Data Communication
12 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Tony Elkington from Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
Scoop.it!

Fiber cables made of air move data at 99.7 percent the speed of light | Ars Technica

Fiber cables made of air move data at 99.7 percent the speed of light | Ars Technica | Data Communication | Scoop.it

Researchers say they have created fiber cables that can move data at 99.7 percent of the speed of light, all but eliminating the latency plaguing standard fiber technology. There are still data loss problems to be overcome before the cables could be used over long distances, but the research may be an important step toward incredibly low-latency data transmissions.

 

Although optic fibers transmit information using beams of light, that information doesn't actually go at "light speed." The speed of light, about 300,000 km/s, is the speed light travels in a vacuum. In a medium such as glass, it goes about 30 percent slower, a mere 200,000 km/s.

 

"[L]ight propagates 31% slower in a silica glass fibre than in vacuum, thus compromising latency," notes a paper published Sunday in Nature Photonics, titled "Towards high-capacity fibre-optic communications at the speed of light in vacuum."

 

The research team from the University of Southampton in England solved this problem by taking the glass out of the glass fiber. This results in a "hollow-core photonic-bandgap fibre," which is made mostly of air yet still allows light to follow the path of the cable when it twists and turns.

 

The methods used by the researchers result in data loss of 3.5 dB/km, an impressively low number considering its incredibly low latency. However, that data loss is still too high for long-range communications. For now, these cables won't be used to wire up Internet Service Provider networks or for transatlantic cables.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tony Elkington
Scoop.it!

What is Data Communication?

What is Data Communication? | Data Communication | Scoop.it
Data communication refers to the exchange of data between two devices via some form of transmission medium.

Data communication is said to be local if communicating devices are in the same building or a similarly restricted geographical area.
more...
Sahir Naich's curator insight, November 17, 2015 1:58 AM
Share your insight
Scooped by Tony Elkington
Scoop.it!

Types of Transmission Media

Types of Transmission Media | Data Communication | Scoop.it
The
means through which data is transformed from one place to another is called
transmission or communication media. There are two categories of transmission
media used in computer communications.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tony Elkington
Scoop.it!

Signal Characteristics in Data Communication

Signal Characteristics in Data Communication | Data Communication | Scoop.it
A signal within a data communication system is any modulated electromagnetic wave (or digital pulse) over which data values are transmitted from one location to other in a network.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tony Elkington
Scoop.it!

TechBits 13 - Analog and Digital Signals

We interact with analog and digital signals everyday! This video explains what analog and digital signals are, how we use them, and how to convert between th...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Tony Elkington from Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
Scoop.it!

Provo will be 3rd U.S. metro area to get speedy Google Fiber | The Salt Lake Tribune

Provo will be 3rd U.S. metro area to get speedy Google Fiber | The Salt Lake Tribune | Data Communication | Scoop.it

 

Provo will be the third metropolitan area in the country to get the much-desired fiber-optic Internet network known as Google Fiber.

 

In an announcement Wednesday at the Utah Valley Convention Center, Mayor John Curtis and representatives of Google said they’ve reached an agreement in which the existing city-owned fiber-optic network known as iProvo would be sold to Google and turned into Google Fiber.

 

The Google Fiber network will offer residents up to a gigabit, or more than 1,000 megabits, per-second of Internet speeds (both download and upload) to their homes. That’s roughly 200 times faster than the lowest tier offered by Comcast’s cable modem service. With such Internet speeds, residents could easily play multiple streams of high-definition video on their computers or devices without a loss in speed. Businesses, government and schools in particular could benefit from the additional speeds for research and work.

 

"We think the future of the Internet will be built on gigabit speeds," said Kevin Lo, general manager for Google Fiber. "It’s a really exciting vision."

 

Unlike the Kansas City area and Austin, Texas, the other two markets that are getting Google Fiber, Google is not building the fiber-optic network from scratch but instead buying an existing system. Kansas City’s construction is under way, and Google announced Austin as the second city about a week ago.

 

The deal is a sigh of relief for Provo city officials, who have been mired in financial difficulties with iProvo since construction began in 2004 —issues similar to another municipally run fiber-optic network in northern Utah called UTOPIA.

 

"We’ve been able to realize the dream," Curtis said about the Google deal during an interview Tuesday. "It’s a very exciting moment for Provo."

 

The sale, which does not involve the exchange of money but rather of services, requires that Provo taxpayers pay off the original $39 million bond that was issued to construct iProvo. The deal is waiting final approval from Provo’s City Council, which will consider the proposal during its regular meeting Tuesday. Before then, residents will have a five-day period to weigh in at one of six scheduled public hearings on the matter.

 

Google’s Lo would not specify when the company would start selling the service in Provo but indicated it would be sometime this year. Google has not finalized what it will charge, although Lo said costs would be similar to those in Kansas City, where residents get a one-gigabit connection for $70 per month. The service also would offer small business-class pricing.

