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Astronomers observe two stars so close to each other that they will end up merging into a supermassive star

Astronomers observe two stars so close to each other that they will end up merging into a supermassive star | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it
A study of 'MY Camelopardalis' binary system, published in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics, shows that the most massive stars are made up by merging with other smaller stars, as predicted by theoretical models.

Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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27 Characteristics Of Authentic Assessment - TeachThought

27 Characteristics Of Authentic Assessment - TeachThought | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it
Ed note: This post by the late Grant Wiggins has been republished from a previous post. Please visit Authentic Education to support the work his wife and peers are continuing.

What is “authentic assessment”?

Almost 25 years ago, I wrote a widely-read and discussed paper that was entitled: “A True Test: Toward More Authentic and Equitable Assessment” that was published in the Phi Delta Kappan. I believe the phrase was my coining, made when I worked with Ted Sizer at the Coalition of Essential Schools, as a way of describing “true” tests as opposed to merely academic and unrealistic school tests. I first used the phrase in print in an article for Educational Leadership entitled “Teaching to the (Authentic) Test” in the April 1989 issue.

(My colleague from the Advisory Board of the Coalition of Essential Schools, Fred Newmann, was the first to use the phrase in a book, a pamphlet for NASSP in 1988 entitled Beyond standardized testing: Assessing authentic academic achievement in secondary schools. His work in the Chicago public schools provided significant findings about the power of working this way.)

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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, April 2, 1:14 PM
Grant Wiggins' article is dated, but useful. Authentic assessment includes authentic problems to be solved given a context. It does not mean students only do projects and do authentic assessment tasks. Good teachers understand that they lay the ground work for the projects and assessment.
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What Separates Good Writing From Bad Writing?

What Separates Good Writing From Bad Writing? | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it
Author and professor Adam Grant said, “Good communicators make themselves look smart. Great communicators make their audiences feel smart."

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12 Rules Of Great Teaching -

12 Rules Of Great Teaching - | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it
12 Rules Of Great Teaching by Terry Heick Recently, I’ve been thinking of the universal truths in teaching. Students should be first. Don’t always start planning with a standard. Questions matter more than answers. Trust is a currency of a human classroom. So I thought I’d gather twelve of them to start with. The idea …

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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, March 5, 1:26 AM
12 Rules Of Great Teaching
Mélene Dosou's comment, April 14, 6:42 PM
Ciao, per tutte le vostre esigenze di finanziamento e di altri, si prega di contattare me per maggiori dettagli.
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Mélene Dosou's comment, April 14, 6:42 PM
Ciao, per tutte le vostre esigenze di finanziamento e di altri, si prega di contattare me per maggiori dettagli.
gmail: gabrielli.alessandro6@gmail.com
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Sir Ken Robinson’s Next Act: You Are the System and You Can Change Education | EdSurge News

Sir Ken Robinson’s Next Act: You Are the System and You Can Change Education | EdSurge News | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it
Sir Ken Robinson’s views on creativity are abundantly well documented. In his 2006 TED Talk—still the most-watched of all time—he claimed that “we are educating people out of their creative capacities” and charged the current education system with being too rigid in adhering to traditional academic subjects. Kids, he argued, need time to dance, draw, create and find what they’re good at.

But he hasn’t given up on schools or education—far from it, in fact. For his follow-up act, Robinson is releasing a new book for parents on how to raise capable children who thrive in school. Make no mistake, though, he’s still shaking up the system (and redefining what that actually means).

In a wide-ranging interview, Robinson recently spoke with us about collaboration versus competition, the all-important parent-teacher relationship and what every parent and educator can do to improve education.

Via Jim Lerman
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Mélene Dosou's comment, April 14, 6:39 PM
Ciao, per tutte le vostre esigenze di finanziamento e di altri, si prega di contattare me per maggiori dettagli.
gmail: gabrielli.alessandro6@gmail.com
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The sorry state of #Earth's species, in numbers On the road to sixth mass #extinction thx to the majority of people aka #Mankind

The sorry state of #Earth's species, in numbers On the road to sixth mass #extinction thx to the majority of people aka #Mankind | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it
The Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) issued a dire diagnosis Friday of Earth's plant and animal species.
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Cloud quantum computing calculates nuclear binding energy of deuterium

Cloud quantum computing calculates nuclear binding energy of deuterium | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it

Cloud quantum computing has been used to calculate the binding energy of the deuterium nucleus – the first-ever such calculation done using quantum processors at remote locations. Nuclear physicists led by Eugene Dumitrescu at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the US used publicly available software to achieve the remote operation of two distant quantum computers. Their work could lead to new opportunities for scientists in many fields who want to use quantum simulations to calculate properties of matter.

