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Introduction to Complexity Complexity, SFI's MOOC

Introduction to Complexity Complexity, SFI's MOOC | CxAnnouncements | Scoop.it

Enrollment for Introduction to Complexity will be available on September 30, 2013, at which time the course will begin and the course materials will be available. You may enroll at any time during the course (September 30 - December 13, 2013). 

 

http://www.complexityexplorer.org

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CxAnnouncements
General announcements for the complexity community
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Network Theory Faculty position at UC Davis

The University of California, Davis invites applications for a faculty position in network theory, which is an interdisciplinary academic field using graph theory, statistical mechanics, and applied mathematics to elucidate the mathematical foundations underlying the organization and function of networks across a wide range of applied disciplines. The appointment will be at the Assistant or Associate Professor level, with opportunity for a more senior level appointment for an exceptional candidate, with an intended start date of Fall 2018. The appointment will reside in the Department of Computer Science or the Department of Physics, with the ideal candidate qualified to hold a joint appointment based in both departments. To ensure full consideration, applications must be submitted by December 15th, 2017.
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Open research position at ISTC in collaboration with the LABSS

A post-doctoral position is now opening at the ISTC-CNR, in collaboration with the Laboratory of Agent Based Social Simulation (LABSS). The position is promoted in memory of Rosaria Conte, Research Director and founder of the LABSS, to foster research following the directions that Rosaria contributed to develop, especially in the field of social and cognitive dynamics. The fellowship is intended as a way to continue developing Rosaria Conte’s work and ideas, reflecting her many inter-disciplinary interests alongside her commitment and enthusiasm for mentoring younger researchers.
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Call for Postdoctoral position in Data Science at Central European University

Call for Postdoctoral position in Data Science at Central European University | CxAnnouncements | Scoop.it
The Intellectual Theme Initiative “Just data” at Central European University is looking for an exceptional candidate to fill one open postdoctoral position in data science, broadly defined.

The research will be conducted with the research group directed by Prof. Roberta Sinatra and Prof. Michael Szell, with unique opportunities for collaborations with other excellent faculty at Central European University. The group currently focuses on quantitative projects at the boundary of computational social science and network science, including science of science, social dynamics, urban sustainability, data visualization, and fundamental questions in complex systems.

We welcome applicants with strong background in fields including statistical physics, applied mathematics, machine learning, artificial intelligence, social network analysis, complex systems, or other closely related fields. Our priority is to attract technically strong researchers who are interested in asking bold, new questions with data. A stated passion in data analysis is a must; excellent organizational and interpersonal skills are essential. The applicant will conduct research using large data sets, and be involved in the development of interactive data visualization tools.
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The 2017 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

The 2017 Nobel Prize in Chemistry | CxAnnouncements | Scoop.it
We may soon have detailed images of life’s complex machineries in atomic resolution. The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2017 is awarded to Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson for the development of cryo-electron microscopy, which both simplifies and improves the imaging of biomolecules. This method has moved biochemistry into a new era.

A picture is a key to understanding. Scientific breakthroughs often build upon the successful visualisation of objects invisible to the human eye. However, biochemical maps have long been filled with blank spaces because the available technology has had difficulty generating images of much of life’s molecular machinery. Cryo-electron microscopy changes all of this. Researchers can now freeze biomolecules mid-movement and visualise processes they have never previously seen, which is decisive for both the basic understanding of life’s chemistry and for the development of pharmaceuticals.

Electron microscopes were long believed to only be suitable for imaging dead matter, because the powerful electron beam destroys biological material. But in 1990, Richard Henderson succeeded in using an electron microscope to generate a three-dimensional image of a protein at atomic resolution. This breakthrough proved the technology’s potential.

Joachim Frank made the technology generally applicable. Between 1975 and 1986 he developed an image processing method in which the electron microscope’s fuzzy twodimensional images are analysed and merged to reveal a sharp three-dimensional structure.

Jacques Dubochet added water to electron microscopy. Liquid water evaporates in the electron microscope’s vacuum, which makes the biomolecules collapse. In the early 1980s, Dubochet succeeded in vitrifying water – he cooled water so rapidly that it solidified in its liquid form around a biological sample, allowing the biomolecules to retain their natural shape even in a vacuum.

