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5 Warning Signs & Symptoms of H1N1

This video looks at 5 of the common signs and symptoms of the onset of H1N1 influenza, a strain that has been particularly active over the last few flu seaso...
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H1N1 Flu in Review: The HHS response

In the Spring of 2009, a new flu virus spread quickly across the United States and the world. The US government coordinated a public health emergency respons...
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H1N1 Influenza (Gripe porcina) (Swine Flu)

En este video, Ana Rivera, Asesor de Salud Publica para los CDC, describe la influenza o gripe porcina: sus signos y síntomas, cómo se transmite, los medicam...
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Barbados confirms one death among four cases of Swine Flu - Jamaica Observer

Barbados confirms one death among four cases of Swine Flu - Jamaica Observer | DClermontScience | Scoop.it
Barbados confirms one death among four cases of Swine Flu Jamaica Observer In addition, the Ministry of Health is expecting a shipment of the seasonal influenza vaccine which contains the H1N1 virus and will be offered to frontline workers in the...
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H1N1 Pandemic flu 2013/2014 virus outbreak returns - YouTube

It's back! Or perhaps it, the H1N1 Swine Flu, never left. What ever the case there is an ongoing outbreak taking place of the virus that killed more than 200...

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Poppen Report's curator insight, July 29, 2014 7:50 PM

THE PORK IS COMING! THE PORK IS COMING! WILL YOU TRUST YOUR LOCAL PIGS NOW AT THE MARKET,TO NOT MAKE YOU SICK?

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Symptoms of H1N1 (Swine Flu)

In this video, Dr. Joe Bresee, with CDC's Influenza Division, describes the symptoms of swine flu and warning signs to look for that indicate the need for ur...
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Swine influenza - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Swine influenza - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Swine influenza, also called pig influenza, swine flu, hog flu and pig flu, is an infection caused by any one of several types of swine influenza viruses. Swine influenza virus ( SIV) or swine-origin influenza virus ( S-OIV) is any strain of the influenza family of viruses that is endemic in pigs.

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SWINE FLU A, H1N1 - Bubblews

SWINE FLU A, H1N1 - Bubblews | DClermontScience | Scoop.it
Hi today I want to show you about the disease in the world
People in the world have been facing a lot of problems. Health problems are the most concer...
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The H1N1 Swine Flu: A Look Inside

http://www.discoverynews.com The H1N1 swine flu virus has become a pandemic. James Williams takes a look at where the swine flu originated and what happens t...
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It's a good video

 

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H1N1 discovered in marine mammals :: UC Davis News & Information

H1N1 discovered in marine mammals :: UC Davis News & Information | DClermontScience | Scoop.it
Scientists at the University of California, Davis, detected the H1N1 (2009) virus in free-ranging northern elephant seals off the central California coast a year after the human pandemic began,
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Wealthier areas got more H1N1 vaccine than poor, Minnesota finds - Minneapolis Star Tribune

Wealthier areas got more H1N1 vaccine than poor, Minnesota finds - Minneapolis Star Tribune | DClermontScience | Scoop.it
Minneapolis Star Tribune Wealthier areas got more H1N1 vaccine than poor, Minnesota finds Minneapolis Star Tribune H1N1 influenza spread indiscriminately among the rich and the poor during the flu pandemic of 2009, but a new Minnesota study shows...
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POSSIBLE "PANDEMIC!" H1N1 KILLING AGAIN!!

Please watch this entire video. Phil discusses the re-emergence of the deadly H1Ni virus! The CDC is on the verge of calling this a pandemic! See what Phil t...

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St Vincent confirms six cases of H1N1 but no need to panic says PM - Caribbean360.com

St Vincent confirms six cases of H1N1 but no need to panic says PM
Caribbean360.com
image Prime Minister Dr.
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'Humdinger': Swine flu virus which killed half-million modified to 'incurable' - RT

'Humdinger': Swine flu virus which killed half-million modified to 'incurable' - RT | DClermontScience | Scoop.it
RT 'Humdinger': Swine flu virus which killed half-million modified to 'incurable' RT At his level-3 biosafety lab at Wisconsin University's Institute for Influenza Virus Research in Madison, Kawaoka experimented with the H1N1 flu strain that was...
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The Flu - A Guide To The Influenza A Virus (Pandemic, Sickness, h1n1, swine flu, bird flu, Illness, Virus, Cold, Cough, Fever, Epidemic, Vaccine, Antiviral, Health) - Kindle edition by Kelly McGuir...

