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The Truth about Adult Dental Care Myths

The Truth about Adult Dental Care Myths | Dentistry Fun | Scoop.it
The Truth about Adult Dental Care Myths - While modern dentistry has become quite advanced, there are still a few common misconceptions about dental care, particularly as it relates to adults.
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Dissiper les mythes sur les soins dentaires pour les ados et les préados

Dissiper les mythes sur les soins dentaires pour les ados et les préados | Dentistry Fun | Scoop.it
Dissiper les mythes sur les soins dentaires pour les ados et les préados.
Il est compréhensible que les adolescents et les préados craignent une visite chez un spécialiste dentaire.
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10 Ways Vegetables Can Satisfy Your Sweet Tooth

10 Ways Vegetables Can Satisfy Your Sweet Tooth | Dentistry Fun | Scoop.it
When it comes to the Internet's favorite drool-worthy foods, the rule of thumb is typically the meatier, the better. It's impossible to surf Imgur for more than a minute without crossing a picture of bacon-wrapped anything.

Via Thomas Faltin
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Just in tme for the Holidays.....   

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Bioteeth From Stemcells Will Regrow Complete Tooth, Superior to Implants

Bioteeth From Stemcells Will Regrow Complete Tooth, Superior to Implants | Dentistry Fun | Scoop.it

Replacing missing teeth with new bioengineered teeth, grown from stem cells generated from a person's own gum cells, is a new method that will be vastly superior to the currently used implant technology.

 

New research, published in the Journal of Dental Research and led by Professor Paul Sharpe, an expert in craniofacial development and stem cell biology at King's College London's Dental Institute, describes advances in the development of this method by sourcing the required cells from a patient's own gum.

 

Research towards producing bioengineered teeth, also called bioteeth, aims to grow new and natural teeth by employing stem cell technology which generates immature teeth (teeth primordia) that mimic those in the embryo. These can be transplanted as small cell pellets into the adult jaw to develop into functional teeth, the researchers say.

 

Remarkably, despite the very different environments, embryonic teeth primordia can develop normally in the adult mouth. Embryonic tooth primordia cells can readily form immature teeth following dissociation into single cell populations and subsequent recombination, but such cell sources are impractical to use in a general therapy.

 

"What is required is the identification of adult sources of human epithelialand mesenchymal [stem] cells that can be obtained in sufficient numbers to make biotooth formation a viable alternative to dental implants," said Sharpe.

 

This challenge was now solved by the researchers, who sucessfully isolated adult human gum (gingival) tissue from patients at the Dental Institute at King's College London, grew more of it in the lab, and then combined it with the cells of mice that form teeth (mesenchyme cells). By transplanting this combination of cells into mice, the researchers were able to grow hybrid human/mouse teeth containing dentine and enamel, as well as viable roots.

 

"Epithelial cells derived from adult human gum tissue are capable of responding to tooth inducing signals from embryonic tooth mesenchyme in an appropriate way to contribute to tooth crown and root formation and give rise to relevant differentiated cell types, following in vitro culture," said Sharpe.

 

"These easily accessible epithelial cells are thus a realistic source for consideration in human biotooth formation. The next major challenge is to identify a way to culture adult human mesenchymal cells to be tooth-inducing, as at the moment we can only make embryonic mesenchymal cells do this."

 

Current implant-based methods of whole tooth replacement fail to reproduce a natural root structure and as a consequence of the friction from eating and other jaw movement, loss of jaw bone can occur around the implant.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Isn't science amazing?

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Coffee as medicine? Japanese scientists show how it helps the heart

Coffee as medicine? Japanese scientists show how it helps the heart | Dentistry Fun | Scoop.it
The next time you take a coffee break, you might want to consider a triple espresso. The extra caffeine may reduce your risk of dying from cardiovascular disease. (Coffee as medicine?
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OT:  Now this is good news!!

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Dispelling Top Myths about Orthodontic Care for Teens and Tweens

Dispelling Top Myths about Orthodontic Care for Teens and Tweens | Dentistry Fun | Scoop.it
Teens and tweens may experience some apprehension about seeing a dental specialist. Proper treatment now can provide children with the basis for a beautiful, healthy smile that will stay with them for the rest of their lives.
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Bioteeth From Stemcells Will Regrow Complete Tooth, Superior to Implants

Bioteeth From Stemcells Will Regrow Complete Tooth, Superior to Implants | Dentistry Fun | Scoop.it

Replacing missing teeth with new bioengineered teeth, grown from stem cells generated from a person's own gum cells, is a new method that will be vastly superior to the currently used implant technology.

 

New research, published in the Journal of Dental Research and led by Professor Paul Sharpe, an expert in craniofacial development and stem cell biology at King's College London's Dental Institute, describes advances in the development of this method by sourcing the required cells from a patient's own gum.

 

Research towards producing bioengineered teeth, also called bioteeth, aims to grow new and natural teeth by employing stem cell technology which generates immature teeth (teeth primordia) that mimic those in the embryo. These can be transplanted as small cell pellets into the adult jaw to develop into functional teeth, the researchers say.

