Dealing with ADHD in the Classroom
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Teaching Students with ADHD

Teaching Students with ADHD | Dealing with ADHD in the Classroom | Scoop.it
Dealing with ADHD in the classroom? These tips for teachers will help you overcome common challenges.
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While much of the information in this article is common knowledge, a few points stand out as being simple and practical ways to address the attention and participation problems of any student, not just those with ADD or ADHD. By seating students in front of the teachers desk, it gives them a very physical reminder that they should be paying attention or working diligently, even if the teacher is not sitting at their desk. Additionally, by helping the student create a simplistic organization system, clutter, stress, and frustration at lost or misplaced information or assignments is eliminated. 

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CHADD - Nationally recognized authority on ADHD > Support > Tips and Resources > Terms To Know

CHADD - Nationally recognized authority on ADHD > Support > Tips and Resources > Terms To Know | Dealing with ADHD in the Classroom | Scoop.it
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A few important terms to keep in mind when focusing on students with attention related learning challenges. 

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ADHD makes you different, not defective

ADHD makes you different, not defective | Dealing with ADHD in the Classroom | Scoop.it
A few days ago, I received an Instagram message from a young girl who has attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. She was struggling in school and depressed since being diagnosed. She shared her situation knowing I had found a way to live peacefull...
Alex Hursey's insight:

While much of this article is personal narration, one important point made in it is that students with ADD or ADHD need creative or engaging outlets outside of the classroom in order to be successful within it. Sports, theatre, music, clubs - anything that provides a positive outlet for the inevitable frustrations that come with attention issues helps to keep those frustrations out of class time. Students with ADD and ADHD need to be engaged in the classroom as much as any student, and just like any other student, they need something to focus on occasionally besides school work.  

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practically_speaking_adhd_in_the_classroom.pdf

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An interesting point made in this article is that one of the practical ways to handle a student with ADD or ADHD is to try and establish an instantaneous-consequence system for manifestations of disruptive behavioral problems. This is because children with ADD or ADHD have a hard time linking their behavior to its consequences when those consequences are delayed. Waiting for any amount of time (i.e. after-school detention or talking to the student after class) renders the consequence ineffective because the student no longer is able to associate it with their earlier actions. 

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The Classroom Experiment (Ep.1) - YouTube

Part two: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1iD6Zadhg4M In this two-part series, theory and practice meet head on as education expert Professor Dylan Wiliam set...
Alex Hursey's insight:

What struck me as one of the most practical ways to improve classroom participation is the idea of doing away with "hands up" questions. It's absolutely true that the students who sit at the front, feel confident, and are habitually engaged in the lesson are the ones that are raising their hands. The ones who struggle and feel less secure will never volunteer answers because they don't want to be wrong. By making participation optional, that is, by asking "who wants to answer and who does not", the students who struggle are allowed to opt out. Applying this to students with ADHD, expecting them to be able to engage on a moments notice by picking a random name to answer questions keeps them engaged. It also helps solidify the notion that even if the student's answer is wrong, the fact that they're attempting to answer is in and of itself a success. 

 

The frustrations the teachers have with the idea of picking a name at random could be worked out with patience and time as teachers break away from the "raise your hands" habit. 

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