Depth Psychology
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Depth Psychology
Pioneered by William James, Sigmund Freud, and Carl Gustav Jung, Depth Psychology is the study of how we dialogue with the Unconscious via symbols, dreams, myth, art, nature. By paying attention to the messages that show up from beyond our conscious egos, we can be guided to greater understanding, transformation, and integration with the world around us, inner and outer. Follow depth psychology oriented articles and interviews at www.DepthInsights.com, or visit the online depth community at <a href="http://www.DepthPsychologyAlliance.com" rel="nofollow">www.DepthPsychologyAlliance.com</a>
Curated by Bonnie Bright
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Snake Symbol Significance in Dreams

Snake Symbol Significance in Dreams | Depth Psychology | Scoop.it

The ouroboros, the snake forever swallowing its own tail, is a famous alchemical symbol of transformation. Jung saw the ouroboros much like he saw the mandala, as an archetypal template of the psyche symbolizing eternity and the law of endless return. Instead of looking at life as a finite game played between the bookends of birth and death, the ouroboros symbolizes a dynamic state of change and purification.

 

A literal ouroboros isn’t necessary for a dream to have its symbolic meaning. Since waking life snakes routinely shed their skins, they are ready made symbols for change and transformation. Dreams where snakes shed skin or seeing snake skins in a dream also symbolize change and transformation. Old, outgrown behavioral patterns, relationships, or even... (Click title for more)

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What a Shaman Sees In a Mental Hospital

What a Shaman Sees In a Mental Hospital | Depth Psychology | Scoop.it

The Shamanic View of Mental Illness In the shamanic view, mental illness signals “the birth of a healer,” explains Malidoma Patrice Somé.  Thus, mental disorders are spiritual emergencies, spiritual crises, and need to be regarded as such to aid the healer in being born.

 

What those in the West view as mental illness, the Dagara people regard as “good news from the other world.”  The person going through the crisis has been chosen as a medium for a message to the community that needs to be communicated from the spirit realm. 


“Mental disorder, behavioral disorder of all kinds, signal the fact that two obviously incompatible energies have merged into the same field,” says Dr. Somé.  These disturbances result when the person does not get assistance in dealing with the presence of the energy from the spirit realm... (Click title for more)

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Foreword to the I Ching - By C. G. Jung

Foreword to the I Ching - By C. G. Jung | Depth Psychology | Scoop.it

Carl Jung's foreward to the "Book of Changes" about the IChing 

 

Since I am not a sinologue, a foreword to the Book of Changes from my hand must be a testimonial of my individual experience with this great and singular book. It also affords me a welcome opportunity to pay tribute again to the memory of my late friend, Richard Wilhelm. He himself was profoundly aware of the cultural significance of his translation of the I Ching, a version unrivaled in the West.

 

If the meaning of the Book of Changes were easy to grasp, the work would need no foreword. But this is far from being the case, for there is so much that is obscure about it that Western scholars have tended to dispose of it as a collection of "magic spells," either too abstruse to be intelligible, or of no value whatsoever. Legge's translation of the I Ching, up to now the only version available in English, has done little to make the work accessible to Western minds.[1]Wilhelm, however, has made every effort to open the way to an understanding of the symbolism of the text...

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Jungian Fairy Tale Interpretation

Jungian Fairy Tale Interpretation | Depth Psychology | Scoop.it

Who hasn’t remembered the experience of listening to a fairy tale as a child? Why were we so enthralled by these tales? Are these stories for adults or children? How do they differ from myths, legends and sagas?

 

I am going to interpret this fairy tale using a Jungian approach, and, as I do, try to explain some of the reasoning behind what I am doing. There are particular issues to bear in mind as we do this together : the whole tale is a description of the psychodynamics of an individuation process in one psyche, and, all characters in the tale represent structures in the psyche.

