Developmental & Behavioral Challenges in Children
5.5K views | +0 today
Follow
Developmental & Behavioral Challenges in Children
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Dr. Pat McGuire
Scoop.it!

Woman Realizes That She’s Been Accidentally Abusing Her Husband This Whole Time... Wow.

Woman Realizes That She’s Been Accidentally Abusing Her Husband This Whole Time... Wow. | Developmental & Behavioral Challenges in Children | Scoop.it
Sometimes it takes one step back to know how to move forward.
Dr. Pat McGuire's insight:
This article was written by a woman, talking about how she had treated her husband. But it could also have been by a teacher on how she/he treated her students, or a parent on how she treated her child.

When and why did we come to believe that chastising, embarrassing, and punishing was the way to teach children (and others) how to do things the way we feel they should be?

What became of the Golden Rule " Do unto others as you would have them do unto you."

Let's look at how we interact with others and work to change it into supportive discussions.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pat McGuire
Scoop.it!

I've been in education for 20 years, and there's a disturbing trend afoot in kindergartens around the US

I've been in education for 20 years, and there's a disturbing trend afoot in kindergartens around the US | Developmental & Behavioral Challenges in Children | Scoop.it
Christopher Brown is a researcher, parent, and former kindergarten teacher, and in his view the state of affairs in kindergarten are downright troubling.
Dr. Pat McGuire's insight:
This author does an important job of pointing out that child development is being taken out of education. We are expecting kindergartners to be middle and high schoolers, sitting for instruction the entire day, with only a hope of a short recess at the end of the day. We expect them to learn by language, rather than exploration, which is the natural way for young children to learn. We are also expecting them to understand how kindergarten success will make or break their ability to be a successful adult. This type of emphasis is a significant factor in the problems with attention, anxiety, and even depression we are seeing in children at younger and younger ages. Studies have repeatedly shown that children do better with positive reinforcement of the process rather than pressure and negative remarks about current aptitude, be it academics are behavior. We have to understand that they do start the day hoping for success and being accepted/loved. If they feel that they have failed in these 2 areas by the end of the day, they become less enthusiastic for trying again the next day. Let's not continue this "children are little adults" mentality that puts the same expectations on kindergartners as we do on high schoolers. Let's allow child development lead the way to explorational learning.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pat McGuire
Scoop.it!

Can Mental Illness Be Prevented In The Womb?

Can Mental Illness Be Prevented In The Womb? | Developmental & Behavioral Challenges in Children | Scoop.it
Researchers are exploring changes in prenatal nutrition to lower risks for future mental disorders. The work is preliminary, but there is ample precedent for maternal diet affecting children's health.
Dr. Pat McGuire's insight:
We have long known that nutrition affects our well-being, health, and in children, development.  This latest study is the beginning of studies that look at how prenatal nutrition and supplementation can affect the fetus's brain development to the point of mental health later in life.

There have been previous work that has proven the effectiveness of folic acid and iron for the health of the fetus, and definitely iron for the health of the pregnant woman. Adding one more ingredient to prenatal vitamins should not be an area of concern when there does not appear to be danger for the mother or the fetus and expected improvement in mental health for future children and adults. 

I would see this as greatly preferable to prescribing medications for trying to turn around the lives of those suffering from mental illness, especially since many of the medications have side effects and don't provide skills and strategies for these suffering individuals.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dr. Pat McGuire from Developmental & Behavioral Challenges in Children
Scoop.it!

Mental Health In Schools: A Hidden Crisis Affecting Millions Of Students

Mental Health In Schools: A Hidden Crisis Affecting Millions Of Students | Developmental & Behavioral Challenges in Children | Scoop.it
An estimated 20 percent of children show signs or symptoms of a mental health problem. It's a destructive force in schools, but most educators don't have the training or resources to help.
more...
Dr. Pat McGuire's curator insight, September 2, 2016 1:07 PM
The mental health crisis of our children is extremely disturbing. As this article points out roughly one child in five has a mental health disorder. What they didn't mention is at least that many are at the mental health problem level, which are amenable to interventions and accommodations by the adults around them. This of course, means that parents, teachers and other adults need the knowledge to recognize the precursors to the disorder level and the understanding of how they can support the child. Having worked with teachers, school counselors,  and social workers, I know that with this training, they feel more confident that they can be part of the solution.
Scooped by Dr. Pat McGuire
Scoop.it!

