, and in doing so, apply the same techniques for splitting user stories to slicing features. We have also learned that applying ‘user story voice’ to features is also not a good practice. So, what’s good for user stories, is not always good for features.

 

© Scaled Agile, Inc.
Include this copyright notice with the copied content.

Read the FAQs on how to use SAFe content and trademarks here:
https://www.scaledagile.com/about/about-us/permissions-faq/
Explore Training at:
https://www.scaledagile.com/training/calendar/

Mickael Ruau's insight:

In SAFe, a clear distinction is made between the purpose, structure and content of features, and that of stories (including enablers), for example: Features are visible ‘units’ of business intent that the customer recognizes, and it’s at this level of detail that the customer is able to prioritize their needs. Features may span multiple user roles, stories and use cases. Multiple teams may work on the same feature, swarming together to deliver them quickly. Although features may take multiple iterations to develop, they should be easily completed within a PI. Remember features are to the PI, as stories are to an iteration. Stories are used to incrementally implement new features and deliver new functionality. Stories help the team (and their stakeholders) examine, discuss, agree and sequence the work they believe is needed to deliver a feature. Stories should be sized to fit within a single two-week iteration. Stories can exist without parent features, allowing teams to make local decisions. There are a number of ways to split stories, two of our favorites being those published by Richard Lawrence (including his popular story splitting poster) and Dean Leffingwell (see the story article on this website). These techniques significantly help teams in the identification, splitting, and sequencing of the stories needed to implement a feature, however, they are not as helpful when it comes to slicing features. For example, we would never recommend deferring the performance requirements related to a feature into a later feature—although we may only implement these ‘performance stories’ towards the end of development of that feature. The same logic applies to handling error flows, CRUD [1] and data variations. We may delay stories which implement these important feature attributes toward the end of its development, but we should not defer this work into a separate feature. When slicing features, it is always important to remember that its implementation should always provide a robust, usable solution to the end-users. Features will be built story by story, but a complete usable solution means ‘no bits missing,’ rather than that all possible stories have been implemented.

 

© Scaled Agile, Inc.
Include this copyright notice with the copied content.

Read the FAQs on how to use SAFe content and trademarks here:
https://www.scaledagile.com/about/about-us/permissions-faq/
Explore Training at:
https://www.scaledagile.com/training/calendar/

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The Agile Unified Process (AUP) Home Page

The Agile Unified Process (AUP) Home Page | DEVOPS | Scoop.it

Overview

is a simplified version of the Rational Unified Process (RUP). It describes a simple, easy to understand approach to developing business application software using agile techniques and concepts yet still remaining true to the RUP. I've tried to keep the Agile UP as simple as possible, both in its approach and in its description. The descriptions are simple and to the point, with links to details (on the web) if you want them. The approach applies agile techniques include test driven development (TDD), Agile Model Driven Development (AMDD), agile change management, and database refactoring to improve your productivity.

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Three Concepts for Value Stream Mapping

Three Concepts for Value Stream Mapping | DEVOPS | Scoop.it
One of the first tools to use when looking at process improvements for any type of work is a value stream map. This tool can usually be used to find substantial and immediate improvements to process efficiency even before considering any Agile Work practices. There are only a few basic concepts to understand before jumping in…
Mickael Ruau's insight:


Value Stream Mapping Basic Concept One: Touch Time and Cycle Time

Touch time is the amount of time people actually spend working on a task: building, thinking, breaking, writing etc. but excluding the time they break for coffee, writing emails, waiting for answers to questions etc. Cycle time is the overall time people are working on a task from the moment they take responsibility for that task to the moment they hand off their results and no longer have responsibility.

Value Stream Mapping Basic Concept Two: Value Added and Non Value Added

Value added tasks are those that actually add value to the end result. The opposite, non value added, is also known as muda or waste.

Value Stream Mapping Basic Concept Three: Be Brutal, Be Conservative

Be brutal and conservative when deciding the touch time vs. cycle time for an activity or when trying to decide if an activity is value added or not. Typically an organization starts out with about 80% of all of their processes being waste of various sorts. Look at your value stream map and try to classify about 80% of it as non value added or cycle time overhead.