 

One thing I do know having worked with, and taught fairy tale interpretation, is that strong emotions are stirred up by our interaction with tales. People’s complexes and typology are constellated in uncanny ways through this work. The most common error one can make is to take a fairy tale character and expect human or... (Click title for more)

 

Bonnie Bright's insight:

#DepthPsych #Jungian

 

People’s complexes and typology are constellated in uncanny ways through fairy tales

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Eva Rider's curator insight, June 9, 2014 4:49 AM
Fairy tales really are incomparable teaching tools for us about the personal complexes and how they interface with the collective. The bridge matter and spirit via the cultural imagination. What is most extraordinary, I find, exploring them now, as an adult, is how precisely fairy tales detail the alchemical processes that point us towards Individuation and the redemption. They are a imagination's blueprint for the soul journey.
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The Art of Focus

The Art of Focus | Depth Psychology | Scoop.it
The secret to winning the internal battle against distraction is not to say “no” to trivial things but to say “yes” to powerful longings.

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Carl Jung and Jungian Analytical Psychology

Carl Jung and Jungian Analytical Psychology | Depth Psychology | Scoop.it
Jung saw in unconscious material, especially dreams and fantasies, an unfolding of a process of individuation - the idea of continual, lifelong personal development.

 

According to Jung, the Ego - the "I" or self-conscious faculty - has four inseparable functions, four fundamental ways of perceiving and interpreting reality: Thinking, Feeling, Sensation, and Intuition. Generally, we tend to favor our most developed function, which becomes dominant, while we can broaden our personality by developing the others. Jung noted that the unconscious often tends to reveal itself most easily through a person's least developed, or "inferior" function. The encounter with the unconscious and development of the underdeveloped function(s) thus tend to progress together.

 

Jung understood and acknowledged the enormous importance of sexuality in the development of the personality, but he perceived the unconscious as encompassing much more. In addition he saw in unconscious material, especially dreams and fantasies, an unfolding... (Click title for more)

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Animals in Mythology and Legend

Animals in Mythology and Legend | Depth Psychology | Scoop.it

Since the beginning of human history, people have lived in close contact with animals—usually as hunters and farmers—and have developed myths and legends about them. All kinds of creatures, from fierce leopards to tiny spiders, play important roles in mythology. A myth can give special meaning or extraordinary qualities to common animals such as frogs and bears. However, other creatures found in myths—many-headed monsters, dragons, and unicorns—never existed in the real world.

Animals may serve as stand-ins for humans or human characteristics, as in the African and Native American trickster tales or the fables of the Greek storyteller Aesop. In some legends, animals perform heroic deeds or act as mediators between heaven and earth. They may also be the source of the wisdom and power of a shaman.


Animals often have a dualistic quality in mythology. They can be helpful to humans or harmful—sometimes both. They provide people with food, but at the same time, they can be dangerous...Click title for more


Read more: http://www.mythencyclopedia.com/Am-Ar/Animals-in-Mythology.html#ixzz32nVaigwz

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Ancient warrior myths help veterans fight PTSD

Ancient warrior myths help veterans fight PTSD | Depth Psychology | Scoop.it

A soldier returns home from battle but has brought the war with him. He stares off into the distance, unable to take joy in his family or friends, still hyperalert to threats he no longer faces. Unable to heal his invisible wound, he takes his own life.

 

People have been struggling for thousands of years with the question of how war changes people and what their loved ones can do about it. Some of the answers to this huge social problem can be found in the past, says Michael Meade, who runs myth-filled retreats for veterans called “Voices of Veterans.” (The retreats are part of his larger Seattle-based nonprofit, Mosaic Voices.)

 

Meade calls himself a “mythologist,” and he uses ancient stories from Ireland, Greece, India and other cultures to prod veterans into unloading their experiences and making sense of them over four-day retreats on the West Coast. Veterans in Meade’s program also sing ancient warrior chants together, take part in a “forgiveness” ceremony, and write and recite poetry. He believes that many ancient cultures did a better job of formally welcoming returning warriors home and helping ... (click title for more)

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Symbols of the Minoan Goddess Religion

Symbols of the Minoan Goddess Religion | Depth Psychology | Scoop.it

The earliest goddess figurines found on Crete date from Neolithic times and thus from its first settlers, who supposedly came from Anatolia. The figurines belong to the age-old ”fat woman” tradition that began during the Paleolithic. These goddess-figurines were found together with figurines of birds and other animals, all typical of the whole Eurasian region since the Ice Age.

 

Marija Gimbutas believed that the labyris was a symbol of the Goddess as butterfly. The various stages of the life cycle of this insect can be seen as representing the cycle of life, death and rebirth – or resurrection.