Following these discoveries, the electron microscope’s every nut and bolt have been optimised. The desired atomic resolution was reached in 2013, and researchers can now routinely produce three-dimensional structures of biomolecules. In the past few years, scientific literature has been filled with images of everything from proteins that cause antibiotic resistance, to the surface of the Zika virus. Biochemistry is now facing an explosive development and is all set for an exciting future.
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The 2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

The 2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine | CxAnnouncements | Scoop.it
Life on Earth is adapted to the rotation of our planet. For many years we have known that living organisms, including humans, have an internal, biological clock that helps them anticipate and adapt to the regular rhythm of the day. But how does this clock actually work? Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael W. Young were able to peek inside our biological clock and elucidate its inner workings. Their discoveries explain how plants, animals and humans adapt their biological rhythm so that it is synchronized with the Earth's revolutions.

Using fruit flies as a model organism, this year's Nobel laureates isolated a gene that controls the normal daily biological rhythm. They showed that this gene encodes a protein that accumulates in the cell during the night, and is then degraded during the day. Subsequently, they identified additional protein components of this machinery, exposing the mechanism governing the self-sustaining clockwork inside the cell. We now recognize that biological clocks function by the same principles in cells of other multicellular organisms, including humans.

With exquisite precision, our inner clock adapts our physiology to the dramatically different phases of the day. The clock regulates critical functions such as behavior, hormone levels, sleep, body temperature and metabolism. Our wellbeing is affected when there is a temporary mismatch between our external environment and this internal biological clock, for example when we travel across several time zones and experience "jet lag". There are also indications that chronic misalignment between our lifestyle and the rhythm dictated by our inner timekeeper is associated with increased risk for various diseases.
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Live Tweetcast of CCS'17: The Conference on Complex Systems 2017

Live Tweetcast of CCS'17: The Conference on Complex Systems 2017 | CxAnnouncements | Scoop.it

September 17-22

Cancun, Mexico

 

Follow the CCS'17 action with the hashtag #CCS17 and through @ccs17mx.

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ITMO University Professorship Program

This program is aimed at strengthening the internationalization of the educational experience for scholars, students and the University.

Professorship extends to a variety of fields (link to chairs) and is open to highly qualified professionals who hold a doctorate degree and are affiliated with World’s Top Universities.

From lecturing the curriculum of double degree programs to presenting short-term courses, there’s variety of opportunities to contribute to topical expertise and cutting-edge teaching methods.

International professors can expect a student-oriented learning environment with an emphasis on real-world, global experience. They will also enjoy personal attention of ITMO University’s Foreign Students and Scholars Office that not only will help professors and their families to smoothly relocate, but also make the best out of their time in St. Petersburg.
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Entropy Special Issue "Information Decomposition of Target Effects from Multi-Source Interactions"

Entropy Special Issue "Information Decomposition of Target Effects from Multi-Source Interactions" | CxAnnouncements | Scoop.it
Shannon information theory has provided rigorous ways to capture our intuitive notions regarding uncertainty and information, and made an enormous impact in doing so. One of the fundamental measures here is mutual information, which captures the average information contained in one variable about another, and vice versa. If we have two source variables and a target, for example, we can measure the information held by one source about the target, the information held by the other source about the target, and the information held by those sources together about the target. Any other notion about the directed information relationship between these variables, which can be captured by classical information-theoretic measures (e.g., conditional mutual information terms) is linearly redundant with those three quantities.

However, intuitively, there is strong desire to measure further notions of how this directed information interaction may be decomposed, e.g., how much information the two source variables hold redundantly about the target, how much each source variable holds uniquely, and how much information can only be discerned by synergistically examining the two sources together. These notions go beyond the traditional information-theoretic view of a channel serving the purpose of reliable communication, considering now the situation of multiple communication streams converging on a single target. This is a common situation in biology, and in particular in neuroscience, where, say, the ability of a target to synergistically fuse multiple information sources in a non-trivial fashion is likely to have its own intrinsic value, independently of reliability of communication.

The absence of measures for such decompositions into redundant, unique and synergistic information is arguably the most fundamental missing piece in classical information theory. Triggered by the formulation of the Partial Information Decomposition framework by Williams and Beer in 2010, the past few years have witnessed a concentration of work by the community in proposing, contrasting, and investigating new measures to capture these notions of information decomposition. Other theoretical developments consider how these measures relate to concepts of information processing in terms of storage, transfer and modification. Meanwhile, computational neuroscience has emerged as a primary application area due to significant interest in questions surrounding how target neurons integrate information from large numbers of sources, as well as the availability of data sets to investigate these questions on.

This Special Issue seeks to bring together these efforts, to capture a snapshot of the current research, as well as to provide impetus for and focused scrutiny on newer work. We also seek to present progress to the wider community and attract further research. We welcome research articles proposing new measures or pointing out future directions, review articles on existing approaches, commentary on properties and limitations of such approaches, philosophical contributions on how such measures may be used or interpreted, applications to empirical data (e.g., neural imaging data), and more.

