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'Octomom' sets egg-brooding record - Magazine article

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Starting in 2007, Bruce Robinson from a research institute in Moss Landing, California sent a remote operated vehicle down 1,397 meters  into the Monterey Canyon. It was here where he, along with his colleagues found a deep-sea octopus. About a month later they noticed that the octopus was developing 155 to 165 eggs. The octopus was observed for a long 53 months up until September of 2011, which is recorded as the longest brooding period of any known animal. Because this observation lasted 4 years and the octopus brooded her eggs for the longest time recorded for any animal in history, this article from Science News is deemed credible as it was written just recently a couple months ago in September of 2014 and is displayed in the GREENR database. This article very much relates to the topic of the deep ocean biome because it symbolizes just how astonishing the deep ocean is, given its extreme mystery and little exploration. Life in the deep sea must withstand total darkness, extreme cold, and great pressure. Because of the ambiguity of this biome, this article offers a unique and interesting look into the world of the deep ocean and how the powerful findings here can contribute to science. This topic has very little bias, and there was none found within this article.  

 

Citation

Brookshire, Bethany. "'Octomom' Sets Egg-brooding Record." GREENR. 6 Sept. 2014. Web. 9 Dec. 2014.

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Potential Deep-Sea Mining of Seafloor Massive Sulfides- Case Study

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Although this case study is rather long, it fully emphasizes how seafloor massive sulfides have the potential to become a significant mineral resource. This study considers the environmental and technological aspects of Deep Sea Mining using the Papua New Guinea project as a case study. This case study was published in 2006 but was electronically published in 2011 after further stages of exploration. This source is credible as it can be found on the research institute page of the Bren School of Environmental Science at the University of Santa Barbara. Throughout the study, the researchers worked with the Under Mining Institute (UMI) and coordinated with the International Seabed Authority. This source is relevant to the deep ocean biome because it provides a deep analysis on how mineral resources are becoming increasingly difficult to extract on land. Recent research in the deep-sea has identified rich ore deposits that may be economically extractable through the development of deep-sea mining. Deep-sea mining offers an environment where the mining is cheaper than terrestrial mining. This allows researchers and scientists to understand that there is more than life that is unknown in the deep sea. This biome offers far more. Throughout the case study, there was little found bias and could possibly serve as a counterargument against previous research.

 

 

 

Citation

Birney, Kristi, Amber Griffin, Jonathan Gwiazda, Johnny Kefauver, Takehiko Nagai, and Douglas Varchol. "Potential Deep-Sea Mining of Seafloor Massive Sulfides: A Case Study in Papua New Guinea." (2006): 1-102. Bren School of Environmental Science and Management, 5 May 2011. Web. 9 Dec. 2014.

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Human Impact - Brief Article

Science in Context
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This article is very short but also recent. It briefly discusses human actions regarding the biome. Because it was published in November of 2013 it is fairly recent. It is relevant to the topic of the Deep Sea biome because it addresses how it impacts humans, and their impacts on the biome. This information is necessary to have a deeper understanding of the topic. While it may be questioned that this article was published through a website ending with ".com," it was filtered through the Science in Context database, showing that it has qualifying credentials. The information was also well-written and had no bias or opinion, so it appears accurate. The information was published to provide information about the status of fishing in the deep sea oceans, and serves no other purpose. All of these factors indicate that the source is very reliable and relevant.

 

Citation

"Deep-sea trawling." Nature 503.7475 (2013): 170. Science in Context. Web. 8 Dec. 2014.

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Deep Sea Findings - News article

Science in Context
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This article was just published earlier this year, in 2014, so it is very recent. It addresses information about life found in the deep sea, and recent fossil discoveries. It consists mainly of quotes describing what was found, and is very relevant to the deep sea biome. This is mainly because it includes information about life found in the biome, as well as life previously found in the biome. This was published by a news source, however the news source got its information from the University of Portsmouth, a credible source. Unlike most of the other articles, this one actually had some controversy. It provided ideas that contradicted previously believed ideas. However, this does not mean that it is an inaccurate source. The findings it discussed made sense scientifically, and there was no bias in the tone. It simply indicated that the evidence it presented contradicted previous evidence. It was published to show the findings of the new research, and to possibly serve as a counterargument against previous research.

 

Citation

"UNIVERSITY OF PORTSMOUTH -Deep sea findings overturn previous research."ENP Newswire 29 May 2014. Science in Context. Web. 8 Dec. 2014.