 

In previous research, scientists have worked alongside quantum computer hardware developers to create quantum simulations. These typically use between two and six qubits to calculate a quantum property of matter – calculations that can be extremely time-consuming to do with a conventional computer. As the number of qubits available in quantum computers increase, the hope is that quantum simulations will be able to do calculations well beyond the reach of even the most powerful conventional computers. However, doing simulations alongside quantum computer specialists can be an inefficient process and the research would be much more streamlined if scientists were able to operate quantum computers themselves.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Gaining a deeper understanding of the genetics of autism

Gaining a deeper understanding of the genetics of autism | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it

It’s been 10 years since Michael Wigler had a breakthrough revelation in autism genetics — one that arguably launched the field as we know it. In April 2007, Wigler and his then colleague, Jonathan Sebat, reported that ‘de novo’ mutations — those that arise spontaneously instead of being inherited — occur more often in people with autism than in typical people. The mutations they noted were in the form of ‘copy number variants’ (CNVs), deletions or duplications of long stretches of DNA. CNVs crop up frequently in cancer, an earlier focus of Wigler’s work. But his find that they are also involved in autism came as a surprise to those in the field. “Genetics was striking out with other efforts based on transmission and inheritance,” Wigler says. “In that vacuum, the new idea was quickly embraced.”

 

The discovery fast led to further advances. Focusing primarily on de novomutations, three teams of scientists, including one led by Wigler, began hunting for genes that contribute to autism. Their approach was efficient: Rather than looking at the entire genome, they scoured the 2 percent that encodes proteins, called the exome. And they looked specifically at simplex families, which have a single child with autism and unaffected parents and siblings. The premise was that comparing the exomes of the family members might expose de novo mutations in the child with autism. The approach yielded a bumper crop: Based on data from more than 600 families, the teams together predicted that there are hundreds of autism genes. They identified six as leading candidates. Some of the genes identified at the time — CHD8, DYRK1A, SCN2A — quickly became hot areas of research.

 

In 2014, the number of strong candidates jumped higher. In two massive studies analyzing the sequences of more than 20,000 people, researchers linked 50 genes to autism with high confidence. Wigler’s team looked at simplex families and found rare de novo mutations in 27 genes. In the second study, researchers screened for both inherited and de novo mutations and implicated 33 genes. The two studies identified 10 genes in common.

 

Then, in 2016, the tally of autism gene candidates shot up again. Deploying statistical wizardry to combine the data on de novo and inherited mutations, along with CNV data from the Autism Genome Project, researchers pinpointed 65 genes and six CNVs as being key to autism. They also identified 28 genes that they could say with near certainty are ‘autism genes.’

 

“For so long, we’ve been saying if we could just find these genes, we’d be able to really make some headway,” says Stephan Sanders, assistant professor of psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco, who co-led the study. “Suddenly, you’ve got this list of 65-plus genes, which we know have a causative role in autism, and as a foundation for going forward, it’s amazing.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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25 Quotes from Powerful Women in STEM Who Will Inspire You

25 Quotes from Powerful Women in STEM Who Will Inspire You | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it
These powerful women in STEM never backed down from pursuing their passions, and those enduring legacies continue to move other women into the STEM fields.

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I want to stroll Tehran's streets at night, like men can: writer Fereshteh Ahmadi | Saeed Kamali Dehghan

I want to stroll Tehran's streets at night, like men can: writer Fereshteh Ahmadi | Saeed Kamali Dehghan | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it
Under Hassan Rouhani’s less repressive regime, female authors are starting to see their books in print, and daring to dream of greater independence

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9 Creative Storytelling Methods

9 Creative Storytelling Methods | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it
When an author set out to tell a story in years past, he or she typically did so on paper, a typewriter or by typing at a computer.

But today, storytellers find imaginative ways to share their ideas with interactive and visual elements. On modern mediums like Twitter, Vine, YouTube and other mobile applications, storytellers are crafting tales in ways that would have been unfathomable a decade ago.

Offline, too, authors have begun rethinking the traditional concept of the book in ways both innovative and unorthodox. Might a story be better understood as a set of machine parts? How might destroying a book actually bring its messages to life?

Here are nine ways authors are revolutionizing the way stories are told.

