Death and Social Media
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Tools for Managing Your Online Life After Death - TIME

Tools for Managing Your Online Life After Death - TIME | Death and Social Media | Scoop.it
Hotmail lets relatives order a CD of all the messages in a deceased user's account if they provide a death certificate and proof of power of attorney. Gmail requires the same paperwork plus a copy of...
Joseph Votaw's insight:

These tools will need to be buffed up at some point and there will have to be an easier, more universal method to deal with dormant accounts of those who have died. We are so relatively close to the beginnings of social media that as time passes these tools will need to be reworked. One thing about this article stuck out to me though. Most of these online services do their best to respect the privacy of those who have died by not allowing even family to view things that would not be able to be accessed without a password. However, Hotmail, as outdated as it is, will send a CD of ALL of a users emails to the family of the deceased. This seems like an insane breach of privacy. Will my family be able to order a CD of the emails I wrote in 8th grade on my hotmail account? I can only hope not, for their sake.

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Charlotte Dawson's death throws spotlight on cyber bullying

Charlotte Dawson's death throws spotlight on cyber bullying | Death and Social Media | Scoop.it
Social media can be "very risky" for people suffering from mental illness, an expert says.
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Celebrity's must have it hard, especially those who are very sensitive to negative criticism from people on the internet. It's very, very easy to write a scathing, destroying, mean spirited tweet to a celebrity, and they just have to learn to roll with the punches. Unfortunately not everyone is able to do so which will ultimately end in situations like this.

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Unexpected tweets come from “RickCaffeinated” after death

Unexpected tweets come from “RickCaffeinated”  after death | Death and Social Media | Scoop.it
Social media websites have changed the way the world connects, and it appears they have also changed how we can connect once we're gone.
Joseph Votaw's insight:

This is an interesting phenomenon related to death on social media that I am sure will become more and more common as the millennial generation grows older and dies. What will happen to those accounts that have been automated? I wouldn't be surprised if Twitter eventually segregates long dormant accounts from it's active ones, which would create an interesting situation for those who have perhaps died long ago, but due to automation still tweet regularly.

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What Does Social Media Mean for the Future of Mortality? [VIDEO]

What Does Social Media Mean for the Future of Mortality? [VIDEO] | Death and Social Media | Scoop.it
With 48 hours of video being uploaded to YouTube every minute, 200 million tweets being posted every day and the average Facebook user creating 90 pieces of content each month, ...
Joseph Votaw's insight:

This is a scary vision for the future, and very realistic. Will we be able to have human robots coded to have the personality of those who have died? It is a very reasonable outcome, far off in the future, strangely enough. This has implications not just for the internet, or technology, but for life and consciousness itself.

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4Chan suicide attempt: 200 people watch live stream of young man trying to set himself on fire, encouraging 'Stephen' to take his own life

4Chan suicide attempt: 200 people watch live stream of young man trying to set himself on fire, encouraging 'Stephen' to take his own life | Death and Social Media | Scoop.it
A young man has attempted to burn himself to death on a live stream watched by 200 encouraging people on the internet.
Joseph Votaw's insight:

The internet has a lot of crazy people on it. Broadcasting your own suicide on the internet may not be the most logical thing to do, but watching someone else do it while live commenting on it is even worse. This is how infinitely versatile the internet is, ANYTHING can be done on it.

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Japan's Lost Generation Finds Solace In Suicide

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Online suicide pacts are an interesting internet phenomenon. Who would have thought that the social aspect of the internet would be used to encourage group suicide? In some ways this is similar to the "flash mob"--encouraging a group of people to anonymously sign up and take part in a communal event.

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Popeyes Lady Died? Commercial Actress Deidrie Henry Becomes Victim of Internet Death Hoax

Popeyes Lady Died? Commercial Actress Deidrie Henry Becomes Victim of Internet Death Hoax | Death and Social Media | Scoop.it
The Popeye's lady, Annie, aka Diedrie Henry is dead. At least that's what social media sites are saying. However Diedrie Henry didn't die. She's just the victim of an Internet death hoax.
Joseph Votaw's insight:

There are many other celebrity death hoaxes that are more prevalent, but Popeyes means a lot to me--they have the best combo deals. Regardless, the internet for some reason loves to start death hoaxes. Why? The easiness of sharing and spreading controversial statements on the internet and the fact that people want to be in on the know, so that if they see a tweet about a celebrity dying before anyone else, chances are they will want to share it to get the word out.

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Internet Loses It over Death of an Iconic Family Guy Character

Internet Loses It over Death of an Iconic Family Guy Character | Death and Social Media | Scoop.it
We lost a big family guy character this week, and fans have taken to Twitter to voice their outrage, because that's what the Internet is for.
Joseph Votaw's insight:

Why does the internet care so much about an annoying character dying on a mediocre show? Because they can. Social Media allows us to discuss even the most mundane of topics with fervor.