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Geothermal Deep-Ocean Vents - Journal Article

Science in Context
Anna S's insight:

This article provides a brief overview describing life that can be found in the deep ocean, and discusses factors that limit their life. While it was originally published in 2003, it was updated in February of 2013 so it's information is very current. This article is relevant to the topic of the deep ocean biome because it gives many examples of the type of life that can be found there. It was published by World of Earth Science, and was found on the Science in Context database. Because it was found on a reliable database, the source is deemed reputable. Based on some background knowledge, all of the content made sense within the article. It was all backed up with worthy evidence, so the information was decided to be accurate. Currently, little is known about the deep ocean, as it remains fairly unexplored. This article was produced to provide more information that sums up findings about the biome, and to provide reference information. This topic also generally has very little bias, and there was none found within the article. In this article information can be found about primary production (it is not specially stated, rather implied), and limiting factors. 

 

Citation

"Geothermal deep-ocean vents." World of Earth Science. Ed. K. Lee Lerner and Brenda Wilmoth Lerner. Detroit: Gale, 2003. Science in Context. Web. 8 Dec. 2014.

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Deep Sea Biome Overview - Informational Website

Deep Sea Biome Overview - Informational Website | Deep Ocean | Scoop.it
Biomes of the World -
Anna S's insight:

This article is a good resources that includes many of the basic components of the deep sea biome. All pages were updated in 2012, so the information is fairly current. It was rather difficult to find basic information that provided a reliable overview of the topic, but this website does just that. It's information is very relevant, because it covers exactly what is needed to understand the deep sea biome. The author of the website is Dr. Susan Woodward, a professor in the department of geospatial science at Radford University. Her status as a professor at a university shows that she has decent credentials and would write an accurate article. The information found within the website seems to match other information that has been found, and nothing has contradicted anything previously found. The bottom of the page also mentions that the website is licensed under Creative Commons, and states that the information can be used with proper citations. This indicates that the information is worth licensing, so it is accurate. The information found within the website had no bias or personal opinion. It was published solely to provide information about the biome.

 

Citation

Woodward, Susan. "Deep Sea." Biomes of the World. Radford University, 1 Jan. 2012. Web. 9 Dec. 2014. <https://php.radford.edu/~swoodwar/biomes/?page_id=131>.

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The astonishing hidden world of the deep ocean - Video

The astonishing hidden world of the deep ocean - Video | Deep Ocean | Scoop.it
Ocean explorer Robert Ballard takes us on a mindbending trip to hidden worlds underwater, where he and other researchers are finding unexpected life, resources, even new mountains. He makes a case for serious exploration and mapping. Google Ocean, anyone?
Anna S's insight:

While this source is not as current as some of the others, it is still current enough, as it was published in 2008. This resource does not focus as much on the life or other characteristics found in the biome as other resources. However, it serves as a good reminder that there is still a lot that we do not know about the biome. There are most likely countless species that remain undiscovered, and many different studies that have not been conducted. The source also has very good credentials, the speaker, Robert Ballard, is the actual person behind a lot of research for the biome. He has conducted over 100 expeditions underwater, and discovered many of the things we know about the deep ocean (including deep-sea vents). While the video discusses new ideas, all of the other content matched content from other sources. It was also presented on ted.com, which is known to gather reliable, accomplished people to lecture or share their story. This source obviously was created to share current knowledge of the deep ocean, but also to demonstrate how little we actually know about it. This purpose does not affect the validity of the information he presented, so everything was very accurate and relevant. In this source information can be found about some of the life found in the deep ocean

 

Citation

allard, Robert. "The astonishing hidden world of the deep ocean." TED., . 1 Feb. 2008. Lecture.

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'Octomom' sets egg-brooding record - Magazine article

Anna S's insight:

Starting in 2007, Bruce Robinson from a research institute in Moss Landing, California sent a remote operated vehicle down 1,397 meters  into the Monterey Canyon. It was here where he, along with his colleagues found a deep-sea octopus. About a month later they noticed that the octopus was developing 155 to 165 eggs. The octopus was observed for a long 53 months up until September of 2011, which is recorded as the longest brooding period of any known animal. Because this observation lasted 4 years and the octopus brooded her eggs for the longest time recorded for any animal in history, this article from Science News is deemed credible as it was written just recently a couple months ago in September of 2014 and is displayed in the GREENR database. This article very much relates to the topic of the deep ocean biome because it symbolizes just how astonishing the deep ocean is, given its extreme mystery and little exploration. Life in the deep sea must withstand total darkness, extreme cold, and great pressure. Because of the ambiguity of this biome, this article offers a unique and interesting look into the world of the deep ocean and how the powerful findings here can contribute to science. This topic has very little bias, and there was none found within this article.  

 

Citation

Brookshire, Bethany. "'Octomom' Sets Egg-brooding Record." GREENR. 6 Sept. 2014. Web. 9 Dec. 2014.

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