Schools that accept ‘no excuses’ from students are not helping them

Schools that accept ‘no excuses’ from students are not helping them | Developmental & Behavioral Challenges in Children | Scoop.it
I should know; I taught in one.
Dr. Pat McGuire's insight:
The author of this article points out a problem that is present all too often in our society and based on the belief that children are "to be seen but not heard" and to "do it because I said so". These phrases were standard for hundreds of years based on the belief that children were like animals with no ability to process information or understand the logic of adult thinking. They were considered lesser beings, and at times property.

We understand so much more about brain development in children and need to look at the research that points to the need to be supportive in helping our children develop and learn. Providing more positive interactions than negative will increase a willingness to learn and take chances.

We need to promote schools that allow for conversation, questioning and even heated discussion (working to limit emotional tirades that limit the frontal lobe) if we really want future adults who can participate fully in our society.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pat McGuire
Scoop.it!

Using Fingers to Count in Math Class Is Not 'Babyish'

Using Fingers to Count in Math Class Is Not 'Babyish' | Developmental & Behavioral Challenges in Children | Scoop.it
Evidence from brain science suggests that far from being “babyish,” the technique is essential for mathematical achievement.
Dr. Pat McGuire's insight:
Are we stopping children from using their best tools to learn?  That is essentially what we are doing with many of the beliefs, most without evidence to their dogma. This article is an excellent discussion of how schools have dismissed using fingers to learn. I know I had to defend my my oldest daughter's use of her fingers for reading in second grade. She still benefited from the finger to assist in tracking the words across the page. She now reads constantly, but would she if she had not been allowed to use her tools to help her develop tracking skills in those early years?

Let's not dismiss developmental tools as part of a child's learning process.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pat McGuire
Scoop.it!

Want Your Children to Be Successful? Keep Them Away From These As Long As Possible

Want Your Children to Be Successful? Keep Them Away From These As Long As Possible | Developmental & Behavioral Challenges in Children | Scoop.it
They're everywhere nowadays. But that doesn't mean your child has to have one.
Dr. Pat McGuire's insight:
This article talks about the problems with children getting involved with sexting, porn  and in general smartphone addiction. But I feel that these are not the only concerns.

We are seeing a significant number of children suffering from trauma. One type of trauma is being exposed to horrific crime with no ability to put words to it or process it in terms of their reality. An example would be all the children and adults who were no where near the Towers in NYC on 9/11 (including children I cared for in Iowa) who suffered elements of PTSD.

We don't need our children to have free access 24/7 to games, news, etc. They need time to be their age and development. They  need to see how their world is, not someone elses.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pat McGuire
Scoop.it!

An Early Bedtime for Kids May Fight Weight Gain

An Early Bedtime for Kids May Fight Weight Gain | Developmental & Behavioral Challenges in Children | Scoop.it
Preschool children who are in bed by 8 p.m. are far less likely to be obese during adolescence than children who stay up late.
Dr. Pat McGuire's insight:
This article focuses on the role of adequate sleep on obesity in children, which is important. But adequate sleep time affects many parts of child development and later life issues. Think about irritability, cognitive, and general health issues which come from inadequate sleep. Helping parents learn how to prioritize events in their and their children's lives so that children can have adequate sleep. Simplifying their day by having fewer extra-curricular activities (gymnastics, softball, etc.) leading to later dinners and bedtimes can lead to a more stable child.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pat McGuire
Scoop.it!

How happy you are as a parent is directly tied to one very surprising thing

How happy you are as a parent is directly tied to one very surprising thing | Developmental & Behavioral Challenges in Children | Scoop.it
America has the largest happiness shortfall between parents and non-parents. But why? Turns out, government is the key.
Dr. Pat McGuire's insight:
Why is the US so family-unfriendly?  The negative impact our policies have on parent happiness likely impacts the social and emotional health of our children. In this election year (and I don't just mean presidential) we need to ask those running how they can help close the happiness gap, as discussed in this article.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pat McGuire
Scoop.it!

