Deep Earth Michael Hu
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San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth

San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth | Deep Earth Michael Hu | Scoop.it

USGS Earthquake Hazards Program, responsible for monitoring, reporting, and researching earthquakes and earthquake hazards... Basically this has information about how they measure and position the earthquake measuring outpost.


Via Antoine Genesi, Cal Crockett
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Google Image Result for http://www.mininghistory.asn.au/wp-content/uploads/2010/02/aust-map-copy2.jpg

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Christchurch earthquake

The 2011 Christchurch earthquake was a 6.3 magnitude earthquake which struck the South Island of New Zealand at 12:51 pm on 22 February 2011 NZT. (This is 23:51 21 February UTC). It was about 5 km underground. It struck the Canterbury region of the island and caused a lot of damage and many deaths in Christchurch, New Zealand's second largest city.
It was the largest aftershock of the 4 September 2010 Canterbury earthquake, although it is being regarded as a separate earthquake. It was smaller than the September earthquake, but it was more damaging because it was closer to Christchurch and nearer to the surface of the earth. It also happened at lunchtime on a Tuesday compared to before dawn on a Saturday, which meant that more people were outside and in danger of being injured by falling buildings. Buildings were also already weakened from the previous quakes. The intensity felt in Christchurch was MM VIII.
Prime Minister John Key said that 22 February "may well be New Zealand's darkest day". At least 166 people have been confirmed dead with the final death toll expected to be over 200.


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Giant Crystal Cave Comes to Light

Giant Crystal Cave Comes to Light | Deep Earth Michael Hu | Scoop.it

April 9, 2007—Geologist Juan Manuel García-Ruiz calls it "the Sistine Chapel of crystals.

A sort of south-of-the-border Fortress of Solitude, Mexico's Cueva de los Cristales (Cave of Crystals) contains some of the world's largest known natural crystals—translucent beams of gypsum as long as 36 feet (11 meters). 

How did the crystals reach such superheroic proportions? 

In the new issue of the journal Geology,García-Ruiz reports that for millennia the crystals thrived in the cave's extremely rare and stable natural environment. Temperatures hovered consistently around a steamy 136 degrees Fahrenheit (58 degrees Celsius), and the cave was filled with mineral-rich water that drove the crystals' growth. 

Modern-day mining operations exposed the natural wonder by pumping water out of the 30-by-90-foot (10-by-30-meter) cave, which was found in 2000 near the town of Delicias. Now García-Ruiz is advising the mining company to preserve the caves. 

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