day of the dead
3 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Jodi Giroux from Le Marche and Food
Scoop.it!

Fave dei Morti, tradition of the Day of the Dead

Fave dei Morti, tradition of the Day of the Dead | day of the dead | Scoop.it

Fave dei morti or Beans of the dead are sort of almond cookies, shaped like beans, flavored ground almonds, cinnamon and lemon juice.

Ingredients For 5 persons:

75 grams (about 2 1/2 ounces) almonds 60 grams (about 2 ounces) sugar or glucose 50 grams (about 1 2/3 ounces) of flour 1/2 tablespoon of cinnamon 30 grams (about 1 ounce) of butter a vial of lemon juice 1 egg 20 grams (about 2/3 of an ounce) of Italian baking powder for sweets (e.g. Paneangeli) 5 grams (about 1/5 of an ounce) vanillaEgg wash Egg white, beatenIngredienti (Original Italian text) Per 5 persone: 75g di mandorle 60g di zucchero o di glucosio 50g di farina 1/2 cucchiaio di cannella 30g di burro una fialetta (al limone) 1 uovo 1 chiara d'uovo 20 g di lievito baching 5 g vaniglia

 

Directions


Via Mariano Pallottini
more...
Mariano Pallottini's curator insight, October 21, 2013 11:56 AM

Bones of the dead or Beans of the dead, even today in some countries of Italy, on the night between 1 and 2 November, people respect the tradition leaving these cakes on dinner tables, sure to be visited by their dead. 

Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, October 21, 2013 4:53 PM

Fun food for the season!

Rescooped by Jodi Giroux from Grief & Bereavement Counseling
Scoop.it!

Day of the Dead tradition offers natural way to view death

Day of the Dead tradition offers natural way to view death | day of the dead | Scoop.it
A lesson from Mexico. The Day of the Dead exhibit at the National Museum of Mexican Art helps families explore the subject of death in a healthy, less fearful way.

Via American Institute Health Care Professionals
more...
American Institute Health Care Professionals's curator insight, October 31, 2013 12:52 PM

The Day of the Dead in Mexico in all reality ironically celebrates life.  It has an understanding that life exists after death and that we should honor the dead and their new existence.

It also makes others outside of the country focus more on death.  It forces, those of another culture, to re-think about their own existence and to examine their own existence.

Death is inevitable and it is time the American culture stop considering it a taboo subject but discuss it openly and honestly.  This is what Elisabeth Kubler Ross adovated years before and it is what needs to be done now.

If you are interested in taking courses in grief counseling or wish to become certified, then review our program.  In the meantime, feel free to browse around the blog and site.  If you have any questions, please let us know.