More With Developmental Disabilities Medicated, Study Finds

Young people with autism and intellectual disability account for a burgeoning number of those prescribed antipsychotics, new research suggests.
Dr. Pat McGuire's insight:
There has been a major swing to prescribing medication rather than acknowledging the need to look at their needs environmentally and emotionally. We force them to participate in large classrooms, expect them to try regular education materials even though the focus may be too abstract in nature, and punished when they get overwhelmed, including having them dragged off by the police.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pat McGuire
Scoop.it!

He stumbled on a hidden epidemic of brain damage. The culprit? Alcohol

He stumbled on a hidden epidemic of brain damage. The culprit? Alcohol | Developmental & Behavioral Challenges in Children | Scoop.it
Psychiatrists have identified a hidden epidemic of brain damage, fetal alcohol spectrum disorder; many patients are misdiagnosed as mentally ill.
Dr. Pat McGuire's insight:
I have had to tell a number of parents over my 3 + decades in practice that their child had Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder. Some were devastated and some appeared numb. But what was hardest was trying to get the schools to understand the significant cognitive impairment that these children experienced. 

Our schools have been unprepared to handle the unique differences of children in the autism spectrum with many still being served as behaviorally disordered.  How are they supposed to  serve our FASD children, when again, the reason behind the challenges is hidden within their brains, not a choice to misbehave?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pat McGuire
Scoop.it!

Texas School Triples Recess Time And Sees Immediate Positive Results In Kids

Texas School Triples Recess Time And Sees Immediate Positive Results In Kids | Developmental & Behavioral Challenges in Children | Scoop.it
A Texas school started giving kindergarten and first-grade students more recess time, and parents and teachers love the results.
Dr. Pat McGuire's insight:
While schools have felt that taking time away from direct instruction will cause a growing gap in academics, the reality is that breaks and movement allow for processing of information. And as the article pointed out, it also allows more time for social interaction and is more effective in developing skills than sitting in a classroom where they are supposed to sit still, not talk to others, and pay attention.
more...
Michele Moffat's curator insight, June 11, 2016 4:14 PM
Food for thought!
Scooped by Dr. Pat McGuire
Scoop.it!

We’re asking the wrong questions about early childhood education - The Hechinger Report

We’re asking the wrong questions about early childhood education - The Hechinger Report | Developmental & Behavioral Challenges in Children | Scoop.it
“Pre-K for all” sounds great. America’s public schools are the engine of equal opportunity and giving kids the chance to get an early start by expanding public pre-K seems like a sensible idea that anyone who cares about kids would support. Indeed, states across the country are getting on board. Forty-five now have public pre-K …
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pat McGuire
Scoop.it!

Why Understanding Student Trauma is More Important Than Teaching ‘Grit’

Why Understanding Student Trauma is More Important Than Teaching ‘Grit’ | Developmental & Behavioral Challenges in Children | Scoop.it
“We are asking students to change a belief system without changing the situation around them.”
Dr. Pat McGuire's insight:
This important information is needed to be truly understanded by teachers and others who work with at-risk students, as well as child care providers.  Otherwise they are simply pigeon holed and treated inappropriately.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pat McGuire
Scoop.it!

Childhood bullying linked to long-term use of mental health services

Childhood bullying linked to long-term use of mental health services | Developmental & Behavioral Challenges in Children | Scoop.it
New research shows that childhood bullying has a strong link to mental health service use throughout a person's life, putting additional strain on an "already overstretched" UK healthcare system.
Dr. Pat McGuire's insight:
The role of bullying in childhood and the long-term mental health problems for adults is important to realize.  This is consistent with the ACE study looking at childhood experiences in their home and adult physical and mental health problems.

Bullying needs to be acknowledged and not just talked about. I have seen many students within the last 24 months who are being bullied in school but are not believed by the school staff. They are told that it is a right of passage, kids will be kids, and they must have brought it upon themselves.

Forget the phrase "Sticks and stones may break our bones, but words will never hurt us." Words do hurt. And they do leave lifelong scars and alterations in our physical and mental health.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pat McGuire
Scoop.it!