Value Stream Mapping Process Step Template

Here is a nicely formatted template you can use for tracking your tasks in a value stream map in three formats:

OpenOffice.org
Value Stream Map Process Step Template

Microsoft Excel
Value Stream Map Process Step Template

Adobe PDF
Value Stream Map Process Step Template

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Maximize Scrum with the Scrum Values: Courage (Part 3 of 5)

Maximize Scrum with the Scrum Values: Courage (Part 3 of 5) | DEVOPS | Scoop.it
This is the third in a five-part series about the Scrum values.
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Growth Marketing Guide: Advanced Tactics and Hacks

Growth Marketing Guide: Advanced Tactics and Hacks | DEVOPS | Scoop.it
The minimum viable growth plan

Build an amazing product that naturally encourages word-of-mouth.
Kickstart word-of-mouth with paid ad traffic. Even if it's temporarily unprofitable.
Now, spend the majority of your marketing resources optimizing your growth funnel: At every step, A/B Test conversion on the traffic you're paying for.
Once you have a profitable and streamlined funnel, it's time to scale. Aggressively test every potentially viable channel.

The right growth tactics for your company

With our growth plan in hand, we're missing one thing: What my experience running growth for 20+ companies suggests is the best tactic for your business model.
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La Documentation officielle de l'OMG — UML SysML

La Documentation officielle de l'OMG — UML SysML | DEVOPS | Scoop.it
File UML 2.1.2 Infrastructure 1.7Mo
File UML 2.1.2 Superstructure 5.8Mo
File OMG SysML Specification 3.3Mo
File SysML Tutorial - INCOSE - 2.2Mo
File Real Time and Embedded systems MARTE Specification 5.3Mo
File MARTE Tutorial 5.4 Mo
File MARTE Tutorial 713 Ko
File Liste Documentations Officielles UML
File UML Profile for SoC - 319 Ko
File BPMN Tutorial par IBM 583Ko
File BPMN Specification 3.3Mo
File UML profile for Business Modeling 674 Ko
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The Scrum Master as the Change Leader

The Scrum Master as the Change Leader | DEVOPS | Scoop.it
The 8 Preferred Stances of a Scrum Master

I prefer fulfilling the Scrum Master role being a(n)...

Impediment Remover solving blocking issues to the team’s progress, taking into account the self-organising capabilities of the Development Team.
Facilitator by setting the stage and providing clear boundaries in which the team can collaborate. Facilitating the Scrum events ensuring they'll achieve the desired outcome. Even more important: facilitate the necessary transparency by which true inspection and adaption can occur.
Coach coaching the individual with a focus on mindset and behaviour, the team in continuous improvement and the organisation in truly collaborating with the Scrum Team.
Teacher to ensure Scrum and other relevant methods are understood and enacted.
Servant Leader whose focus is on the needs of the team members and those they serve (the customer), with the goal of achieving results in line with the organisation’s values, principles, and business objectives.
Manager responsible for managing impediments, eliminating waste, managing the process, managing the team’s health, managing the boundaries of self-organisation, and managing the culture.
Change Agent to enable a culture in which Scrum Teams can flourish.
Mentor that transfers agile knowledge and experience to the team.
Mickael Ruau's insight:

The 3 Levels of a Scrum Master

The Scrum Guide offers a clear description of the services a Scrum Master provides to the Development Team, Product Owner and the organization. Some examples of these services are coaching the Development Team in self-organization and cross-functionality, helping the Product Owner finding techniques for effective Product Backlog management and supporting the organization in its Scrum adoption.

In the book "The Great Scrum Master" the author Zuzana Sochova uses the perspective of the 3 levels of a Scrum Master. I consider this perspective complementary to the description the Scrum Guide gives. In the InfoQ article "Q&A on The Great Scrum Master" Zuzana offers a great description of these 3 levels:

"The first is MyTeam. Scrum Masters where are almost like team members. They look at things from the development team perspective: Explaining different agile practices, facilitating Scrum meetings, help removing impediments, coaching the team, and making the team great.

The second level is Relationships. Where Scrum Masters are looking at team from much higher perspective, focusing their teaching, mentoring, facilitation, and coaching skills to improve relationships between team and other entities. Coaching the Product Owner to build a great vision, and facilitating conversation with other teams. Building a bigger eco-system which is self-organized.

Finally, the third level is the Entire System. Scrum Masters shall look at the company as a system, from ten thousand feet distance. Searching for organizational improvements. They shall become servant leaders, helping others to become leaders, grow communities, and heal relationships. Bring the agile values to the organizational level."

By fulfilling the Scrum Master role according to the 8 preferred stances, you'll provides services to the Development Team, Product Owner and organization. Also you will grow your role towards the three levels of a Scrum Master from "my team" to "relationships" towards the "Entire System".

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2 TUP

2 TUP signifie « 2 Track Unified Process »: c’est un processus de développement logiciel qui implémente le Processus Unifié (UP).

