Human and Physical Geography
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The genius of the London Tube Map | Michael Bierut

Published on Mar 15, 2018
"Small Thing Big Idea," an original TED series, celebrates the lasting genius of everyday objects so perfectly designed that they changed the world around them.


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A great example for our map competition.
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Climate Change's Best Hope I NOVA

Published on Apr 4, 2018
The one thing Katherine Hayhoe wishes we did about climate change.


Via Andrew van Zyl
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Use this when your students talk about the 'small country' defense against needing to change how we interact with our environment.
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Theewaterskloof Dam's 3 year collapse in 60 seconds I News24

Published on Mar 23, 2018
Aerial footage of the Theewaterskloof Dam captures the different stages of the three year drought from November 2016 until March 2018.


Via Andrew van Zyl
Catherine Pearce's insight:
A dramatic representation of the impact of drought periods on water resources and infrastructure. It also illustrates a talking point for the idea of interconnection between people and environment.
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Cape Town farmers laid off amid water crisis | Al Jazeera

Published on Mar 20, 2018
Cape Town in South Africa is running out of water, and farmers in rural areas surrounding the city are suffering. About 30,000 seasonal farm workers have been laid off, with the threat of more layoffs if it does not rain soon. The crisis is so severe that the city may soon have to shut off access to tap water.


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The Guardian view on geography: it’s the must-have A-level | Editorial | Opinion | The Guardian

The Guardian view on geography: it’s the must-have A-level | Editorial | Opinion | The Guardian | Human and Physical Geography | Scoop.it
Editorial: It used to be a Cinderella subject. Now, in a world that increasingly values people who can work across the physical and social sciences, geography’s all the rage

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Population Density

This talks about what population density is and why people live where they do.-- Created using PowToon -- Free sign up at http://www.powtoon.com/ . Make your...

Via Dean Haakenson
Catherine Pearce's insight:

A nice straight forward presentation

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Jeremy Hansen's curator insight, October 21, 2014 10:46 AM

Excellent short video defining and explaining population density. 

Bradley Hunkins's curator insight, October 28, 2014 2:55 PM

Why do people live in the locations they do and how can we impact our enviroment

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America is rapidly aging in a country built for the young

America is rapidly aging in a country built for the young | Human and Physical Geography | Scoop.it

"Although we seldom think about them this way, most American communities as they exist today were built for the spry and mobile. We've constructed millions of multi-story, single-family homes where the master bedroom is on the second floor, where the lawn outside requires weekly upkeep, where the mailbox is a stroll away. We've designed neighborhoods where everyday errands require a driver's license. We've planned whole cities where, if you don't have a car, it's not particularly easy to walk anywhere — especially not if you move gingerly.

This reality has been a fine one for a younger country. Those multi-story, single-family homes with broad lawns were great for Baby Boomers when they had young families. And car-dependent suburbs have been fine for residents with the means and mobility to drive everywhere. But as the Baby Boomers whose preferences drove a lot of these trends continue to age, it's becoming increasingly clear that the housing and communities we've built won't work very well for the old."


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Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, October 18, 2014 6:48 PM

This is also an issue in Australia where the overwhelming majority of people live in single story dwellings and are very car reliant.

Joshua Mason's curator insight, January 28, 2015 8:59 PM

I can definitely see this as a real problem. Both my Uncle and my Great Uncle moved their condos from ones that had numerous steps to climb to the second floor to more elder-friendly options. My Great Uncle even went a step further to move him and his wife to a senior living community, where there food, entertainment, etc. is all provided within an enclosed neighbourhood with other people of their age group. More of these communities that act like oversized retirement homes could be the answer. They give the illusion of suburban living, something the baby boomers liked, while providing the accessibility they need.

Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, April 8, 2015 12:27 PM

APHG- HW Option 1

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Geography Soup

"A great resource full of great links to accompany the Geography Soup channel on Vimeo."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 3, 2014 7:19 PM

Geography Soup is a Vimeo channel designed to include interesting videos that are laden with geographic content in them.  This powerpoint slideshow has resources designed to help you get the most flavor and substance out of these (and any other) video resources.  This is especially great for K-12 students, physical and regional geography.