Via Ariana Amorim, Jim Lerman
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2,000-year-old pre-Aztec ancient palace complex found in Mexico

2,000-year-old pre-Aztec ancient palace complex found in Mexico | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it
Two American Museum of Natural History anthropologists discovered an ancient palace complex in Mexico that is likely over 2,000 years old.
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UN Report Says Small-Scale Organic Farming Only Way To Feed The World

UN Report Says Small-Scale Organic Farming Only Way To Feed The World | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it
Even as the United States government continues to push for the use of more chemically-intensive and corporate-dominated farming methods such as GMOs an
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Eric Larson's curator insight, March 27, 2017 11:11 AM
Small scale organics?
Eric Larson's curator insight, March 29, 2017 1:41 PM
Only way to feed  the world?
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Stress on the Great Barrier Reef : Image of the Day #Satellite #science #facts #Greenpeace #GroenLinks #PvdD

Stress on the Great Barrier Reef : Image of the Day #Satellite #science #facts #Greenpeace #GroenLinks #PvdD | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it
In February 2017, the Great Barrier Reef continued to be exposed to warm ocean water—the main stressor on this coral system and the reason for its bleaching.

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Memoir Monday: The best first-person writing from across the web

Memoir Monday: The best first-person writing from across the web | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it

Via The Scout Report

 

"Memoir Monday is a weekly newsletter dedicated to the genre of life-writing. The newsletter is "curated" by Narratively, Catapult, Granta, Guernica, Longreads, and Tin House and features the best life-writing published in all six publications. In doing so, the team behind Memoir Monday make it easy for readers to find high-quality, humorous, and poignant stories. Each selection is accompanied by a short description. Visitors can sign up to receive Memoir Monday in their email inbox for free. Alternatively, readers can explore all past newsletters on this website."


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How Nations Make Up National Identities 

Nationality feels powerful, especially today. But the idea of identifying with millions of strangers just based on borders is relatively new. We explain wh

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8 Needs For Project-Based Learning In The 21st Century

8 Needs For Project-Based Learning In The 21st Century | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it
“ We tend to think of project-based learning as focused on research, planning problem-solving, authenticity, and inquiry. Further, collaboration, resourcefulness, and networking matter too–dozens of characteristics “fit” into project-based learning. Its popularity comes from, among other characteristics, its general flexibility as a curriculum framework. You can do, teach, assess, and connect almost anything within the context of a well-designed project. But what if we had to settle on a handful (or two) of itemized characteristics for modern, connected, possibly place-based, and often digital project-based learning? Well, then the following might be useful.”
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Tears, silence and anger: Hundreds of thousands march worldwide to demand action on guns

Tears, silence and anger: Hundreds of thousands march worldwide to demand action on guns | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON — Tears rolled down Emma Gonzalez’s face as she stood in silence. For 6 minutes and 20 seconds — the time it took for a killer to rampage through Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., and kill 17 last month — Emma held the attention of hundreds of thousands at the March for Our Lives in Washington — mostly by standing quietly, a piercing figure with close-cropped hair in a t-shirt, Army …

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Teaching for the Future | OECD READ edition | #ModernEDUcation #ModernLEARNing (#PDF)

Teaching for the Future | OECD READ edition | #ModernEDUcation #ModernLEARNing (#PDF) | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it

Teachers are the most important school-related factor influencing student learning. Teachers can help level the playing field and provide opportunities...

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=OECD

 


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Oskar Almazan's curator insight, March 26, 9:09 AM
Teachers are the most important school-related factor influencing student learning. Teachers can help level the playing field and provide opportunities for success to all their students. They can inspire students to innovate; to think and reflect and to work in collaboration with others.
Félix Santamaria's curator insight, March 27, 11:19 AM
Share your insight
Geemik Maria Açucena Da Silva's curator insight, April 7, 8:23 AM
"Teachers are the most important school-related factor influencing student learning. Teachers can help level the playing field and provide opportunities for success to all their students. They can inspire students to innovate; to think and reflect and to work in collaboration with others."
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The Genome Hacker Who Mapped a 13-Million-Person Family Tree

The Genome Hacker Who Mapped a 13-Million-Person Family Tree | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it

Huge crowdsourced genealogy databases are inspiring new genetics research.

 

Yaniv Erlich has been a white-hat hacker and a geneticist at Columbia University, and now he works for a genealogy company.

This unusual career trajectory has led, most recently, to a 13-million-person family tree unveiled recently in Science. The massive trove of data comes from public profiles on the crowdsourced genealogy website Geni.com, and it sheds light on human longevity and dispersal over time. (I wrote about a preprint of this paper last year.) But most of all, Erlich is excited about overlaying DNA information on top of family trees to study genes implicated in disease.