The butterfly in itself frequents Minoan art both on Crete and the surrounding islands, and some places the connection with theGoddess seems obvious, such as this butterfly goddess.

 

The bee and beehives frequent Minoan imagery. The bee was obviously associated with the Goddess, since she is often shown as half woman, half bee. Her sacred snakes coil themselves around beehives... (click title for more)

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▶ Consumed - Is Our Consumer Culture Leading to Disaster? - YouTube

Consumerism has become the cornerstone of the post-industrial age. Yet how much do we know about it and what it is doing to us? Using theories of evolutionary psychology to underpin a bold narrative of our times, this film takes a whirlwind tour through the "weird mental illness of consumerism", showing how our insatiable appetite has driven us into "the jaws of the beast". Both an apocalyptic and redemptive view of the human condition.

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Climate on the Couch

Climate on the Couch | Depth Psychology | Scoop.it

Examining the psychological task of change, Mary-Jayne Rust looks at the ways in which we respond to the environmental crisis. How do old stories underlie our present reality?

 

While few people would now deny the reality of climate change and environmental crisis, many are still turning a blind eye to the situation we face. We are having great difficulty in making even the simplest of changes to our lives. The global scale of our crisis is overwhelming and it is easy to feel apathetic in response. This is made easier when our consumer lifestyles keep us well within our comfort zones.

When we do allow ourselves to feel, we might find a whole range of strong emotions, such as anxiety and fear about the future, despair at our lack of political will, grief for so many losses, guilt that we continue to be part of the cause, and more. While therapy has helped many of us to become more emotionally literate interpersonally, we are still a very stiff-upper-lip culture in relation to the bigger picture; when we block out our feelings, we lose touch with the urgency of crisis.


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Laura M. Smith's curator insight, May 17, 2014 9:39 AM

How do we move beyond the human skin to reclaim the vastness of our self?

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Storytelling and Wonder

Storytelling and Wonder | Depth Psychology | Scoop.it

In the prosperous land where I live, a mysterious task is underway to invigorate the minds of the populace, and to vitalize the spirits of our children. For a decade, now, parents, politicians, and educators of all forms have been raising funds to bring computers into every household in the realm, and into every classroom from kindergarten on up through college. With the new technology, it is hoped, children will learn to read much more efficiently, and will exercise their intelligence in rich new ways. Interacting with the wealth of information available on-line, children's minds will be able to develop and explore much more vigorously than was possible in earlier eras -- and so, it is hoped, they will be well prepared for the technological future.

 

How can any child resist such a glad initiative? Indeed, few adults  can resist the dazzle of the digital screen, with its instantaneous access to everywhere, its treasure-trove of virtual amusements, and its swift capacity to locate any piece of knowledge we desire. And why should we resist? Digital technology is transforming every field of human endeavor, and it promises to broaden the capabilities of the human intellect far beyond its current reach. Small wonder that we wish to open and extend this powerful dream to all our children!... (Click title for more)

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Can the Gods Be Revived?

Can the Gods Be Revived? | Depth Psychology | Scoop.it

In October 1913, psychiatrist CG Jung was riding a train in Western Europe. Suddenly, he was caught by an urgent inner vision of floods inundating the continent but sparing Switzerland. On the way back another vision rolled in, this time of seawater turned to blood.

Worried that he was losing his grip, Jung began what he called a "confrontation with the unconscious": a deliberate plunge into upwelling emotions and fantasies long held at bay. Not until a year later did he realize that the images assailing him on the train had signaled the coming outbreak of World War I.

 

Imagistic events that felt personal, Jung realized, could be triggered by collective occurrences. The individual was not psychologically separate from the time, then. "Because I carried the war in me," he wrote in his Red Book, "I foresaw it." By realizing this Jung placed himself beyond psychologies that limited themselves to the personal: my self, my family, my work, my relationships. "We make our era."

 

While teaching himself to use active imagination--basically a conscious daydream state--to dialogue with various figures of the imaginal psyche, Jung...(Click title for more)

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Eva Rider's curator insight, May 13, 2014 5:39 PM

Can the gods be revived in our time? Will imagination be the key to reawakening the gods and ensouling our radically change world?