 

Remarkably, despite the very different environments, embryonic teeth primordia can develop normally in the adult mouth. Embryonic tooth primordia cells can readily form immature teeth following dissociation into single cell populations and subsequent recombination, but such cell sources are impractical to use in a general therapy.

 

"What is required is the identification of adult sources of human epithelialand mesenchymal [stem] cells that can be obtained in sufficient numbers to make biotooth formation a viable alternative to dental implants," said Sharpe.

 

This challenge was now solved by the researchers, who sucessfully isolated adult human gum (gingival) tissue from patients at the Dental Institute at King's College London, grew more of it in the lab, and then combined it with the cells of mice that form teeth (mesenchyme cells). By transplanting this combination of cells into mice, the researchers were able to grow hybrid human/mouse teeth containing dentine and enamel, as well as viable roots.

 

"Epithelial cells derived from adult human gum tissue are capable of responding to tooth inducing signals from embryonic tooth mesenchyme in an appropriate way to contribute to tooth crown and root formation and give rise to relevant differentiated cell types, following in vitro culture," said Sharpe.

 

"These easily accessible epithelial cells are thus a realistic source for consideration in human biotooth formation. The next major challenge is to identify a way to culture adult human mesenchymal cells to be tooth-inducing, as at the moment we can only make embryonic mesenchymal cells do this."

 

Current implant-based methods of whole tooth replacement fail to reproduce a natural root structure and as a consequence of the friction from eating and other jaw movement, loss of jaw bone can occur around the implant.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Jennifer Frezza
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Jennifer Frezza 's curator insight, December 8, 2013 6:28 PM

Isn't science amazing?

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New Wi-Fi-Enabled Tooth Sensor Reports You When You Smoke or Overeat

New Wi-Fi-Enabled Tooth Sensor Reports You When You Smoke or Overeat | Dentistry Fun | Scoop.it
Scientists have invented a tooth sensor that sends health data to your doctor's smartphone directly from your mouth.

 

Lying through your teeth just took on a whole new meaning. Cigarettes, drinking, eating too much or too little food—we all have our vices, and vices are hard to drop. When, say, New Years rolls around, it’s easy to make promises to cut them out with no intention of following through.

 

That’s why this new invention, a wi-fi-enabled tooth sensor, is so intriguing. Researchers at National Taiwan University have created a tooth-embedded sensor that will catch you in an unhealthy act, whatever it may be, and lets your doctor know so he can shame you during your next checkup. The sensor consists of a tiny circuit that fits inside a tooth cavity and can be rigged into dentures and dental braces. The circuit is able to recognize the jaw motions of drinking, chewing, coughing, speaking, and smoking, and the results get sent directly to your doctor’s smartphone.

 

To test the prototype, Hao-hua Chu and his team at the university secured the sensor into eight people, and the results were promising. Although the prototype is hooked up to an external wire, the sensor correctly identified oral activities and motions 94% of the time. The next step will be installing a rechargeable internal battery and wireless communication. Researchers are also looking into constructing a recharging and storage unit “similar to that of an electric toothbrush,” since some users must remove artificial teeth before sticking the sensor in.

 

“Because the mouth is an opening into human health, this oral sensory system has the potential to enhance exiting oral-related healthcare monitoring applications such as dietary tracking,” the study says.

 

Safety is still a big concern, though. The prototype needed to be attached to a tether so participants don’t swallow the device, and so the electronics remain intact when wet. A Bluetooth radio is also on the list of things to add, and can make it easier for researchers and doctors to keep tabs on the results.

 

"This could have a number of uses in dentistry, for example as a research tool, for monitoring patients who clench or grind their teeth, and for assessing the impact of various dental interventions,” Trevor Johnson, vice-chair of research at the Faculty of General Dental Practice, explained.

 

If the sensor gets all the appropriate adjustments, it has the potential to curb all kinds of addictions. One of them is smoking. In 2011, 43.8 million American were smokers, according to statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — and that number just includes adults. Each day in the United States, nearly 4,000 people under 18 try their first cigarette, and almost 1,000 become daily smokers. But a staggering 69% of these smokers are looking for a way to quit completely. This new sensor could help.

 

The research will be presented at the International Symposium on Wearable Computers in September. Until then, maybe it’s time to try stopping your bad habits yourself.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Would you consider using a product like this?   Pros?  Cons?

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3 Habits That Can Damage Your Teeth | Wcupw.com

3 Habits That Can Damage Your Teeth | Wcupw.com | Dentistry Fun | Scoop.it
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Custom mouth guards protect your smile.  Contact us for more info.

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Teenage diver Russell Laman has teeth cleaned by a shrimp after ...

Teenage diver Russell Laman has teeth cleaned by a shrimp after ... | Dentistry Fun | Scoop.it
Having your teeth picked clean by a shrimp after enticing it into your mouth is certainly more exotic than using a tube of toothpaste.
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Raise your hand by clicking "Like" -   Who'd try this?

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