2 TUP est un processus qui apporte une réponse aux contraintes de changement continuel imposées aux systèmes d’information de l’entreprise.
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How Kano model helps to agile product backlog prioritization

How Kano model helps to agile product backlog prioritization | DEVOPS | Scoop.it
How Kano model helps to agile product backlog prioritization. ScrumDesk Consultancy Services, we know how to do productownership.
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One Metric to Rule Them All: Effectively Measure Your Teams Without Subjugating Them

One Metric to Rule Them All: Effectively Measure Your Teams Without Subjugating Them | DEVOPS | Scoop.it
Discover a framework for evaluating any metric, a Hall of Shame covering some of the worst most popular benchmarks, and one true guide to point you to the very best metrics of all. See some great examples of visualization that make metrics sing, and leave with several concrete measures you can begin tracking as soon as you get back to your desk.
Additional Resources

One Metric to Rule Them All – Effectively Measure your Teams without Subjugating Them
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L. Adkins and H. Dunsky on the State of Agile Coaching and the Competencies Coaches Need to Build

L. Adkins and H. Dunsky on the State of Agile Coaching and the Competencies Coaches Need to Build | DEVOPS | Scoop.it
Key Takeaways

There are a wide range of approaches which exist in agile coaching, while remaining aligned with common learning objectives
There is a marked difference between people who have put in the effort to build deep and wide coaching competency and those who have not done so, and organizations are becoming more discerning about who they engage in the coaching role
Key competencies for effective coaching are about the ability to reach people on a human-to-human level
There shouldn’t be a distinction between the scrum master and agile coach roles – scrum masters should be coaches
Even the most experienced and knowledgeable coaches can and do fall prey to human system dynamics and make mistakes
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Maximize Scrum with the Scrum Values: Focus (Part 1 of 5)

Maximize Scrum with the Scrum Values: Focus (Part 1 of 5) | DEVOPS | Scoop.it
The Scrum Values are easy to remember, but it can be difficult to understand what they mean, how to apply them, and how to recognize them in teams and individuals. These values are essential to maximize the benefits of Scrum.  In this post, we look at how focus is essential in order to get anything meaningful done.
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SAFe Principles

SAFe Principles | DEVOPS | Scoop.it
The SAFe® principles are very powerful but our coaching and consulting experiences have shown that, as currently presented, they are far less accessible and intuitive than the Agile Manifesto and its supporting 12 Agile Principles. In line with the release of 4.5 of SAFe®, which simplifies and enhances the SAFe® big picture, we have produced a set of cards that we believe do the same for the underlying SAFe® Principles. The cards present the nine principles in a self-contained, readily accessible fashion — allowing executives, leaders, and team members to readily understand the principles and quickly assess their relevance. Download the cards today to help your teams be SAFe®. This blog post introduces the SAFe Principle Cards produced by Ian Spence (SPCT) with help from Brian Kerr (SPC) and Brian Tucker (SPCT).
Mickael Ruau's insight:

WHAT’S ON THE CARDS?

The cards are simple, double-sided playing cards.

The front of the card presents the principle in a simple, short format that:

  • Expands on the title of the principle to illustrate the benefit of applying it
  • Adds a brief description of the principle as a statement with which you can easily agree or disagree
  • Adds a simple quote or aphorism to bring the principle to life.

Here are the cards for the first and last of the nine principles:

     

It is our belief that they are self-explanatory and presented in a way that makes it easy for the reader to say whether or not they agree with the sentiment expressed. Take another look at the cards. Given the information presented would you be prepared to sign up to them?

If you need a bit more information you could turn the card over to see a complementary, “what do good and bad look like” assessment card. Here are the backs of the two cards presented above.

     

These present what good looks like (alongside the happy face) and what bad looks like (alongside the sad face). These are deliberately cartoonish and elaborated for affect. No-one would really behave like the sad face on the decision-making card, would they?

The additional information on the back of the cards helps to bring the practices to life and illustrate their importance.

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The Agile Coach role at Spotify – Joakim Sundén

The Agile Coach role at Spotify – Joakim Sundén | DEVOPS | Scoop.it

“What does an agile coach do at Spotify?” This is a very common question when we host study tours in our office or when we speak at conferences. It is also a very good question because it makes us think about how we work and why we have chosen that way of working. I will try to answer all of these questions in a series of blog posts, starting with this one about the Agile Coach role and then publishing one blog post every day of this week, describing how I am actually spending my days as an agile coach at Spotify.

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