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Soul Spelunker » Search for the Gods

Soul Spelunker » Search for the Gods | Depth Psychology | Scoop.it

The old alchemists used various ores in their work. They considered “metals as seeds” (Hillman 2522), lead being a seed of Saturn, copper a seed of Venus, silver a seed of the Moon, etc. These ores were not understood as objects separate from the imaginative minds of the observers. Just like seeds, they visualized them as possessing “encoded intentionality” (Hillman 2527), the innate tendency to fulfill their destinies, metamorphosing into what they were intended to become. These metals were viewed as ensouled entities, or what I would refer to as animaterial entities.


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Eva Rider's curator insight, June 17, 2014 4:56 AM

From Saturn to the Sun; Lead into Gold and all the rich nuance connecting the properties of alchemical metals to planetary energies. what feast for the archetypal astrologers and depth psychologists.. alchemists of the 21st C.

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The Psychoanalytic Muse: Edward Edinger: The Ego-Self Axis

The Psychoanalytic Muse: Edward Edinger: The Ego-Self Axis | Depth Psychology | Scoop.it

In what follows we shall be using three terms repeatedly to describe different forms of relatedness between ego and self. These terms should perhaps be introduced at the outset. They are: ego-self identity, ego-self separation, and ego-self axis. The meaning of these terms is indicated by the following figures representing progressive stages in the relationship between ego and self.


Clinical observation leads one to the conclusion that the integrity and stability of the ego depend in all stages of development on a living connection with the self...

Damage to the ego-self axis leads to ego-self alienation. In this condition the ego loses, to a greater or lesser extent, its vital contact with the self—the ego's origin and source of energy and stability. Although ego-self alienation ... (Click title for more)

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Carl Jung and I Ching

Carl Jung and I Ching | Depth Psychology | Scoop.it

In his introduction to the English version of I Ching made by one of his acquaintance, Jung admits having practiced the oracle 30 years before meeting Richard Wilhelm, the German translator of the book. He was interested in the method of exploration of the unconscious. He said:

 

"For more than thirty years I have interested myself in this oracle technique, or method of exploring the unconscious, for it has seemed to me of uncommon significance. I was already fairly familiar with the I Ching when I first met Wilhelm in the early nineteen twenties; he confirmed for me then what I already knew, and taught me many things more. (Foreword to the I Ching) ."

 

Using the oracle with his patients in psychotherapy Jung could remember a great deal of meaningful answers. He recalled the story of a patient stuck between ambivalent feelings related to... (Click title for more)

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Memories, Dreams, Reflections: A Rare Glimpse Inside Iconic Psychiatrist Carl Jung’s Mind

Memories, Dreams, Reflections: A Rare Glimpse Inside Iconic Psychiatrist Carl Jung’s Mind | Depth Psychology | Scoop.it
"…the sole purpose of human existence is to kindle a light in the darkness of mere being."

 

In the spring of 1957, at the age of 84, legendary psychiatrist Carl Jung (July 26, 1875–June 6, 1961) set out to tell his life’s story. He embarked upon a series of conversations with his colleague and friend, Aniela Jaffe, which he used as the basis for the text.

 

At times, so powerful was his drive for expression that he wrote entire chapters by hand. He continued to work on the manuscript until shortly before his death in 1961. The result was Memories, Dreams, Reflections — a fascinating peek behind the curtain of Jung’s mind, revealing... (Click title for more)

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Eva Rider's curator insight, June 21, 2014 12:47 AM

This is Jung's only autobiography and it continues to live and deepen our understanding into the humaness that was Jung and offer solace for those of us who seek meaning to the mysteries of the soul throughout life and beyond. I have it at my fingertips always.

 

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A Jungian Analyst Talks about Psychological Types

A Jungian Analyst Talks about Psychological Types | Depth Psychology | Scoop.it

John Beebe, M.D., is a Jungian analyst, editor of the San Francisco Jung Library Journal, co-editor of the Journal of Analytical Psychology, and an expert on Jung's psychological types.

While many people have become familiar with psychological types as a way of examining the differences between people, Dr. Beebe has been pioneering their use intrapsychically as a way to explore the depths of the psyche.