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On Social Media, Americans React To Bin Laden Death

On Social Media, Americans React To Bin Laden Death | Death and Social Media | Scoop.it
On Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and news blogs, reactions are evolving at seemingly the same rate that these digital outlets are pushing out news of the U.S. military operation that finally took out the al-Qaida leader.
Joseph Votaw's insight:

This article discusses how social media won over traditional media in terms of timeliness in delivering news--a trend surely to continue. Maybe some time far from now there will be no cable television--all content would be found online, including the news. The idea of paying 50 dollars a month for a service that doesn't give you complete control will seem barbaric. Regardless, this article also mentions the ethical dilemma of celebrating a death, an interesting topic that is much easier now with social networks and the ability to interact and communicate with immediacy.

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Digital permanence: What goes on the Internet stays on the Internet | ThreeSixty

Digital permanence: What goes on the Internet stays on the Internet | ThreeSixty | Death and Social Media | Scoop.it
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Another interesting article about the permanence of the internet. Is social media the key to immortality? Is it almost three in the morning? The answer to both of those questions is "probably". The millennial generations almost entire life span will be documented on social networks--the first generation of many, more than likely--and how this affects society will only be clear in time. 

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Kate Granger (GrangerKate) on Twitter

Kate Granger (GrangerKate) on Twitter | Death and Social Media | Scoop.it
Joseph Votaw's insight:

Kate Grangers twitter has been mentioned in several other articles I have shared but it warrants a look. This woman's battle with cancer is entirely public--she shares thoughts on the nurses, how she is feeling, treatment, etc. This kind of writing, short form public journalling with an interactive, social element, did not exist, could not exist, and would be almost unfathomable just fifteen years ago.

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Scott Simon and Tweeting About Death

Scott Simon and Tweeting About Death | Death and Social Media | Scoop.it
Facebook and Twitter are changing the way we mourn—rescuing America from a world where grief was largely silenced and creating, instead, a kind of public space for it.
Joseph Votaw's insight:

Discussing death on social networks will define how it is viewed by the millennial generation. These stories of those who are dealing with death and their activities on social media are just the beginnings of a trend that I am sure will continue to become a large, important part of our online culture.

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As memories stay online, social companies like Facebook must find better ways to help grieving families

As memories stay online, social companies like Facebook must find better ways to help grieving families | Death and Social Media | Scoop.it
In a moving story, a father begged Facebook to share a video of his dead son. The story had a happy ending, but points to growing tech companies and families for control of our memories.
Joseph Votaw's insight:

As the generation "hip" to the social media scene gets older, cases like this will become so common that Facebook, Google, Microsoft, Amazon--any site with online profiles--will need to start thinking of how to deal with all of these instances in a broader, more universal way. This article discusses another pertinent topic: who owns the digital data that belongs to the deceased? Who can access the private data? Can anyone? Before social media (as in 15 years ago) if you didn't want someone to read a message you had sent you simply threw out the letter. While private messaging is only one finger of this highly complex hand, dealing with the private side of social media is going to become a large issue in our lifetimes.

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The New Afterlife

The New Afterlife | Death and Social Media | Scoop.it
Death ends a life, but not a soul. The spirit lives on. But where does Facebook enter the picture? Does a Facebook profile get buried like a body? Or does it become a living spirit?
Joseph Votaw's insight:

The fear of missing out (FOMO) phenomenon is very relevant to death on social media. When someone on my friends list died several years ago, I noticed many people who I knew were not very close to the person posting on his wall, saying how much they missed him, how much they liked him, etc. I think that comes from the FOMO phenomenon, for worse. Social media is a very narcissistic platform.

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How Social Media Wrote Its Eulogy for Philip Seymour Hoffman

How Social Media Wrote Its Eulogy for Philip Seymour Hoffman | Death and Social Media | Scoop.it
After the news that Philip Seymour Hoffman had died, social media began to shape its own narrative of what had happened.
Joseph Votaw's insight:

Social media in itself is a medium viable for creating art in ways unforeseeable until recently. And so in a way, thousands of tweets, videos, etc. on the internet combine to make a strange sort of e-collage, in this case, a eulogy for Phillip Seymour Hoffman.

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Death and Social Media: Facebook Friends For Life

Death and Social Media: Facebook Friends For Life | Death and Social Media | Scoop.it
It's been said too many times that social media is changing our relationships and degrading our ability to genuinely connect with others, but all those "superficial" interactions take on a unique s...
Joseph Votaw's insight:

Social media has drastically altered not only the way we view relationships with people, but death as well. I too recall learning of the death of an acquaintance via social media--it's a very surreal experience. The author makes a good point on how social media has strengthened interpersonal relationships by allowing us to check in on those we don't normally communicate with and keep them in our thoughts, even after they have passed on. 

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Hospital's Facebook 'likes' reflects its mortality rates, study finds

Hospital's Facebook 'likes' reflects its mortality rates, study finds | Death and Social Media | Scoop.it
If you’re trying to decide what hospital has the best record in terms of safety and patient satisfaction, you may want to check in first with Facebook
Joseph Votaw's insight:

This is an interesting example of Social Media's functionality outside of the internet. Does liking substitute as a rating system? In a way it harkens back to Myspace's old blogging platforms rating system--I forget what it was called specifically but you could either rate a post with one or two stars, similar to how a like could constitute as a singular rating.

