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Measuring people time with Meteor

Measuring people time with Meteor | Development on Various Platforms | Scoop.it

Kat had a great idea for measuring time people spent in meetings. A cumulative counter that measures time faster the more people that are in them.

The result was Hyperclock, built in meteor, theoretically supporting websockets -but it's hosted (free) on heroku ;-)

I hadn't developed a project in meteor before so I learnt some stuff about it along the way:

*  Where does everything go?

*  Autoupdating

*  Mongo

*  Drawing

*  Save safely

*  Have a go! (maybe)


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Getting Started with a Javascript Framework - MeteorJS

Getting Started with a Javascript Framework - MeteorJS | Development on Various Platforms | Scoop.it

I am writing about Meteor to help promote the framework and the open source community around the Meteor project.

Another quick note before kicking off these writings is to also clarify that these writings will not teach you how to write HTML, CSS or Javascript. The examples I plan on providing are to be considered as proofs of concept and in most cases - not taken for production code. If you find use or purpose for snippets found here - please feel free to take ahold of them and bend them to your will!

With those bits out of the way lets get started.

The first step to getting started with Meteor is to understand why we would even want to use Meteor, or frankly anything, as a Javascript framework. I have the wonderful opportunity to work and collaborate with many awesome developers - and all of us at one time have had issue’s with scaling web applications effectively due to poor, or sometimes just no, Javascript code structure.


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Rolling your own Meteor js environment

Rolling your own Meteor js environment | Development on Various Platforms | Scoop.it

Use Meteor's hosted solution

 

You can use “meteor deploy myapp.meteor.com” in your project root directory to spin up your app in a development environment that’s maintained by the awesome folks at Meteor. It’s a simple process. The problem is that it is explicitly stated that this is not for Production apps and you don’t get multiple hosts. So pretty quickly, you’ll need to find a new solution once you go live.

Note: Meteor’s hosting platform Galaxy is coming to beta in the coming months. It’ll likely stay in beta for a while with a disclaimer that it’s not for Production apps. When it’s ready, it’s going to be glorious, but until then, you’ll have to find an alternative solution.

 

Use a node.js platform hosted solution

 

Use “demeteorizer” to bundle up your application as a standalone node app and deploy it to one of the several Node hosting platforms like Heroku, Nodejitsu, or Modulus. This will certainly work if you only need one server (dyno, servo, or whatever each person calls it). But once you need to scale beyond that, you’ll bump up against the fact that none of them offer sticky sessions in a way that your Meteor app needs.

Don’t let their marketing fool you. Some claim to offer sticky sessions. They are lying and when you run into problems and in the face of proof (an ip log showing the same visitor hitting multiple servers), they’ll shrug their shoulders and say, “we don’t know Meteor”.

 

Roll your own solution on the cloud platform of your choice

 

If none of this sounds attractive to you, then you do have another option. It’s the place we ended up at: we just rolled our own stack. And it was easier than you might think.


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Client Sync for the REST of Us

Client Sync for the REST of Us | Development on Various Platforms | Scoop.it

It is no surprise that streaming technologies such as meteor have taken the spotlight over the last year. They present a compelling real-time way of keeping the client in sync with the server. One interesting result of thinking in real-time is that things like conflicts become top of mind: what is supposed to happen when two separate users modify the same data at the same time?

When dealing with traditional websites and basic REST API's, however, less thought is given to these concurrency scenarios. Real-time aside, in an age where client-heavy applications are becoming commonplace, this behavior can be problematic. In this post, I explore this inadequacy and also explore a possible solution.


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Overview of Derby.js and Meteor.js

With a focus on their philosophy (vs practical usage tips)...

Agenda
* Derby.js/Meteor.js - Common Concepts
* A little more about Derby.js
* A short Derby.js demo (Oooooo)
* A little more about Meteor.js
* A short Meteor.js demo (Ahhhhh)
* Discussion & Beers (Yummm)


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Things you need to know when scaling Meteor JS

Things you need to know when scaling Meteor JS | Development on Various Platforms | Scoop.it

It’s a jungle out there, it is. And chances are that (in your manic hacking frenzy) you’ve committed some transgressions that will come to bite you when you finally float your app onto the stormy seas of Production.