The Flu - A Guide To The Influenza A Virus (Pandemic, Sickness, h1n1, swine flu, bird flu, Illness, Virus, Cold, Cough, Fever, Epidemic, Vaccine, Antiviral, Health) - Kindle edition by Kelly McGuire.
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Social media as a scientific research tool

Social media as a scientific research tool | DClermontScience | Scoop.it

At the 2014 ScienceOnlineTogether conference, I will be moderating a session focusing on how to use social media as a scientific research tool (2:30 P.M. on Friday, February 28th in room 3).  The hashtag is #ScioResearch , so be sure to follow along, and I’ll make a Storify afterwards. This post is primarily intended to be a source of background information for participants in my session, though feel free to read, share and ask questions in the comments if you are not planning on participating in my session.

ScienceOnline community members understand the value of social media for collaborating with colleagues and communicating science to the public, but few think of the incredible resource that these tools are for scientific research. Hundreds of millions of people all over the world are constantly sharing their experiences and opinions in a format that is public, archived, searchable, and accessible, giving researchers access to this enormous dataset without the expense or logisitical difficulties involved in organizing a large-scale survey or series of focus groups. To use a technical term, for many types of scientific research, social media and “big data” is what is called “a freakin’ gold mine.”

 

Below are a few examples of how social media can be used for scientific research.

 

Public health: Social media can be used to track the spread of diseases, as well as public attitudes towards available treatments.  People use social media to share their personal experiences related to a disease (i.e. I was diagnosed with H1N1/ “swine flu”), which can allow researchers to track it’s spread. People also use social media to express their opinion towards treatments, valuable data which can allow us to refine public health policy. Bonus: this paper includes a flu-related joke that was popular on twitter during the time of H1n1.

Figure 4 from Chew and Eysenbach 2010, showing a correlation between the number of people tweeting about their experiences with H1N1 and the best available data on how common H1N1 was at the time

Public policy: Social media can monitor public attitudes towards government policies, and how they are shaped by breaking news events. For example, by analyzing the content of tweets about nuclear power made by U.S. residents in the days following the Fukushima nuclear disaster, researchers were able to determine how current events influence people’s perceptions of the risk associated with nuclear energy. They also studied what types of information spread most rapidly about this disaster.

Figure 1 from Binder et al. 2012., showing the number of tweets about nuclear power mentioning the associated risks over time.

Geology:  Social media can be used to track events such as earthquakes. When people experience a natural disaster like an earthquake, they are likely to tweet about it. An algorithm was developed to estimate the origin of the earthquake based on the frequency of tweets in different geographic areas, and it was remarkably similar to data generated by geologists.

Figure 9 from Sakaki et al. 2010, showing how close the actual earthquake center (red X) is to what was estimated by tweets (green crosses)

Economics: Social media can be used to predict economic trends. Studying the mood of twitter users on a given day can provide insight into the national mood, which is known to affect stock market trends.

Fisheries science (no paper yet, unpublished data from my own work). Many ocean stakeholders are active online communicators, including fishers and fisher advocacy organizations, scientists, conservation activists and NGOs. Comparing how they discuss conservation threats and proposed policy solutions can provide valuable insight into how we can effectively resolve these problems. For example, fisheries scientists and technical experts have proposed a series of 10 basic fisheries management policies to conserve and manage shark populations (outlined here). However, a content analysis of tweets by conservation activists shows a much higher focus on other policy solutions, differences which can have a major impact on what policies actually get enacted.

The right-most column is “any of the 10 solutions for sustainable fisheries management outlined in the International Plan of Action for Sharks”

In the session I’m moderating, we’ll discuss examples of social media being used for scientific research, as well as advantages and disadvantages of this tool and strategies for success. I hope to see many of you there!

 


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Deadly H1N1 Swine Flu Spreading Across U.S. again in 2014

Deadly H1N1 Swine Flu Spreading Across U.S. in 2014 Flu Shot.
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What is a pandemic? Is the current H1N1 swine flu outbreak a pandemic?

What is a pandemic? Some scientists say the 2009 H1N1 swine flu outbreak is already a pandemic, since it has become widespread. Others say the WHO should change its pandemic definition to excluse mild outbreaks.

Via Troy Mccomas (troy48)
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