Tags: K12, video.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 1, 2014 11:22 PM

Course resource

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Nature article - An holistic approach to beach erosion vulnerability assessment

Nature article - An holistic approach to beach erosion vulnerability assessment | Human and Physical Geography | Scoop.it
Erosion is a major threat for coasts worldwide, beaches in particular, which constitute one of the most valuable coastal landforms. Vulnerability assessments related to beach erosion may contribute to planning measures to counteract erosion by identifying, quantifying and ranking vulnerability. Herein, we present a new index, the Beach Vulnerability Index (BVI), which combines simplicity in calculations, easily obtainable data and low processing capacity. This approach provides results not only for different beaches, but also for different sectors of the same beach and enables the identification of the relative significance of the processes involved. It functions through the numerical approximation of indicators that correspond to the mechanisms related to the processes that control beach evolution, such as sediment availability, wave climate, beach morhodynamics and sea level change. The BVI is also intended to be used as a managerial tool for beach sustainability, including resilience to climate change impact on beach erosion.

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Map - Routes to a better life - migration to Europe from Africa and the Middle East

Map - Routes to a better life - migration to Europe from Africa and the Middle East | Human and Physical Geography | Scoop.it

The popularity of illegal migration routes into Europe changes over time. In recent years a crackdown on the Canary Island route has seen many people travel through Libya, where a lack of security has helped.


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Mathijs Booden's curator insight, August 15, 2014 6:15 AM

The word "helped' here is used in a rather abstract sense.

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Scoring for Peace Trailer - YouTube

Watch the entire film: http://youtu.be/mUkeurtXQL0 Divided by years of war and conflict, young men across four African countries are brought together by a co...
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Charcoal: Environmental Crisis or Sustainable Development Opportunity?

This video is based on a Policy Note on the charcoal sector, that was published jointly by the World Bank and the Government of Tanzania in August 2009. The ...
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Social landlord's new 'bedroom tax beating' development welcomed » Housing » 24dash.com

Social landlord's new 'bedroom tax beating' development welcomed » Housing » 24dash.com | Human and Physical Geography | Scoop.it
A social landlord's new housing development which was designed to "beat the bedroom tax" has been welcomed by Wirral Borough Council.
Tenants like the Sant family have now moved into smaller and more affordable one or two-bedroom properties in Birke...

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What impact is Cape Town's water crisis having on the poor? | Al Jazeera

23 March 2018
About 30,000 seasonal farm workers have lost their jobs because of the drought, and more layoffs are likely if rain doesn’t come soon. A city-run campaign - known as “Day Zero” - that counted the days until the taps would be turned off had such a negative impact on tourism that officials were force to abandon it. It did, though, have a positive impact on conservation efforts.

But many say that only the wealthy are truly able to conserve or find a solution without government help, which can have a negative impact on those most in need.


Via Andrew van Zyl
Catherine Pearce's insight:
Fair and equal access to resources is a challenge. One of our declared human rights is access to clean, reliable water. South Africa illustrates the challenge of achieving this within communities.
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How Was Red Rock Canyon Formed? I Smithsonian

Published on Mar 23, 2018
Millions of years ago, Las Vegas Valley laid at the bottom of an ancient sea. Movement of the earth's tectonic plates caused the water to drain and pushed up the land forming a towering structure known as Red Rock Canyon.


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Catherine Pearce's insight:
This would have been excellent for my Year 8's about 3 weeks ago!
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National Geographic Reckons With Its Past: 'For Decades, Our Coverage Was Racist'

National Geographic Reckons With Its Past: 'For Decades, Our Coverage Was Racist' | Human and Physical Geography | Scoop.it

"Before it could publish an issue on race, the magazine first had to look at its own history. 'Some of what you find in our archives leaves you speechless,' writes editor Susan Goldberg.  The 1916 caption of the picture of these aboriginal Australians described them as 'savages who rank lowest in intelligence of all human beings.'"