Trained at the Jung Institute in San Francisco with its strong tradition of interest in typology, in this wonderfully informal interview he gives us an intimate glimpse of what this neglected dimension of typology looks like in practice. He explains how his analysands often come to their own insights into their psychological types, and how he, himself, discovered the importance of dreams through his own depression, and encountered his own anima in the form of a Chinese laundress. And he deals with related questions about types and archetypes, and types and the inferior... (Click title for more)

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Re-awakening the Green Man

Re-awakening the Green Man | Depth Psychology | Scoop.it
The degradation of our environment is accelerating beyond the point of our being able to repair it. The problems are many and complex—from the destruction of our forests, to the dying off of our fish. Our impure air and water is causing worldwide increases in chronic diseases including severe challenge to our immune systems. Most threatening of all, climate change may raise temperatures and cause extreme weather conditions for thousands of years. Scientists and experts such as Al Gore can show us charts of what is happening, but the facts and figures don’t reach into the depth of our heart and motivate us to change.  Joanna Macy, author and deep ecologist says, “We need to love the world in order to save it.”  Using our intellect in this area is not enough; we need to feel an emotional connection to the planet. Advertisers know that the best way to stir us is through images and stories, often culled from myths that deeply affect our psyche...

 

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Types of Personality

Types of Personality | Depth Psychology | Scoop.it

The word “personality” often gets used pretty broadly today: we talk of someone “having personality” or “being a personality” – meaning that there’s something particularly expressive or obvious or typical about the way they conduct or express themselves; we talk about showbiz or sporting “personalities” – meaning they have a profile and a way about them that attracts attention.

 

Carl Jung’s theories have been around for almost 100 years now and are still very influential on the way that psychologists think about personality. As the table below illustrates, Jung proposed four pairs of “either or” mental preferences or what can be seen as “mental muscles”. We all have both preferences but one in each pair will be dominant over the other. Each item pair is described on the left of the chart with the word in red on the right explaining in one word what it is essentially targeting. Although this is certainly not the only way to classify personality, Jung’s model has been widely used on an... (Click title for more)

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Dorothy Retha Cook 's curator insight, October 4, 2017 4:17 PM

Now what type are you?

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This is what politicians debating global warming will look like soon

This is what politicians debating global warming will look like soon | Depth Psychology | Scoop.it
Awesome new street art unintentionally shames our leaders into paying attention to climate change.

 

“Politicians discussing global warming” — that’s what social media users have dubbed this tiny puddle sculpture by Spanish street artist Isaac Cordal.

 

The image has gone viral in the past few days and it’s obvious why. With sea levels projected to rise up to three feet by the end of the century, it's a stark reminder of our collective failure to act on climate change.

Or maybe not.

 

As it turns out, Cordal's sculpture is actually called “electoral campaign” and it's part of a larger street art installation called “Follow the leaders.” The tiny cement figures, arranged in bleak scenes of urban disintegration, represent the faceless businessmen who run our capitalist global order.

“These pieces reflect our own decline,” says Cordal. “We live immersed in the collapse of a system that needs change.”... (Click title for more)

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A New View of Depth Psychology's Link to the Astrological Tradition — A Review of Cosmos and Psyche: Intimations of a New World View by Richard Tarnas

A New View of Depth Psychology's Link to the Astrological Tradition — A Review of Cosmos and Psyche: Intimations of a New World View by Richard Tarnas | Depth Psychology | Scoop.it

As a practicing astrologer, I have studied many books on astrology but this new work by Richard Tarnas is by far the best one I have read in many years. Tarnas, a respected scholar and cultural historian, wrote his first book, The Passion of the Western Mind, in 1991. It was a best seller and is still widely used in universities today.


Tarnas describes his latest book, Cosmos and Psyche: Intimations of a New World View, as scandalous because it supports astrology by presenting the results of his 30 year long study of planetary alignments and how they correlate to historic patterns of human culture. This work outlines a fundamental transformation in the way we see and understand our world. He combines astrology with Jung's theories of archetypes, the collective unconscious and synchronicity. I believe that this book is destined to be a classic, not only among astrologers, but philosophers, historians and students of culture as well.