Student’s leg to be amputated after altercation with teacher, lawyer says

Student’s leg to be amputated after altercation with teacher, lawyer says | Developmental & Behavioral Challenges in Children | Scoop.it
A 13-year-old boy who said he was slammed to the floor by a teachers at the Edgewood Student Services Center on September 12, 2016, is having his leg amputated as a result of the alleged incident, said Renee Tucker, an attorney representing him and his mother. She said the school didn’t render aid to the boy after the incident.
Dr. Pat McGuire's insight:
While I am well aware that the type of behavior that occurred to this student is not the norm, there are many teachers, aides, and other school personnel who don't have the temperament profile and/or training to deal with perceived noncompliance which wouldn't lead to student injury.

There needs to be more emphasis on providing not just training but  also monitoring and follow up training and support for school personnel who are involved in working with challenging students. They need to deeply understand the temperament, any cognitive or neurodevelopmental issues the student has, and the effect of their health, family, and community on their functioning.

Administrators would also benefit through understanding the same areas of their personnel and themselves and how it colors their interactions with others. This type of information along with integrating PBIS rather than historical methods of student control will lead to a much greater decrease in this type of limbic response to perceived noncompliance.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pat McGuire
Scoop.it!

Mental Health In Schools: A Hidden Crisis Affecting Millions Of Students

Mental Health In Schools: A Hidden Crisis Affecting Millions Of Students | Developmental & Behavioral Challenges in Children | Scoop.it
An estimated 20 percent of children show signs or symptoms of a mental health problem. It's a destructive force in schools, but most educators don't have the training or resources to help.
Dr. Pat McGuire's insight:
The mental health crisis of our children is extremely disturbing. As this article points out roughly one child in five has a mental health disorder. What they didn't mention is at least that many are at the mental health problem level, which are amenable to interventions and accommodations by the adults around them. This of course, means that parents, teachers and other adults need the knowledge to recognize the precursors to the disorder level and the understanding of how they can support the child. Having worked with teachers, school counselors,  and social workers, I know that with this training, they feel more confident that they can be part of the solution.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pat McGuire
Scoop.it!

How one small change made a big difference to keep kids in school

How one small change made a big difference to keep kids in school | Developmental & Behavioral Challenges in Children | Scoop.it
A new program sponsored by Whirlpool found that putting washing machines in schools improved attendance rates and participation.
Dr. Pat McGuire's insight:
Do you remember middle school? I remember it and I also remember what my own kids worried about, much of it the same. It was how to fit in, how to look acceptable, how not to stand out as different.

For low-income students, as this article points out, this frequently leads to absenteeism. and disengagement in the classroom. They are too worried about their life and their image to others to also focus on the lesson. And those of us, who don't live their lives, don't get it. Not really.

This program with Whirlpool is a simple, yet profound start into bringing a sense of self worth to these adolescents. One less thing that they have to be uncomfortable about.

The numbers speak for themselves. Let's support companies like Whirlpool who help children focus on improving themselves, not hiding from potential embarrassment and self-loathing.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pat McGuire
Scoop.it!

There Is Nothing Wrong With Those Kids: How Implicit Bias Affects Black And Brown Students

There Is Nothing Wrong With Those Kids: How Implicit Bias Affects Black And Brown Students | Developmental & Behavioral Challenges in Children | Scoop.it
In 1970, I was kicked out of a teacher education program in California. More accurately, the letter I received said, "You may continue to take [i.e
Dr. Pat McGuire's insight:
This author had several good points that need to be shared. First, know about the family your student comes from. If he or she is the eldest and it is a one parent household, you may be dealing with a child in the position of responsibility and leadership in their family. By not approaching them from that viewpoint, they feel disrespected and therefore will respond with disrespect.

The second important point is you need to know that this student may be responding from their amygdala, or the fight or flight center of their brain, so that they are always on the defensive. Approaching them in an authoritative manner will increase that response. They will respond much more positively through a collaborative manner which allows them to tell their side and have it considered in the conversation. Doing so will lower the fight or flight response and open up channels in their frontal and prefrontal lobes for communication and processing.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pat McGuire
Scoop.it!