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 16, 4:45 PM

This is both incredibly obvious, and remarkably shocking.  I don't think that any academic geographic should be surprised that for generations, National Geographic's goals to describe the world's people and it mission to sell magazines made its coverage a product of the cultural norms of the times, the magazine producers and subscribers.  Still, this open honesty coming from National Geographic about National Geographic's past is a breath of fresh air that is quite encouraging, even if some still think that National Geographic's issue and cover miss the mark.

 

Questions to Ponder: Are there some voyeuristic tendencies we might exhibit as well learn about, or discuss other cultures?  How do we highlight culture differences without making making those with different cultural practices seem as innately 'other' or 'less than?'    

 

Tags: National Geographic, race, racismmedia

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World Population Growth

World Population Growth | Human and Physical Geography | Scoop.it
200 years ago there were less than one billion humans living on earth. Today, according to UN calculations there are over 7 billion of us.1 Recent estimates suggest that today's population size is roughly equivalent to 6.5% of the total number of people ever born.2 This is the most conspicuous fact about world population growth: for thousands of years, the population grew only slowly but in recent centuries, it has jumped dramatically. Between 1900 and 2000, the increase in world population was three times greater than during the entire previous history of humanity—an increase from 1.5 to 6.1 billion in just 100 years.

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Geography Teachers Association of SA's curator insight, February 8, 8:01 AM
This website is a rich source of information. Be sure to dig deep into this website - interesting articles on fertility, life expectancy, future population growth
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10 projections for the global population in 2050

10 projections for the global population in 2050 | Human and Physical Geography | Scoop.it
The global population is graying and growing rapidly. How big -- and how old -- will it be by 2050? (En 2050 le #Nigeria plus peuple que les #Etats-Unis. #africachange.

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Kelli Jones's curator insight, October 19, 2014 5:45 PM

It's interesting to see the different projections for population in the upcoming years. It is interesting to see the different models used to display population. 

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Oldest and Youngest Populations

Oldest and Youngest Populations | Human and Physical Geography | Scoop.it

"There are 1.2 billion people between the ages of 15 and 24 in the world today — and that means that many countries have populations younger than ever before.  Some believe that this 'youth bulge' helps fuel social unrest — particularly when combined with high levels of youth unemployment.  Youth unemployment is a 'global time bomb,' as long as today’s millennials remain 'hampered by weak economies, discrimination, and inequality of opportunity.'  The world’s 15 youngest countries are all in Africa.  Of the continent’s 200 million young people, about 75 million are unemployed.

On the flip side, an aging population presents a different set of problems: Japan and Germany are tied for the world’s oldest countries, with median ages of 46.1. Germany’s declining birth rate might mean that its population will decrease by 19 percent, shrinking to 66 million by 2060. An aging population has a huge economic impact: in Germany, it has meant a labor shortage, leaving jobs unfilled."


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Kristen Trammell's curator insight, March 23, 2015 12:05 PM

I. Using the data from CIA Facebook, global post created a map illustrating the median ages of countries around the world. The world’s fifteen youngest countries are all located in Africa. The high number of teenagers in developed countries leads to youth unemployment which leads to the countries being “hampered by weak economies.” 

 

II. The distribution of ages effects countries by “weak economies, discrimination, and inequality of opportunity.” Although countries with a fixed population of a young age can be detrimental, a country with an aging population can lead to a declining birth rate. This leads to labor shortages in the future which additionally stifles the economy.  

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 23, 2015 7:08 PM

Demographics seemingly started with age as a metric many years ago and have evolved into marketing tools, political footballs, and ways to combat everything from obesity to social security. Africa is clearly the youngest and probably for a very morbid reason; AIDS and Ebola among other diseases have taken their toll on the sexually active and thus have reduced the average age of their population.

Germany seems to be the place to go for a job as the labor shortage will mean higher wages for the folks who are left. Japan has another issue; a healthy aging population that will strain the government's ability to financially take care of them.