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What Will the Future of Death on the Internet Look Like?

What Will the Future of Death on the Internet Look Like? | Death and Social Media | Scoop.it
When we shed this mortal coil, our digital footprint will remain. How do you want to be memorialized on the Web?
Joseph Votaw's insight:

This article mentions the distinct differences between remembering someone through memory and through their online activities. With the internet, when someone dies, you can read just about everything they've ever posted, commented, messaged, etc. It's one thing to remember a conversation with a person who has passed on, but to be able to recall exactly a textual conversation with them, typos and all, will alter the way we view death.

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Death of global web: Internet will end in 2014 - Kaspersky Lab

Death of global web: Internet will end in 2014 - Kaspersky Lab | Death and Social Media | Scoop.it
The Internet as a global network may cease to exist in 2014, giving way to dozens of national webs with limited access to foreign web resources, Alexander Gostev, an expert at the Kaspersky
Joseph Votaw's insight:

I had never thought of this before reading this article. Will the open, boundary-less internet give away to a series of smaller, closed off networks? It's very possible, and with the recent activities against net neutrality by monopoly driven broadband providers, it may happen soon.

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Roger Ebert's Death Inspires Mass Internet Mourning From Stars, Writers and Fans

Roger Ebert's Death Inspires Mass Internet Mourning From Stars, Writers and Fans | Death and Social Media | Scoop.it
The death of beloved film critic Roger Ebert on Thursday sparked an outpouring of grief that all but dominated social media.
Joseph Votaw's insight:

When it comes to celebrity deaths, Twitter seems to be the place to go to share condolences. Is the Twitter hashtag system going to replace the newspaper obituary page? This brings up other interesting questions. What happens to Roger Eberts twitter? Will the twitters of those who have passed remain dormant forever? Will twitter purge itself of inactive accounts at some point? Is there any merit, literary or otherwise, to his tweets? Would there be any reason to compile them into a book?

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The Most Vile and Racist Commenter Reactions to Mandela’s Death

The Most Vile and Racist Commenter Reactions to Mandela’s Death | Death and Social Media | Scoop.it
While reading various articles about the life and passing of Nelson Mandela, curiosity got the best of me and I perused various right-wing blogs. The majority of the comments at Town Hall, Glenn Beck's The Blaze and, of course, Breitbart.com were predictably awful.
Joseph Votaw's insight:

The internet is such a vast arena that the intelligence of the user varies greatly. for better or worse. I guess it only makes sense that not everyone has the same opinion of Nelson Mandela, but these comments show the lowest common denominator of human intelligence found on the internet. Commenting and social media allows us to share opinions globally, and allows even the most extremist of views to be viewed thousands of times.

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How the Social Web Reflected on Bin Laden's Death

How the Social Web Reflected on Bin Laden's Death | Death and Social Media | Scoop.it
What a difference 10 years make. In the past 24 hours, a resource we didn't even have a decade ago has become a primary medium — not only for finding out about important news bu...
Joseph Votaw's insight:

This is a great infographic/gallery explaining how big of a social media phenomenon the death of Bin Laden was. Since he was an enemy to so many in our country, it's interesting to see how much of a splash his death was on social media. What are other events that could cause such a spike in activity?

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Will Permanence Exist in the Digital Age?

Joseph Votaw's insight:

I found this article interesting, partly due to the fact that it was written in 2000, and the Digital Age isn't quite a mystery anymore. However it does relate to death in the fact that we have been taught that everything done online is permanent. This brings up several interesting ideas. Will I be able to read stupid tweets I wrote in high school when I'm 70 years old? Will my great great great grandchildren be able to read this? According to how we view information and data, unless some big changeover happens in how the internet works, my twitter account will theoretically live on forever, as will any obscure comments, pictures, videos, etc.--a pretty scary thought.

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Neknomination death: Irish teenager dies after taking part in social media craze

Neknomination death: Irish teenager dies after taking part in social media craze | Death and Social Media | Scoop.it
A Northern Ireland based social media page, which encourages users to post videos of themselves carrying out stunts while inebriated is to be discontinued after the death of an Irish teenager.
Joseph Votaw's insight:

This doesn't shine a light on anything grand about death and social media. What I find interesting is how a Facebook page about doing dangerous things while influenced by alcohol flip-flopped and became an alcohol-related danger awareness page. I can only imagine what went on on the page the days following this event

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How Social Media Is Changing The Way We Approach Death

How Social Media Is Changing The Way We Approach Death | Death and Social Media | Scoop.it
Death has long been taboo in an American culture that values youth, but an open conversation online can increase our enjoyment of life and understanding of its eventual end.
Joseph Votaw's insight:

How much does having access to the rest of the world in a social forum affect our brains and the way we understand life? Apparently a lot. This article discusses how for our generation, death will be a more public and more open topic than in any generation before us. Whether or not this ends up being the case, how we deal with death will ultimately be changed somewhat by the integration of social media into our everyday lives.

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