Dr. Joseph Lizier
Dr. Nils Bertschinger
Prof. Michael Wibral
Prof. Juergen Jost
Guest Editors
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Announcing Unpaywall: unlocking #openaccess versions of paywalled research articles as you browse

Announcing Unpaywall: unlocking #openaccess versions of paywalled research articles as you browse | CxAnnouncements | Scoop.it

Today we’re launching a new tool to help people read research literature, instead of getting stuck behind paywalls. It’s an extension for Chrome and Firefox that links you to free full-text as you browse research articles. Hit a paywall? No problem: click the green tab and read it free!

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Postdoctoral position in Big Data and Data Science

We are looking for a highly motivated postdoctoral fellow in the area of Big Data and Data Science with a particular focus on Social Mining within a EU funded project. The project aims to establish a Social Mining and Big Data Ecosystem for ethically sensitive scientific discoveries and advanced applications of social data mining to the various dimensions of social life.
The ideal candidate shall pursue exciting research in the areas of Big Data, social data analytics, machine learning, large-scale networks, deep learning, participatory smart cities platforms, and/or in connection with the Nervousnet.info platform.
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Motter Group Postdoctoral Positions

The group has openings for postdoctoral researchers interested in dynamical aspects of complex network systems. The main topics of interest include: dynamics of ecological, chemical, and power-grid networks; applications of control theory and game theory to complex systems; missing information in biochemical and combustion reaction networks; cascades, synchronization, and consensus phenomena; implications of symmetry in network structure and dynamics; applications to sustainability, climate, and energy problems. Ideal candidates will be recent PhD’s in physics, applied mathematics, engineering, computer science, statistics, or related fields. One position is available immediately.  To apply, candidates should e-mail a CV and a brief research statement to Prof. Motter at motter@northwestern.edu . The CV should include a list of publications and contact information of at least two references who can provide recommendation letters. Deadline for applications: March 1, 2017.  For more information on the research in the group, please visit: http://dyn.phys.northwestern.edu
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University of Sydney - Postdoctoral Research Associate in Complex Systems

Two positions in:

(1) large-scale computational modelling of epidemics,

(2) simulation, modelling and analysis of housing market risks

 

  • Research focussed on focussed on studying nonlinear critical phenomena in technological, social, organisational, and biological systems
  • Join a research group of international reputation and contribute to developing and presenting new and innovative ideas
  • Full-time 2.5-year fixed term, (flexible part time options are possible) remuneration package: $104K p.a. which includes leave loading and up to 17% super)
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Assistant/Associate/Full Professor in the Network Science Institute

Assistant/Associate/Full Professor in the Network Science Institute | CxAnnouncements | Scoop.it
The Network Science Institute (NetSI) is a multi-disciplinary research community supporting innovative research and training in network science. The successful candidate will join an outstanding interdisciplinary community represented by 10 core faculty members representing 7 departments, including Physics, Computer science, Political Science, Business, Health Science, Communications, and Mathematics. 

The successful candidate will be offered a departmental tenure home commensurate with their expertise. NetSI is dedicated to creating synergy among faculty expertise, across departments and colleges, with shared computing infrastructure, active lecture series and vibrant collaborative research opportunities. Candidates’ are expected to actively engage our distinctive interdisciplinary, collaborative culture. Candidate’s research plans should extend beyond their home discipline to engage with other fields in other domains of network sciences. Substantive foci are open and broad, including network structure and dynamics, spreading and diffusion, relational and clustered modeling, automated mining of qualitative data, theoretical physics and computational models of social processes, and computationally intensive data collection and analysis. 
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Jobs: SFI Program Postdoc, Neural Network Models of Social Organizations | Santa Fe Institute

Jobs: SFI Program Postdoc, Neural Network Models of Social Organizations | Santa Fe Institute | CxAnnouncements | Scoop.it
SFI seeks a program postdoc to play a key role in a project using modern information theory and numerical optimization techniques to analyze social organizations, ranging from modern firms to military organizations to complex chiefdoms to primary states. 
 