How did we chance upon this knowledge? Well, first and foremost, through blood, sweat and tears from our own production resource planning app crashing repeatedly during its first week. Through this chaos we formed some assumptions about what was going on and remedied the situation with some hot-fixes.

So before we get started, let’s make a distinction between anonymous, unauthenticated users and logged in users. Their experiences are most likely completely different - and (importantly) there are some considerations that go along with this.

So some pages / content don’t need to be reactive. We’ve discussed making queries static in a previous post. But you can do this for templates too using #constant regions.


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A Meteor Node.js App to Heroku in 5 Minutes

A Meteor Node.js App to Heroku in 5 Minutes | Development on Various Platforms | Scoop.it

Meteor is an amazing framework to rapidly build fully interactive web applications based on node.js and MongoDB.

I had a look at the video on the home page and I was quite impressed. I wanted to check it out myself on the web so I installed the framework


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Meteor.js with Matt Debergalis

Open-source and written entierly in JavaScript, Meteor hopes to change the way web apps are written.

Through features like live page updating and hot code pushing, they want to make web development on the client and in the cloud at the same time a possibility. In this talk at HTML5 Dev Conf 3, Matt Debergalis talks about how Meteor came to be, and breaks down some of the inner workings of their product's simultaneous development abilites.


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Radically faster web development -- Meteor after one year

Meteor is a new development platform that makes it dramatically faster to write rich web applications in pure JavaScript. In this talk from HTML5DevConf, Matt DeBergails, founder of Meteor asks, "how do we build this new style of application that's just fundamentally different than the tooling, and the practices that we've learned over the last ten years building for a server-centric environment?"

Matt will address some of the challenges associated with building client-side apps, and how Meteor's packages work together to create an exceptional development experience.


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Meteor.js Fundamentals for Single Page Applications

Meteor.js Fundamentals for Single Page Applications | Development on Various Platforms | Scoop.it

This course was a really fun course to put together, because Meteor is just an awesome platform.  After using Meteor, I actually am starting to like JavaScript.  I really like the idea of being able to build an entire application in a single language and to be able to use a single platform that takes care of all the plumbing for me.

The technology is still in its infancy, but I think it has huge potential.  Not very often I get this excited about a technology.

So, if you are interested in Meteor and want to see how you can create single page applications entirely in JavaScript with relatively little code, compared to other solutions, check out this course


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Meteor hacks and tricks

Meteor hacks and tricks | Development on Various Platforms | Scoop.it

Viable collection of blog posts about Meteor.js

Code Samples, Extensions to the core and Best Practices.


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Meteor for Front-End Engineers

Meteor for Front-End Engineers | Development on Various Platforms | Scoop.it

As part of my daily web browsing routine, I follow a number of front-end blogs. I'm always amazed at how far good front-end engineers can push JavaScript and CSS, and how well they are able to master the intricacies of web browsers.

Yet I also can't help but notice that a lot of front-end developers seem to limit themselves to, well, the front-end.

On one hand this makes sense. With new JavaScript frameworks and browser versions popping up every day, client-side development already offers more than enough to keep you occupied for a lifetime.

Yet the fact remains that it's often hard to build functional web apps without involving a back-end environment at some point, if only to communicate with a database.

Up to now, adding a back-end to your app meant learning a back-end language such as Ruby, Python, or PHP. And that new environment came with its own set of patterns and quirks that had to be learnt from scratch.

But things are changing. Node.js introduced JavaScript on the server, and for the first time developers could code their whole app in a single language.

Meanwhile, backend-as-a-service offerings like Parse and Firebase now make it possible to add persistent data to an app with little more than a few lines of JavaScript.

But to day I'd like to talk about yet a third approach: Meteor, an up-and-coming JavaScript framework that bridges the gap between client and server.


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Our take on Derby vs. Meteor - Derby blog

Our teams share a similar vision for a world where all applications are realtime and collaborative by default. We as well as a number of other other developers all had a revelation about a year and a half ago—the way that web apps are currently built makes it painfully difficult to create the best user experience, where data dynamically update everywhere.