Cosmos and Psyche builds on the work of Carl Jung's idea of archetypes. Tarnas says, "We can define an archetype as a universal principle, or force that affects-impels, structures, permeates-the human psyche and the world of human experience...(Click title for more)

 

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Eva Rider's curator insight, May 23, 2014 4:17 AM

More on the astonishing, pivotal opus by Richard Tarnas.

Submerging oneself in this work subtly begins to dissolve, transform  and transfigure the lens through which self has gazed out at  the  universe throughout western recorded history.

A new paradigm carefully mapped, navigated and imagined with radiant hope as its compass.

 

 

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“The Red Book” by Carl Jung: A Primer For Healing Madness In A Mad World

“The Red Book” by Carl Jung: A Primer For Healing Madness In A Mad World | Depth Psychology | Scoop.it

Through his meticulous design of The Red Book, Carl G. Jung interwove his experience of madness with the collective suffering of his era. Such syntheses are rare — and just what the current mental health field desperately needs. In what follows, I look at how The Red Book became Jung’s journey out of madness as well as the foundation for his analytical psychology. Even today, over 50 years after his death, Jung’s analytical psychology is a relevant, non-pathologizing method for transcending madness, while also relating individual suffering to the larger collective.

The Ways of Jung’s World

In the early twentieth century, when Jung was “flooded” with “an enigmatic stream” that threatened to break him, the field of psychology was just beginning to make a science of the study of madness. Practitioners still acknowledged the wisdom of artists, novelists, and poets with regards to the nature of the human psyche. The soul was still in need of cure, and hearts were broken as much as brains. There were perhaps five diagnoses in use...(Click title for more)

 

 

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Ensouled on the Planet by Marion Woodman

Ensouled on the Planet by Marion Woodman | Depth Psychology | Scoop.it

NR: You have said we have to overcome our addictions before we can connect to nature.  Does our refusal to confront our addictions lead directly to our destruction of Mother Earth?

MW: I think so, yes. As children many of us feel a deep connection to Her.  But our culture warps our natural instincts. That warping leads to addictions.  But there’s a suicidal drive in the addicted individual and in the addicted society.  Our planet is coming up against the wall.  

Yet, despite all the horrors we have created, we are still doing precisely what we know will be ultimately destructive. Denial!  Denial!  We are still accepting a cultural value that annihilates the Earth. If we don’t change, we are going to our own extinction.  This is precisely what addicts do.  Addicts—in other words most of our society—pretend there’s nothing wrong.  As they laugh and talk and plan, they deny their dying souls.  That’s what we’re doing to the planet.  We fight about things that won’t matter if we are extinct...(Click title for more)

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Eva Rider's curator insight, December 4, 2014 2:59 AM

Marion Woodman Interviewed.

Eva Rider's curator insight, December 4, 2014 3:13 AM

Marion Woodman interviewed by Jungian Psychotherapist and writer, Marlene Schiwy. "Marion Woodman and the Conscious Feminine".

This is a series of 8 DVDs which are  the only available interviews in which Marion Woodman explores the creation and role of BodySoul work and her 30 year collaboration with Ann Skinner (renowned Voice Coach) and Mary Hamilton (Movement Teacher) in creating a Temenos for conjoining Psyche and Soma.

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On Being Human in a More-Than-Human World - David Abram

On Being Human in a More-Than-Human World - David Abram | Depth Psychology | Scoop.it

I have fallen in love outward.
—Robinson Jeffers, “The Tower Beyond Tragedy”

 

“Of course we humans are mightily special....Our opposable thumbs, our ability to balance and ambulate on our hind legs, our capacity for reflection, and our slyness with tools and ever-more-complex technologies entail that we are a pretty unique bunch.

 

But then again, that hawk soaring overhead is able to fly without any of the contrivances that we depend upon, and the apple tree over there is able to squeeze apples directly out of its limbs, which in itself is pretty damn unique, and a far cry from anything that I can muster with my own body.

 

Perhaps you could say that the compelling stories we two-leggeds regularly concoct could be called an efflorescence, or even a kind of fruit, like those apples. But still, the way that some whales dive to a depth of six thousand feet, holding their breath for over ninety minutes, seems another kind of astonishment, as is the journey of monarch butterflies. After overwintering in a small cluster of conifers in the Mexican highlands, the monarchs navigate their way north... (Click title for more)

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