The starting point for the project is to identify the "organization'' of a social group as the communication network(s) within that group. To begin we will adopt a group-selection perspective, assuming that the social group's network structure is (approximately) optimal, given the information-processing limitations of the agents within the social group, and the exogenous welfare function of the overall group. We intend to leverage the computational power of neural networks to solve such problems. An expanded description of this project can be found at https://arxiv.org/abs/1702.04449

This project, led by the Santa Fe Institute, is collaboration among archaeologists, economists, and computer scientists. The ideal starting date is the spring of 2018, though that is flexible. The position would last for two years, with possible extensions. 
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Interdisciplinary Training in Complex Networks and Systems

Understanding complex networked systems is key to solving some of the most vexing problems confronting humankind, from discovering how dynamic brain connections give rise to thoughts and behaviors, to detecting and preventing the spread of misinformation or unhealthy behaviors across a population. Graduate training, however, typically occurs in one of two dimensions: experimental and observational methods in a specific area such as biology and sociology, or in general methodologies such as machine learning and data science.

With more and more students seeking to gain sufficient expertise in mathematical and computational methods on top of domain-specific laboratory and social analysis methodologies, a greater demand for more efficient training is emerging. This National Science Foundation Research Traineeship (NRT) award to Indiana University will address this growing need with an integrated dual PhD program that trains students to be "bidisciplinary" in Complex Networks and Systems (CNS) and another discipline of their choosing from the natural and social sciences. It will seamlessly integrate traditional education with interdisciplinary hands-on research in a culture of academic and human diversity.

 

Applications Due December 1

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The Prize in Economic Sciences 2017

Richard H. Thaler has incorporated psychologically realistic assumptions into analyses of economic decision-making. By exploring the consequences of limited rationality, social preferences, and lack of self-control, he has shown how these human traits systematically affect individual decisions as well as market outcomes.

Limited rationality: Thaler developed the theory of mental accounting, explaining how people simplify financial decision-making by creating separate accounts in their minds, focusing on the narrow impact of each individual decision rather than its overall effect. He also showed how aversion to losses can explain why people value the same item more highly when they own it than when they don't, a phenomenon called the endowment effect. Thaler was one of the founders of the field of behavioural finance, which studies how cognitive limitations influence financial markets.

Social preferences: Thaler's theoretical and experimental research on fairness has been influential. He showed how consumers' fairness concerns may stop firms from raising prices in periods of high demand, but not in times of rising costs. Thaler and his colleagues devised the dictator game, an experimental tool that has been used in numerous studies to measure attitudes to fairness in different groups of people around the world.

Lack of self-control: Thaler has also shed new light on the old observation that New Year's resolutions can be hard to keep. He showed how to analyse self-control problems using a planner-doer model, which is similar to the frameworks psychologists and neuroscientists now use to describe the internal tension between long-term planning and short-term doing. Succumbing to shortterm temptation is an important reason why our plans to save for old age, or make healthier lifestyle choices, often fail. In his applied work, Thaler demonstrated how nudging – a term he coined – may help people exercise better self-control when saving for a pension, as well in other contexts.

In total, Richard Thaler's contributions have built a bridge between the economic and psychological analyses of individual decision-making. His empirical findings and theoretical insights have been instrumental in creating the new and rapidly expanding field of behavioural economics, which has had a profound impact on many areas of economic research and policy.
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The 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics

The 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics | CxAnnouncements | Scoop.it
On 14 September 2015, the universe's gravitational waves were observed for the very first time. The waves, which were predicted by Albert Einstein a hundred years ago, came from a collision between two black holes. It took 1.3 billion years for the waves to arrive at the LIGO detector in the USA.

The signal was extremely weak when it reached Earth, but is already promising a revolution in astrophysics. Gravitational waves are an entirely new way of observing the most violent events in space and testing the limits of our knowledge.

LIGO, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory, is a collaborative project with over one thousand researchers from more than twenty countries. Together, they have realised a vision that is almost fifty years old. The 2017 Nobel Laureates have, with their enthusiasm and determination, each been invaluable to the success of LIGO. Pioneers Rainer Weiss and Kip S. Thorne, together with Barry C. Barish, the scientist and leader who brought the project to completion, ensured that four decades of effort led to gravitational waves finally being observed.

In the mid-1970s, Rainer Weiss had already analysed possible sources of background noise that would disturb measurements, and had also designed a detector, a laser-based interferometer, which would overcome this noise. Early on, both Kip Thorne and Rainer Weiss were firmly convinced that gravitational waves could be detected and bring about a revolution in our knowledge of the universe.

Gravitational waves spread at the speed of light, filling the universe, as Albert Einstein described in his general theory of relativity. They are always created when a mass accelerates, like when an ice-skater pirouettes or a pair of black holes rotate around each other. Einstein was convinced it would never be possible to measure them. The LIGO project's achievement was using a pair of gigantic laser interferometers to measure a change thousands of times smaller than an atomic nucleus, as the gravitational wave passed the Earth.