I wonder if the unevenness of Europe is an indication of the two World wars that were fought mostly on the turf. Did some countries lose more than others? If more soldiers, presumably of baby making age, perished did this affect the countries ability to keep pace with the Germany's and Spain's of Europe?

Diet seems to play a large part as well as the Mediterranean is well represented in terms of age. Does their healthy diet of fish, nuts, legumes and olive oil make a difference?

I could spend all day postulating, but I'll leave some of the findings for you to discover...

Deanna Metz's curator insight, March 1, 2016 8:05 PM

The median age of a population call be a quite telling statistic--almost a surrogate for a population pyramid.  I post this with a special attention to Sub-Saharan Africa; the youngest 15 countries in the world are all in Africa, one of the major demographic realities confronting African economies and politics.  Here is a map with the median age of U.S. counties.


Tag: population, demographic transition model, population pyramids.

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A World With 11 Billion People? New Population Projections Shatter Earlier Estimates

A World With 11 Billion People? New Population Projections Shatter Earlier Estimates | Human and Physical Geography | Scoop.it

"In a paper published Thursday in Science, demographers from several universities and the United Nations Population Division conclude that instead of leveling off in the second half of the 21st century, as the UN predicted less than a decade ago, the world's population will continue to grow beyond 2100."


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Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 24, 2015 1:23 AM

It is interesting to see the demographic transition model in real life effect. As time passes, underdeveloped countries will enter stage 3 of the demographic transition model and see a decline in birth rate and death rate remains relatively low. Most developing countries now will enter the very end of stage 3 and even stage 4 as birth rates balance of death rates. The real question is whether or not Earth will be able to sustain 11 billion people. It is scary to see the world in a rapid population boom. This population growth relates to the agricultural unit in that the use of GMO's is to accommodate the rapidly growing populations in the world.

Aaron Burnette's curator insight, September 8, 2015 9:25 AM

The population was originally predicted to level off in the next half century, but this is not the case by a long-shot, as predicted by the UN.

AHS Model UN's curator insight, November 19, 2015 2:12 PM

These articles from the Guardian and National Geographic were the first I'd heard of the new population projections for the future.  For many years it was assumed that the global population would level out at around 9 billion; while that is still within the range of possibilities but these new projections indicate that it is much more likely that the total global population will be much higher than that.  The geographic implications of this are far reaching.   

 

Tag: population, demographic transition model, unit 2 population.

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Graphic - Relative proportions of muslims, Al-Qaeda and the Taliban

Graphic - Relative proportions of muslims, Al-Qaeda and the Taliban | Human and Physical Geography | Scoop.it

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Satellite image - Where China and Kazakhstan Meet

Satellite image - Where China and Kazakhstan Meet | Human and Physical Geography | Scoop.it

While people often say that borders aren’t visible from space, the line between Kazakhstan and China could not be more clear in this satellite image. Acquired by the Landsat 8 satellite on September 9, 2013, the image shows northwestern China around the city of Qoqek and far eastern Kazakhstan near Lake Balqash.

 

The border between the two countries is defined by land-use policies. In China, land use is intense. Only 11.62 percent of China’s land is arable. Pressed by a need to produce food for more than 1.3 billion people, land that can be sustain agriculture is farmed intensely. Fields are dark green in contrast to the surrounding arid landscape, a sign that the agriculture is irrigated. As of 2006, about 65 percent of China’s fresh water goes to agriculture, irrigating 629,380 square kilometers (243,300 square miles) of farmland (an area slightly smaller than the state of Texas).


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What It Takes to End Poverty in Vietnam: Views From the Youth - YouTube

http://www.worldbank.org/vn - Almost 300 students across Vietnam shared their solutions on tackling poverty in the country. Share your views: http://www.worl...
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Africa: Is Development Sustainable? - YouTube

Africa performed very well in 2006, but based on the African Economic Outlook 2007 published by the OECD Development Centre and the African Development Bank,...
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Sustainable Development and Political Change

An interview with Gro Harlem Brundtland produced 1997 by NRK and Peter Ocskay for the Baltic University Programme. The interview was made for the TV-series M...
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