Dementia-Alzheimer's
193 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Claire Hoffmann
Scoop.it!

Seth Rogen's Opening Statement- Alzheimer's

Actor Seth Rogen gives his opening statement before a Senate hearing on Alzheimer's Research. From C-SPAN3 coverage, watch the complete hearing here: http://...
Claire Hoffmann's insight:

Before a senate hearing on Alzheimer's research, actor/comedian Seth Rogan opened with his personal experiences with Alzheimer's, and how it affects people close to him. He noted that he didn't quite realize the shame and stigma associated with Dementia until it hit close to home. I think that's true for nearly all mental illnesses unfortunately and its something that needs to change.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Claire Hoffmann
Scoop.it!

Rapid Progression of Alzheimer's - YouTube

Interview with Alzheimer's patient rapidly losing and his ability to communicate with his wife and difficulties with diagnosis. http://www.cif.us.com
Claire Hoffmann's insight:

The previous video showed very early stages of Alzheimer's- high functioning with few symptoms. This video shows the rapid progression of the disease, and how quickly it eats away at a high functioning individual as it progresses.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Claire Hoffmann
Scoop.it!

Differences Between Dementia & Alzheimer’s

Differences Between Dementia & Alzheimer’s | Dementia-Alzheimer's | Scoop.it
Dementia is not a specific disease. Alzheimer's is the most common cause of dementia. Learn the differences between them including cause, and symptoms.
Claire Hoffmann's insight:

This is a more factual image/article, but I thought it was important point that Alzheimer's and Dementia are different. Dementia is an umbrella term for a set of symptoms that could be due to a number of actual diseases- one of which includes Alzheimer's.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Claire Hoffmann
Scoop.it!

Advice On Caring For Alzheimer's Patients

Advice On Caring For Alzheimer's Patients | Dementia-Alzheimer's | Scoop.it
Claire Hoffmann's insight:

Alzheimer's swallows a person, changes their memories, warps their perception, and twists their words. Reading several firsthand stories, it seems the hardest part of Alzheimer's is watching a loved one being consumed and changed by something out of their control. It is death in a sense, although not immediately physical. This quote was powerful, as it really depicts the fact that above all, Alzheimer's patients may want others to know that most of what they do is the disease, not them.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Claire Hoffmann
Scoop.it!

Etta's Story | Alzheimer's Association

Etta's Story | Alzheimer's Association | Dementia-Alzheimer's | Scoop.it
Etta's Story | Alzheimer's Association
Claire Hoffmann's insight:

"Remember, above all – human beings get Alzheimer's. We are all human and want to be treated with kindness at all times, and then the rest will fall into place." (Etta)

Etta's story was a powerful reminder of the compassion, loyalty and care humans are capable of- even in the face of watching a friend's self-control and memory retreat. Etta sacrifices a normal life- the ability to run errands, go to church, or to the movies- almost becoming equally impaired, for the mere sake of caring for a friend.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Claire Hoffmann
Scoop.it!

Blood test predicts Alzheimer's disease

Blood test predicts Alzheimer's disease | Dementia-Alzheimer's | Scoop.it
Researchers have developed a blood test that predicts whether a healthy person will develop Alzheimer's disease.
Claire Hoffmann's insight:

It was very recently discovered that low levels of 10 particular lipids are present in most of those who already have Alzheimer's. Utilizing this new-found knowledge, the recently developed blood test predicts the development of this disease with 90% accuracy.

 

Whether or not people would WANT to know that their memory and mental function are destined to slowly degrade is the question, although these findings will allow for experimental drugs/research to be conducted perhaps long before the symptoms develop.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Claire Hoffmann
Scoop.it!

Terry Pratchett: I'm slipping away a bit at a time... and all I can do is watch it happen

Terry Pratchett: I'm slipping away a bit at a time... and all I can do is watch it happen | Dementia-Alzheimer's | Scoop.it
'When you have cancer, you're a brave battler. When you have dementia, you're on your own...' With devastating honesty, author Terry Pratchett describes his daily struggle with Alzheimer's
Claire Hoffmann's insight:

Many of the stories are told from he care-givers point of view, which only gives readers a look at what Alzheimer's looks like- rather than what it FEELS like. In this article, Terry Pratchett talks about her personal experience with Alzheimer's, and how it has begun to affect her life. A powerful point in this story was the realization that there is no getting better, so you are not only living with Alzheimer's, but also living with the knowledge of having Alzheimer's.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Claire Hoffmann
Scoop.it!

Extended Interview with Alzheimer's Patient, Don Hayen

http://www.kpbs.org/alzheimers Don Hayen is a retired doctor and former medical director of an HMO. He was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease in 2005, at age...
Claire Hoffmann's insight:

This video was an interesting look at onset and the early stages of Alzheimer's. Don Hayen has not been officially diagnosed because of how early and non apparent it is. He describes his initial worries about " anger outbursts" and momentarily forgetting where he was. However, he says he can usually get away with hiding these symptoms.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Claire Hoffmann
Scoop.it!

Losing Sue: A Story About Alzheimer's Disease

Losing Sue: A Story About Alzheimer's Disease | Dementia-Alzheimer's | Scoop.it
Susan Israel-Schieli seemed to have it all: a great career, a terrific husband, two beautiful daughters, and a close-knit extended family. Then, at 49, she was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's disease and her world started slowly slipping away. Sue can't tell her own story, so here it is in the words of the people who love her most.
Claire Hoffmann's insight:

This was a fascinating story as it outlined the decline of Sue and her Alzheimer's from multiple perspectives. Her two sisters, doctor, husband, daughters, mother-in-law, brother, and sister-in-law all gave accounts of her decline. This was truly a 360 degree look on the lives affected by the disease.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Claire Hoffmann
Scoop.it!

Alzheimer's Deaths May Rival Cancer, Heart Disease, Study Finds

Alzheimer's Deaths May Rival Cancer, Heart Disease, Study Finds | Dementia-Alzheimer's | Scoop.it
Alzheimer’s disease may be killing more than 500,000 people in the U.S. each year, making it possibly the third leading killer behind heart disease and cance...
Claire Hoffmann's insight:

This article sheds light on the severity of Alzheimer's. Although mostly factual, it is hugely important to understand how badly dementia/Alzheimer's research needs to be funded. It is definitely not regarded as being on the same tier as cancer or aids in terms of urgency and severity which is a problem. Lives are lives no matter how old or young, and lack of well-being, regardless of cause, should be regarded equally.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Claire Hoffmann
Scoop.it!

Alzheimer's Blood Test Raises Ethical Questions

Alzheimer's Blood Test Raises Ethical Questions | Dementia-Alzheimer's | Scoop.it
A new blood test for people in their 70s can detect who will develop Alzheimer's disease. A positive result could help people prepare. But since there's no treatment, will people really want to know?
Claire Hoffmann's insight:

Is it ethical to alert individuals that they will develop a debilitating mental imparity within the next few years? This news would surely effect the individual's well-being, and disrupt the sense of normality in both how they live and how others treat them.

 

On the other hand, it would allow for practical future planning. Preparedness could after all be the best way to manage the disease.

more...
No comment yet.