My Wife And I Never Said 'No' To Our Kids, And This Is What Happened

My Wife And I Never Said 'No' To Our Kids, And This Is What Happened | Developmental & Behavioral Challenges in Children | Scoop.it
What are the children of 'Yes Parenting' like? originall
Dr. Pat McGuire's insight:
I always said that I raised my children with respect which is pretty much what this man and his late wife did. Now I admit to saying no, but I would explain why in order to show that it wasn't random, knee jerk reactions. Despite what many parents tell me, children do need to understand the "whys" of our responses if it doesn't make sense. This, in my  mind, is part of the attachment process, since they have to trust us, even if we don't agree. My children also are doing well and all seeing themselves as lifelong learners.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pat McGuire
Scoop.it!

One Key to Reducing School Suspension: A Little Respect

One Key to Reducing School Suspension: A Little Respect | Developmental & Behavioral Challenges in Children | Scoop.it
A Stanford University study finds that a one-time intervention to help teachers and students empathize with one another halved the number of suspensions at five California middle schools, and helped build bonds between disengaged students and their schools.
Dr. Pat McGuire's insight:
Have you ever had another adult treat you dismissively? How did it make you feel? Did you feel angry, resentful? Do you ever feel like seeking some sort of revenge? If this occurs frequently, does it begin to affect how you see yourself and your ability?

As an adult, hopefully you have enough past positive experiences to counterbalance these experiences. And yet, the words and actions of others can still negatively affect you. Students, however, have less positive experiences to fall back on and may have more negative experiences from home or their community, which they bring to the classroom, due to less trust of the adults they encounter.

This article is just one instance of research pointing to the effect of teacher interactions with students and long term outcomes. It is not saying that teachers are bad guys. Rather, it reinforces the basic needs of all, for love, acceptance and respect. The need is in providing teachers with the skills to pick up on this and the whys of behavior in order to create foundations of self-empowerment. As I work with teachers I have found that through cognitively processing response versus reaction classroom management does improve.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pat McGuire
Scoop.it!

Getting Curious (Not Furious) With Students

Getting Curious (Not Furious) With Students | Developmental & Behavioral Challenges in Children | Scoop.it
When teachers get curious instead of furious, they don't take the student's behavior personally, and they don't act on anger. They respond to student behaviors rather than react to them.
Dr. Pat McGuire's insight:
When talking about developing caring teaching relationships with students, the idea of "Getting Curious - Not Furious" is essential. It is hard, however, since we are primitively wired to fight back (limbic fight or flight). Providing teachers with the knowledge which can allow faster movement from limbic to logic is essential. I have seen this transformation with many educators that I have worked with as well as many parents.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pat McGuire
Scoop.it!

Mouse study suggests autism is not just a disease of the brain

Mouse study suggests autism is not just a disease of the brain | Developmental & Behavioral Challenges in Children | Scoop.it
Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are characterized by impaired social interactions and repetitive behaviors, often accompanied by abnormal reactions to sensory stimuli. ASD is generally thought to be caused by deficits i
Dr. Pat McGuire's insight:
If true it could explain why so many individuals with ASD experience problems with hugs, touch,  and even texture.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pat McGuire
Scoop.it!

Frustrated, talented teachers leave Florida classrooms in droves

Frustrated, talented teachers leave Florida classrooms in droves | Developmental & Behavioral Challenges in Children | Scoop.it
Florida's frustrated teachers leave classrooms in droves. It costs money to replace them. Students lose talented instructors. But legislators and Gov. Rick Scott don't seem to care
Dr. Pat McGuire's insight:
Teachers are not the only ones leaving. As part of the medical industry, I have been frustrated for now decades with the roles of the insurance industry and  the government in regulating what we do. Again, like the educators, we have not been part of the discussion, just the pawns that have to live with their decisions. The outcome will be the best and brightest of  where the respect and income are. We need to re-evaluate the purpose of reforms and focus on the development of improved relationships between teacher and student as well as doctor and patient. Paperwork and red tape don't do this. Tests and quotas don't do this.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pat McGuire
Scoop.it!

High School Football Players Suffer More Symptoms After Concussion: Study

High School Football Players Suffer More Symptoms After Concussion: Study | Developmental & Behavioral Challenges in Children | Scoop.it
Meanwhile, youth league players most likely to return to field less than 24 hours after head injury
more...
No comment yet.