Pro-Tools Vs Logic
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Home VS Professional Recording Studio: The Difference?

That depends – NOT on the SIZE of your TOYS… but rather the DEPTH of your SKILLS. Never before has evolving digital recording equipment – smaller, faster, cheaper, better – allowed you to so easily turn your laptop into a full studio, which record bosses only dreamt of... http://mixingmastering.co.uk/home-vs-professional-recording-studio-the-difference/


Via MixingMastering-co-uk
JAYLEW's insight:

This article is a good read, it goes into why the person behind the gear is the real studio. I like how the author states right away that it doesn't matter what equipment you have or where you record, it is really up to do you know what your are doing with this equipment. It talks about the various stages of mixing and how they help out with the different settings you may be in. Basically the article is giving you a guide to what you need to know and should have available when not using a professional studio.

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Recording: Can Award-Winning Recordings Be Made In A Home Studio? - Pro Sound Web

Recording: Can Award-Winning Recordings Be Made In A Home Studio? - Pro Sound Web | Pro-Tools Vs Logic | Scoop.it
A reasoned perspective plus thoughts from recording engineers Ed Cherney, George Massenburg and David Hewitt
JAYLEW's insight:

This was a great article. it discussed how the transition from recording studios to In Home studios has been a process for a long time. Going from producing or coming up with ideas in a home or personal studio to a professional one has been a process that has always been present. When talking about how the industry is now and getting isight from real engineers helped prove the point that personal or professional studios will always be around and they go hand in hand.

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Recording: Home VS. Studio | Delicious Audio

Recording: Home VS. Studio | Delicious Audio | Pro-Tools Vs Logic | Scoop.it
JAYLEW's insight:

The article goes in depth on the way recording had progressed from the days of Motown to today. From using professional grade equipment inside a home,church or hotel to using a professional studio with its equipment all the points made were relative to how recording differed from each. It went into the cost of equipment and time using it to using basic equipment and perspectives on your own process. Going over how different settings and locations can help out a recording like catching outward sounds from your place while recording at home or near a place with sounds coming from life like a plan flying by when your where talking about it. In all this is a great source of information on the difference between the two studios.

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Zack Seavey's curator insight, February 12, 2014 2:57 PM

I have to agree with this article some what. I would love to have a home studio only if I had the money to spend on a really nice one. If I don't then there are problems like feeling inspired at 3 or 4 am and my neighbors are sleeping. Then the noise from out side will cause a problem as well. Pros- You can record. Cons- you get the cops called on you and can't pay the fine if you get one cause you spent it on a cheap home studio.

Fletcher Moses's curator insight, September 11, 2014 11:09 PM

This description gets into a very broad details about the differences between a project studio and a professional studio. The author includes the sound proofing differences, good acoustics and critical listening. Any thing from the room to the recording can be a big difference in a song

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Audio Production Studios in the US Industry Market Research Report from IBISWorld has Been Updated

Los Angeles, CA (PRWEB) August 19, 2013 The advent of the internet sparked a massive structural change in how media is consumed, distributed and recorded, drastically affecting the Audio Production Studios industry.
JAYLEW's insight:

The bases of this article was to give insight on how the internet changed the way people and companies do music today. It went into details on why and how the internet changed the way music is done and the impact it has  for music and the way its being made and processed today. This is a great read to gain knowledge on what the intent has done for music.

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Zack Seavey's curator insight, February 12, 2014 3:12 PM

I find this article credible because it worked with a few businesses to get the numbers on how much sales have declined. I agree with the fact that record sales have gone down, but the sale of music equipment has gone up. Then the years of experience of a mix and master engineer you have at a label cant be matched at home. Pros- invest in home recording equipment and get the experience. Cons- Don't go toward records for putting music out. Well don't put out a bunch of records.

Sonnata Pembroke's curator insight, September 15, 12:07 PM
1. This article came off a little biased towards home studios. While addressing that home studios are on a rise, the author took the stance that home studios will not be as professional. This article addressed the internet as if its a problem, because people are allowed to stream their own music without a professional.
2. This article seems very biased. They address how professional studios expertise will always be needed, but there are underground people better than professionals.
3. I don't feel as if this source was very informative for a professional. It could've included more of the facts.
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Could home recording doom professional music studios?

Could home recording doom professional music studios? | Pro-Tools Vs Logic | Scoop.it
Inexpensive home recording equipment helps artists rise from outside the mainstream labels.
JAYLEW's insight:

This article was good with the information on why a home studio and a professional studio are similar more today then ever. Mark Guarino hits a lot of great pints on how music is now done more with just a simple laptop, microphone and midi controller, which is what is seen more commonly today. He hits on topics about how music sales are going down but the rise of D.A.W.S and electronic music are being more prominent and how mainstream studios like Hit Factory and others from around the world are either closed or not a necessity as it was back then.

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Sonnata Pembroke's curator insight, September 15, 10:05 AM
1. Home studios can put many professional studios out of business, because we are able to do everything from home on our laptops. Engineering is a craft, that anyone can learn and while it's been viewed as something only professionals can do, home studios are changing that.
2. The author included a great deal of information. From beginning with listing states with major recording studios, to naming some softwares used for recording, mixing, and mastering. Music sales may be on decline, but sales of music hardware are on a steady increase.
3. I consider this source reliable, because there's facts to back up every statement made.
Clea Carpenter's curator insight, September 20, 1:20 PM
The Information in this article was awesome! Mark Guarino informs the readers on professional studios vs. home studios and their similarities. But also how professional studios are becoming a lesser thing vs. home studios that are more becoming these days.
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Home VS Professional Recording Studio: The Difference?

That depends – NOT on the SIZE of your TOYS… but rather the DEPTH of your SKILLS. Never before has evolving digital recording equipment – smaller, faster, cheaper, better – allowed you to so easily turn your laptop into a full studio, which record bosses only dreamt of... http://mixingmastering.co.uk/home-vs-professional-recording-studio-the-difference/


Via MixingMastering-co-uk
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JAYLEW's curator insight, August 17, 2014 3:53 PM

This article is a good read, it goes into why the person behind the gear is the real studio. I like how the author states right away that it doesn't matter what equipment you have or where you record, it is really up to do you know what your are doing with this equipment. It talks about the various stages of mixing and how they help out with the different settings you may be in. Basically the article is giving you a guide to what you need to know and should have available when not using a professional studio.