De-extinction Pablo, Emma, Juanca and Eduardo.
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Efforts to Resuscitate Extinct Species May Spawn a New Era of the Hybrid: Scientific American

Efforts to Resuscitate Extinct Species May Spawn a New Era of the Hybrid: Scientific American | De-extinction Pablo, Emma, Juanca and Eduardo. | Scoop.it
What does de-extinction mean for biology and the environment?

Via SustainOurEarth, Daniel Avery Weisler
Eduardo Carriazo's insight:

I like this article because although it is long, it provides information about the topic. This includes quotes and examples. It is also good because it is like an "article of the week", so it will help you be trained for that.

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Rescooped by Eduardo Carriazo from Earth and Psyche
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Should We Be Trying to Bring Extinct Species Back to Life?

Should We Be Trying to Bring Extinct Species Back to Life? | De-extinction Pablo, Emma, Juanca and Eduardo. | Scoop.it
Here's a look at the greenwashing, guilt-tripping and the politics of “de-extinction.”

Via Cathie Bird
Eduardo Carriazo's insight:

What I like most about this article is that it says "It's not bringing a species back from the dead, It's building a new one". It's a good article because it has both pros and cons from the topic. It's also good that It's short and easy to read.

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Miranda Lievano's curator insight, May 13, 2014 1:31 PM

This is a good  article because it it includes a variety of reasons to support  there claim.  It also includes solutions to this controversial issue.  It is easy to understand. There are star statements and research support ideas.

 

Miranda Lievano's curator insight, May 13, 2014 1:35 PM

There is a new discoveriment that is called de-extincion, to some its great oportunity to see the amimals to others its buisness. To some people it is a chance that they can improve there way with animals but some are afraid that being "saved" is more like being "dead again"

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Bringing Extinct Species Back to Life - Pictures, More From National Geographic Magazine

Bringing Extinct Species Back to Life - Pictures, More From National Geographic Magazine | De-extinction Pablo, Emma, Juanca and Eduardo. | Scoop.it

The notion of bringing vanished species back to life—some call it de-extinction—has hovered at the boundary between reality and science fiction for more than two decades, ever since novelist Michael Crichton unleashed the dinosaurs of Jurassic Park on the world. For most of that time the science of de-extinction has lagged far behind the fantasy. Celia’s clone is the closest that anyone has gotten to true de-extinction. Since witnessing those fleeting minutes of the clone’s life, Fernández-Arias, now the head of the government of Aragon’s Hunting, Fishing and Wetlands department, has been waiting for the moment when science would finally catch up, and humans might gain the ability to bring back an animal they had driven extinct.

 

“We are at that moment,” he told me.


Via Olive Ventures, Daniel Avery Weisler, Eduardo Carriazo
Eduardo Carriazo's insight:

I picked this because it explains  why scientists want to bring back these animals.Also why they  vanished .How they are going to bring back the animals . 

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Eduardo Carriazo's curator insight, May 15, 2014 9:16 AM

This article explains the vanishing of animals.Also it explains that humans might  Gain the ability to bring back an animal that we have driven extinct.I recommend this article because it explains  why scientists want to do de extinction.

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Bringing Extinct Species Back to Life - Pictures, More From National Geographic Magazine

Bringing Extinct Species Back to Life - Pictures, More From National Geographic Magazine | De-extinction Pablo, Emma, Juanca and Eduardo. | Scoop.it

The notion of bringing vanished species back to life—some call it de-extinction—has hovered at the boundary between reality and science fiction for more than two decades, ever since novelist Michael Crichton unleashed the dinosaurs of Jurassic Park on the world. For most of that time the science of de-extinction has lagged far behind the fantasy. Celia’s clone is the closest that anyone has gotten to true de-extinction. Since witnessing those fleeting minutes of the clone’s life, Fernández-Arias, now the head of the government of Aragon’s Hunting, Fishing and Wetlands department, has been waiting for the moment when science would finally catch up, and humans might gain the ability to bring back an animal they had driven extinct.

 

“We are at that moment,” he told me.


Via Olive Ventures, Daniel Avery Weisler
Eduardo Carriazo's insight:

This article explains the vanishing of animals.Also it explains that humans might  Gain the ability to bring back an animal that we have driven extinct.I recommend this article because it explains  why scientists want to do de extinction.

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Eduardo Carriazo's curator insight, May 13, 2014 9:09 AM

I picked this because it explains  why scientists want to bring back these animals.Also why they  vanished .How they are going to bring back the animals . 

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Scientists are getting closer to resurrecting extinct species, so now is the time to talk about ‘de-extinction’ 

Scientists are getting closer to resurrecting extinct species, so now is the time to talk about ‘de-extinction’  | De-extinction Pablo, Emma, Juanca and Eduardo. | Scoop.it
Don’t expect something out of “Jurassic Park” to happen, but scientists and researchers say resurrecting extinct species, or “de-extinction,” could be possible, and it is time to involve the public.