Thanks to the awesome re-invention of JavaScript performance starting with V8 and the ability to easily create JavaScript servers with Node.js, lots of developers are excited about the notion of using JavaScript for both server and client development. But despite finally using the same language, few Node.js applications to date deliver on the amazing ability to share code. Even with a common language, there are still a lot of issues including very different latency and connection stability, separate ways of dealing with URLs on the server and in the browser, the existence of a DOM in the browser and not on the server, and direct access to a filesystem only on the server.

* GPL vs. MIT
* Meteor packages vs. npm
* Compatibility with other libraries
* MongoDB API vs. Racer methods
* Server rendering and shared routes
* Model-view data bindings
* DOM event handlers
* Fibers
* Wrapping it up


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9 ways that Meteor JS raises expectations

9 ways that Meteor JS raises expectations | Development on Various Platforms | Scoop.it

Meteor is a relatively new JavaScript web framework that has taken big efforts to re-imagine how developers build applications. It has a lot of fantastic features that you normally hear about—e.g., sharing code between the client & server, reactive templates, data synchronization—but it has also drastically changed my expectations in regards to more common tasks while building web applications. Here are 9 scenarios that are normally a hassle with any framework, but are much easier with Meteor.


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Improving the Performance of your Meteor JS projects

Improving the Performance of your Meteor JS projects | Development on Various Platforms | Scoop.it

So you found Meteor, learned it in a day and started your next million dollar idea ... only to find your new masterpiece is slow as all get out. What happened? Well, the reactive nature of the framework needs to be used wisely.

When I first started exploring Meteor JS with the perspective of a PHP developer, I immediately applied my traditional thinking to Meteor's session: that they are a place to store data over time. Well kind of...

When you using your Collections, think about how that data is going to be used. If you can determine that you never need to update the DOM or HTML if the document(s) change, then you can tell Meteor not to make the query reactive. Then if data in the return documents changes, it won't cause your template to rebuild.

 

 


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Using Meteor as frontend library!

Using Meteor as frontend library! | Development on Various Platforms | Scoop.it

Meteor is awesome, i loved it immediately as i saw the video. The way you can build one page apps is absolutely intuitive. I struggled with Ember.js, Backbone.js and AngularJS (which clutter the HTML too much), but Meteor really got it, in my opinion.

The problem with Meteor is that it forces you to use the full-stack. Natively there is currently no easy way to separate the frontend from the server in Meteor.

As i’m using Meteor to build the awesome TunedIn WebApp and we have already an existing API, i was in the need to split Meteor. Out of any need comes a solution so i wrote a grunt script which takes care of this automatically.


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SOARING WITH METEOR.JS

SOARING WITH METEOR.JS | Development on Various Platforms | Scoop.it

Out of the box, Meteor utilizes MongoDB for databases, Node.js for the server, Handlebars.js for templating, the Meteor class for awesomeness, and vanilla JavaScript for everything else. These tools make Meteor unique because it enables reactivity with two way databinding, synchronization with hot-code-pushes, responsiveness with latency compensation, and functions with vanilla JavaScript from end-to-end.

There may be two audiences reading this, so I’ll describe each of my favorite Meteor.js features with this in mind.

* TWO WAY DATA-BINDING IN METEOR.JS

* HOT CODE PUSHES

* LATENCY COMPENSATION


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Best Learning Resources for Meteor.js

Best Learning Resources for Meteor.js | Development on Various Platforms | Scoop.it

Meteor.js is an open-source platform built on node.js for building web apps quite rapidly. It is designed to allow programmers to create applications in a modern fashion, using up-to-date paradigms. If you’re interested to know what features will be available when, have a look at the Meteor Roadmap.

In the meantime, if you want to learn more about developing applications using JavaScript and Meteor, here’s a short compilations of things I found helpful to jumpstart.

Once you know JavaScript basics you can dive into Meteor. Since the aim of Meteor.js is to radically simplify app development, you will very quickly be able to see good results.


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Jan Hesse's curator insight, May 7, 2014 3:30 PM

An extensive curated List of learning material and HowTos