So far all sorts of electromagnetic radiation and particles, such as cosmic rays or neutrinos, have been used to explore the universe. However, gravitational waves are direct testimony to disruptions in spacetime itself. This is something completely new and different, opening up unseen worlds. A wealth of discoveries awaits those who succeed in capturing the waves and interpreting their message.
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Postdoctoral Position in Network Dynamics at Northwestern University

The group of Prof. Adilson E. Motter at Northwestern University has an opening for postdoctoral researchers interested in dynamical aspects of complex network systems. To apply, candidates should e-mail a CV and a brief research statement to Prof. Motter at motter@northwestern.edu. The application deadline is November 15, 2017. For more information, please visit: http://dyn.phys.northwestern.edu.

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YRNCS Job Fair at CCS'17

Have you got an open position in your group that you’d like to advertise? Are you a young researcher looking for career opportunities?

The YRNCS Job Fair will provide PhD students and early career researchers with a great opportunity to find out about open positions during CCS 2017. It will take place during the Welcome Cocktail reception on Monday 18th September from 7pm onwards, and flyers and posters to advertise the positions will be visible all week. The Job Fair will offer a great chance to meet potential employers and employees, or even just to mingle and make new contacts!

If you’d like to advertise a position, send a one-page flyer at f.botta@warwick.ac.uk

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ITMO University Fellowship Program

ITMO University Fellowship program aims to provide outstanding researchers and scientists, who are, or have the potential to become, leaders in their chosen fields, with the opportunity to build an independent research career. Our intention is to help to develop next generation of researchers with the greatest potential in their postdoctoral and early career stages.
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Binghamton University Job Posting: George J. Klir Endowed Professor Systems Science

The Thomas J. Watson School of Engineering and Applied Science at Binghamton University is seeking nominations and applications for the George J. Klir Endowed Professor in Systems Science position. This is a newly-created position made possible by a gift to honor the memory and work of the late George J. Klir, a Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Systems Science at Binghamton University.
The candidate should demonstrate leading academic fortitude in the fields inspired by Dr. Klir's work including, but not limited to: complex systems; artificial intelligence; fuzzy set theory, fuzzy logic and fuzzy systems; general systems concepts and theory; generalized information theory; probabilistic and possibilistic theory; soft computing; systems problem solving; uncertainty theory; and fields and disciplines that develop from this work. The position will carry the rank of full professor in the Department of Systems Science and Industrial Engineering, Thomas J. Watson School of Engineering and Applied Science.

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Postdoctoral Researcher in the area of blockchain technology

We are looking for a Postdoctoral Researcher in the area of blockchain technology with a particular focus on applications in the fields of IoT and marketplaces for digital currencies.
The ideal candidate shall pursue exciting research & development in systems, blockchain, decentralized networks and IoT and some of the following areas like cryptocurrencies, financial markets, the sharing economy and digital marketplaces. The work will be performed within the European project "FuturICT 2.0“, which explores the future of digital societies and markets over the coming three years. During this period, we will build a pilot application and aim at integrating it with the nervousnet.

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University of Sydney - Postdoctoral Research Associate - Student Interactions

The Postdoctoral Research Associate will conduct a longitudinal and a cross-sectional analysis of large-scale data of student interactions. The primary purpose of the network analysis is to cast light on the social and cultural landscape of the Universitys student body. The results will inform the targeting of network interventions.

The successful person will work closely with Dr. Petr Matous, Prof Philippa Pattison (Deputy Vice-Chancellor for Education), and Prof. Shane Houston (Deputy Vice-Chancellor for Indigenous Strategy and Services).

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Postdoctoral Fellowships at UNAM

Postdoctoral Fellowships at UNAM | CxAnnouncements | Scoop.it
The National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) has an open call for postdoctoral fellowships to start in September, 2017. 

Candidates should have obtained a PhD degree within the last three years and be under 36 years, both to the date of the beginning of the fellowship.
 There will be another call to begin March, 2018 closing around June 2017.

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Network Science PhD Program | Network Science Institute at Northeastern University

Network Science PhD Program | Network Science Institute at Northeastern University | CxAnnouncements | Scoop.it
The Network Science PhD program is a pioneering interdisciplinary program that provides the tools and concepts aimed at understanding the structure and dynamics of networks arising from the interplay of human behavior, socio-technical infrastructures, information diffusion and biological agents.

 

We expect applications from talented students from around the world with strong interdisciplinary interests.The priority application deadline for Fall 2017 is February 1, 2017.

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