Data & Informatics
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Data & Informatics
The application and usage of data along with the interaction between people, organisations and technology
Curated by Stephen Dale
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How the Internet of Things Will Change Business

How the Internet of Things Will Change Business | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
Are companies ready for billions of everyday objects to join the Internet?

Via Paul Aneja - eTrends
Stephen Dale's insight:

As computers with wireless capability become cheap, it’s becoming affordable to connect more things to the Internet, like sensors in sewer pipes, factory machinery, lights, and home appliances.


Perhaps we should be asking ourselves..."what could possibly go wrong?"!

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Paul Aneja - eTrends's curator insight, July 18, 2014 3:24 PM

For last several years, technology industry is preparing for the Internet of things, a type of computing characterized by small, often dumb, usually unseen computers attached to objects. These devices sense and transmit data about the environment or offer new means of controlling it.


As computers with wireless capability become cheap, it’s becoming affordable to connect more things to the Internet, like sensors in sewer pipes, factory machinery, lights, and home appliances.


What are some new applications of Internet of Things, that you are looking to leverage in the next 3 years?

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The Future of Search May Not Be About Google: It's You In The End Who Will Decide

The Future of Search May Not Be About Google: It's You In The End Who Will Decide | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it
There is a evil side of Google which revealed itself in the Filter Bubble, invasion of privacy, the lack of transparency, in the monopoly induction of behavior and especially in what is happening in the search environment.

Via Robin Good
Stephen Dale's insight:

People who use Google are given the impression that they are interacting with the data out there, but they are actually interacting with Google and its view of the world.

 

"They are prediction engines that constantly refine a theory about who you are and what you are going to do or want next. Together, they create an universe of data for each one of us."

"In a 2010 paper published in the Scientific American journal, Tim Berners-Lee warned about companies developing ever more “closed” products and “data islands”.

"Morville, in his book Search Patterns, says that the first and second results receive 80% of attention. The vertical approach suggests to the user the idea of a single result that fully answers the question, enclosing possibilities and preventing alternative realization."


Or in other words, is our acceptance of what we see in search results eroding our ability (or willingness) to consider alternatives and employ critical thinking?

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Claude Terosier's curator insight, January 13, 2014 2:44 AM

"we should worry about search engines becoming the arbiters of truth." De l'importance de comprendre comment on accède à l'information et de reprendre la main.

Lucy Beaton's curator insight, January 16, 2014 8:21 PM

This is alarming.  We, as Teacher Librarians, need to be aware of the ramifications of this.

Mrs. Dilling's curator insight, February 13, 2014 11:52 AM

My favorite statement, "we must always be aware and well informed about the intentions of companies, and never stop having multiple options for any service."

 

This article was an eye opener for me. I had never questioned Google before.

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Algorithms: The Glue Between Content, Data and Insight

Algorithms: The Glue Between Content, Data and Insight | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good
Stephen Dale's insight:

"We are in the era of the algorithm. They decide what news we will see, they decide which person is important and they will even merge more and more into our non-digital lives.

 

But the biggest and realest danger lies in us. If we believe that there is only one truth and that is the one generated by a black-box algorithm we might be deceived easily."

 

A reminder, then, that algorithm's should not take the place of critical thinking.

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Robin Good's curator insight, March 24, 2014 2:25 PM


Lutz Finger, reports from SxSW on the topic of algorithms, curation and the future, as the skills of content creators, data analysts and code programmers are seemingly converging for the first time. 


Among others, he reports Steve Rosenbaum (founder of Magnify.net) significant own words at SxSW: "...a wise combination of human judgement enabled by algorithms will become the new king of content."


But while there are great new tools, startups and ideas leveraging the great potential of big data and human curation, there is a big, invisible danger, still looming on us.


"The danger is that any algorithm might fall prey to someone trying to influence it.

This might be the ones programming the algorithm or the users. We for instance saw governments trying to skew algorithms by introducing fake online personas (
Learn more about the US government persona-management software).
 

But the biggest and realest danger lies in us.

If we believe that there is only one truth and that is the one generated by a black-box algorithm we might be deceived easily."



Informative. Resourceful. 7/10



Full article: http://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20140320132545-6074593-the-age-of-the-algorithms-sxsw-summary 


See also: www.masternewmedia.org/future-of-search


Image: Bjoern Ognibeni - SxSW




Georges Millet's curator insight, March 25, 2014 4:10 AM

Knowledge & life turning today into a (google) search. Algorithms are key!  

Mariale Peñalosa Arguijo's curator insight, March 26, 2014 9:44 AM

 

 10
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Infographic: the Future of Big Data

Infographic: the Future of Big Data | Data & Informatics | Scoop.it

Big data is not new. It has existed for ages and can be attributed even to the initial years of computing. However, one might do well to consider why is there an increased buzz around this now.

The answer is quite simple: Significant advances that have been brought about by x86 hardware have actually helped in bringing computing power to the masses. However, with new technologies, cloud computing has extended this power. Now, users have extended perimeters, while still being able to control costs effectively...


Via Lauren Moss, Beth Kanter
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