Via Maria Nunzia @Varvera , Daniel Avery Weisler
Eduardo Carriazo's insight:

I chose this link because it has good information and made me think better about de- extinction. Before I didn't like de - extinction but now i want people that can get back animals from the past.

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De-extinction is about as sensible as de-death

De-extinction is about as sensible as de-death | De-extinction Pablo, Emma, Juanca and Eduardo. | Scoop.it
On Friday, March 15 in Washington DC, National Geographic and TEDx are hosting a day-long conference on species-revival science and ethics. In other words, they will be debating whether we can, and should… (De-extinction is as sensible as de-death.

Via Kruger Tours
Eduardo Carriazo's insight:

The author of this article is clearly opposed to de-extintion. This source is useful because it is short and it explains logic reasons why de-extinction is good for neither the world nor the new animals. It also has evidence, like the studies that the article cites.

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Miranda Lievano's curator insight, May 13, 2014 1:25 PM

This article talks about how de-extinction  is as realistic as de-death ( prevent death). In other words what he is saying is  that de-extinction is like creating zombies. This article is useful because  it talks about some really important points about de- extinction.  This article is for de-extinction.

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Stewart Brand: The dawn of de-extinction. Are you ready? | Video on TED.com

Throughout humankind's history, we've driven species after species extinct: the passenger pigeon, the Eastern cougar, the dodo ... But now, says Stewart Brand, we have the technology (and the biology) to bring back species that humanity wiped out.

Via Daniel Avery Weisler
Eduardo Carriazo's insight:

I picked this one because it asked questions that are vary important and the video shows you all the animals that they want to bring back .

also it shows want the animals do and why it is important to bring them back.

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For the first time, scientists have grown the embryos of an extinct species

For the first time, scientists have grown the embryos of an extinct species | De-extinction Pablo, Emma, Juanca and Eduardo. | Scoop.it
Just a few days ago, we were asking if de-extinction was possible, and today, we're a huge step closer to bringing recently extinct species back to life.

Via Roberto S L Naboni, Daniel Avery Weisler
Eduardo Carriazo's insight:

I chose this one beacause  it explains how bringing back this species is good for us. Also it explains How de extinction is done and why does it help the enviorment.in addition it goes into detail in the benefits of de extinction and how it can also help us save endangered species of animals.

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De-Extinction: Can Cloning Bring Extinct Species Back to Life?

De-Extinction: Can Cloning Bring Extinct Species Back to Life? | De-extinction Pablo, Emma, Juanca and Eduardo. | Scoop.it

At some point in the next decade, if advances in biotechnology continue on their current path, clones of extinct species such as the passenger pigeon, Tasmanian tiger and wooly mammoth could once again live among us. But cloning lost species—or “de-extinction” as some scientists call it—presents us with myriad ethical, legal and regulatory questions that must be answered, such as which (if any) species should be brought back and whether or not such creatures could be allowed to return to the wild. Such questions are set to be addressed at the TEDx DeExtinction conference, a day-long event in Washington, D.C., organized by Stewart Brand’s Revive & Restore project. Brand previewed the topics for discussion last week at the TED2013 conference in Long Beach, Calif.

 

Scientists are actively working on methods and procedures for bringing extinct species back to life, says Ryan Phelan, executive director of Revive & Restore and co-organizer of the TEDx event. “The technology is moving fast. What Stewart and I are trying to do with this meeting is for the first time to allow the public to start thinking about this. We’re going to hear from people who take it quite seriously. De-extinction is going to happen, and the questions are how does it get applied, when does it get used, what are the criteria which are going to be set?”

 

Cloning extinct species has been tried before—with moderate success. An extinct Pyrenean ibex, or bucardo, (Capra pyrenaica pyrenaica) was born to a surrogate mother goat in 2009, nine years after the last member of its species was killed by a falling tree. The cloned animal lived for just seven minutes. Revive & Restore itself has launched a project to try to resurrect the passenger pigeon, which went extinct in 1914.

 

More: http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2013/03/passenger-pigeon-de-extinction/


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Daniel Avery Weisler
Eduardo Carriazo's insight:

I chose this article because it has good information and if I was someone studying this I would use this source. I also choose this article because it changed my mind about de - extinction. If you can do it, you should do it.

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Peter Phillips's curator insight, March 15, 2013 4:28 PM

The release of the Monash University team's progress emplanting DNA from an extinct gastric brooder frog is an example of this... and also of how competetive research is... they decided to publish in a newspaper... traditionally a shortcut to fame when many people are about to discover the same thing. Good luck to all however, who work to maintain and reinstate the diversity of life on our planet, and congratulations for the dogged detective work!