 

Click headline to read more--

 


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Tony Elkington from International Television, Broadband, Telecom and Broadcast Communications
Scoop.it!

Nvidia's newest Tegra chip is ready for faster LTE-Advanced networks - The Verge

Nvidia's newest Tegra chip is ready for faster LTE-Advanced networks - The Verge | Data Communication | Scoop.it
SlashGear Nvidia's newest Tegra chip is ready for faster LTE-Advanced networks The Verge The hardware is identical to the part shown off back at Mobile World Congress, but because it features a "software-defined modem," Nvidia simply applied an...

Via Vikram R Chari
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tony Elkington
Scoop.it!

What is Data Communication?

What is Data Communication? | Data Communication | Scoop.it
Data
communication is the transmission of electronic data over some media. The media
may be cables, microwaves. Elements
of Data Communication

            Four basic elements are needed for
any communication system.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tony Elkington
Scoop.it!

Emerging transmission technologies

Emerging transmission technologies | Data Communication | Scoop.it
In telecommunications, transmission is the process of sending, propagating and receiving an analog or digital information signal over a physical point-to-point or point-to-multipoint transmission medium, whether wired or wireless.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tony Elkington
Scoop.it!

HowStuffWorks "Analog and Digital Signals"

HowStuffWorks "Analog and Digital Signals" | Data Communication | Scoop.it
Does digital sound better than analog? It all depends on the way you record that sound. Take a look at analog vs. digital sound quality and technology.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tony Elkington
Scoop.it!

Through the Wires: Analog & Digital

Through the Wires: Analog & Digital | Data Communication | Scoop.it
In general, there are two types of telecommunication transmission--Analog transmission and Digital transmission.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tony Elkington
Scoop.it!

Multimode Fiber Provides Option for Microwave Data - Radio World

Multimode Fiber Provides Option for Microwave Data - Radio World | Data Communication | Scoop.it
Multimode Fiber Provides Option for Microwave Data
Radio World
I found some of my amateur radio friends who regularly use it as a transmission medium within large data infrastructures. As such, there is a lot of information on fiber-optics out there.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Tony Elkington from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

New World Record in Wireless Data Transmission - 40 Gbit/s at 250 GHz

New World Record in Wireless Data Transmission - 40 Gbit/s at 250 GHz | Data Communication | Scoop.it

Researchers of the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics and the Karlsruhe Institute for Technology have achieved the wireless transmission of 40 Gbit/s at 240 GHz over a distance of one kilometer. Their most recent demonstration sets a new world record and ties in seamlessly with the capacity of optical fiber transmission. In the future, such radio links will be able to close gaps in providing broadband internet by supplementing the network in rural areas and places which are difficult to access.

 

Digital, mobile and networked – changing media usage habits of modern society require the faster transmission of increasing vol-umes of data. Compared to the European standard, Germany lags behind in the expansion of the fiber-optic network, according to statistics from the FTTH Council Europe. Deploying new fiber-optic cables is expensive and difficult when there are natural or urban obstacles such as rivers or traffic junctions. Broadband radio links can help to overcome such critical areas, thereby facilitating the expansion of the network infrastructures. In rural areas they can be a cost-effective and flexible alternative to “Fiber to the Home”.

 

Researchers have now set a new world record in wireless data transmission: For the first time, fully integrated electronic transmit-ters and receivers have been developed for a frequency of 240 GHz, which allows the transmission of data rates of up to 40 Gbit/s. This equals the transmission of a complete DVD in under a second or 2400 DSL16000 internet connections. Distances of over one kilometer have already been covered by using a long range demonstrator, which the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology set up between two skyscrapers as part of the project “Millilink”. “We have managed to develop a radio link based on active electronic circuits, which enables similarly high data rates as in fiber-optic systems, therefore allowing seamless integration of the radio link”, says Prof. Ingmar Kallfass, who coordinated the project at Fraunhofer IAF within the scope of a Shared Professorship between IAF and KIT. Since 2013, Kallfass is with the University of Stuttgart, where he continues to lead the project.

 

Using the high frequency range between 200 and 280 GHz not only enables the fast transmission of large volumes of data, but also results in very compact technical assembly. Since the size of elec-tronic circuits and antennae scales with frequency / wavelength, the transmitter and receiver chip only measures 4 x 1.5 mm⊃2;. The semi-conductor technology developed at Fraunhofer IAF, based on tran-sistors with high carrier mobility (HEMT), makes it possible to use the frequency between 200 and 280 GHz with active transmitters and receivers in the form of compact, integrated circuits. The at-mosphere shows low attenuation in this frequency range, which enables broadband directional radio links. “This makes our radio link easier to install compared to free-space optical systems for data transmission. It also shows better robustness in poor weather condi-tions such as fog or rain”, explains Jochen Antes of KIT.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.