 

MyHeritage, the company behind Geni.com, also sells DNA ancestry tests. And since 2017, Erlich has been on leave from Columbia working as MyHeritage’s chief scientific officer to develop those DNA tests.

 

If that sounds like a lot of data going into the hands of one company, well, it is. Erlich has very much been in discussions about DNA research and privacy. In 2013, he showed it was possible, using only public information in places like consumer genealogy databases, to identify certain study participants who had contributed their DNA to research projects. For this feat, Nature dubbed him the “genome hacker.”


Via Integrated DNA Technologies, Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Empower Your Students with The 4 C's Learning Menu

Empower Your Students with The 4 C's Learning Menu | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it
The 4 C’s are integral to dynamic learning, and every dynamic learning experience should include at least one of the 4 Cs.

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Staple Food Crops of the World

Staple Food Crops of the World | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it
Our MapMaker Interactive layers show how many tons of cassava, maize, plantains, potatoes, rice, sorghum, soybeans, sweet potatoes, wheat, and yams were produced per country as an average from 2010 to 2012.
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#Sweden is paying people to fix their belongings instead of throwing them away #consumerism #pollution #environment

#Sweden is paying people to fix their belongings instead of throwing them away #consumerism #pollution #environment | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it
To combat its ‘throwaway consumer culture’, Sweden has announced tax breaks on repairs to clothes, bicycles, fridges and washing machines. Will it help to reduce waste?

Via Andy Dorn, talkingdrumnigeria
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Curriculum Resources - National Wildlife Federation

monarch butterfly curriculum and lesson plans

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Geology IN: How A.I. captured a volcano's changing lava lake

Geology IN: How A.I. captured a volcano's changing lava lake | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it
Artificial intelligence onboard NASA's Earth Observing 1 (EO-1) spacecraft assisted in imaging an eruption at Erta'Ale volcano

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Death toll doubles in Ethiopia garbage dump collapse

Death toll doubles in Ethiopia garbage dump collapse | Curriculum Resources | Scoop.it

"The death toll from a collapse at a landfill outside Ethiopia’s capital has risen sharply to 113, an Addis Ababa city official said Wednesday, as the country began three days of mourning for victims who were mostly women and children. Saturday’s collapse of a mountain of garbage buried makeshift mud-and-stick homes inside the Koshe landfill on the outskirts of the capital."


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Katie Kershaw's curator insight, March 31, 3:36 PM
When I think of dumps or garbage I usually don’t think of them being deadly.  Unfortunately in Addis Ababa, part of the dump collapsed and 113 people ended up dying.  Not only did the collapse injure people, but it also wiped out the homes that surround the area.  The lack of codes about infrastructure in the city is most likely the cause of this incident.  There were no regulations about how garbage had to be dumped in order to keep it from collapsing.  There were also no rules about how homes should be built or where they could be built.  This article points out that there were attempts made in order to stop dumping at this particular landfill, but the dumping was resumed right before the collapse.  The government also relocated some of the residents that lived by the dump, but were not able to move everyone before the accident.  Although efforts were made to avoid a situation like this, the government wasn’t forceful or fast enough to prevent it.  Many of the victims of this were women and children which is telling of the culture of the city.  The women and children scavenge the landfill in order to find things they can either repurpose for themselves or sell to make money.  The last section of the article also says that Ethiopia prides itself as being one of Africa’s fastest growing economies.  But this incident shows that they still have a ways to go before they can become a more developed country.
tyrone perry's curator insight, April 5, 3:26 PM
Inside the Koshe landfill in Ethiopia, there were makeshift mud and stick homes.  Residents say the collapse the has killed over a hundred residents could have been because of protests at another landfill and some blamed the construction at a new waste to energy plant at Koshe.  families who lost loved ones haverecieved or will receive any where from $430 to $650 each and will be resettled permanently in the coming years.  It is sad to see people living like this but most of all to see a government allow such situations to exist.
Matt Manish's curator insight, May 3, 12:08 AM
According to this article, Ethiopia has one of Africa's fastest growing economies. This tragic event makes me wonder about the spatial inequality of Ethiopia's capital city Addis Ababa. Especially, since capital cities in most nations are usually the most developed part of the country. It would seem that is a more highly developed area like a capital city in Ethiopia, that there would be more adequate housing for residents than a landfill, even if those residents are considered to be poor. From looking at this article it seems as though there must be a wealthier class in the city that is developing rapidly, while the poorer community is forced to live on the outskirts in the landfill. Hopefully a tragedy such as this one never happens again and more suitable housing can be found for the lower class in Ethiopia.