Current Hotel and Resort Industry Trends and Information
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Another 10 Craziest Hotels (cool hotel, waterworld hotel, capsule hotel) - ODDEE

Another 10 Craziest Hotels (cool hotel, waterworld hotel, capsule hotel) - ODDEE | Current Hotel and Resort Industry Trends and Information | Scoop.it
From a hotel made of wine barrels, to another one where you can have dinner with a giraffe, see 10 of the weirdest yet amazing hotels. (cool hotel, waterworld hotel, capsule hotel)
Olivia McDonald/James Armstrong's insight:

The world wants new, the world wants unique. This is exactly what these entrepreneurs and artists were thinking when they built these very stylish, and very successful hotels. These people decided that the conventional high rise didn't offer enough to them so they built it their way. From the safari hotel where a local herd of giraffes pop their heads in to say hello and grab a bite to eat, to the hotel set inside a historical water tower, there is something for everyone. The most innovative without a doubt is the transportable hotel room that can be fitted to piers and rooftops yet still costs less than $800 for a night. The view from on top of Palais de Tokyo.
Recently a Chinese group went about creating a quarry in order to build a hotel within, an amazing feat for more reasons than one as it means that they avoid the levels of smog that other hotels need to deal with as well as allowing themselves to create an enclosed area in which to build their own waterfall. I hope that in the future we see more of these unique hotel ideas coming about throughout the world.

James Armstrong 

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Doze Off under the Northern Lights

Doze Off under the Northern Lights | Current Hotel and Resort Industry Trends and Information | Scoop.it
In Finland, nature’s most spectacular light show, the Aurora Borealis, can be viewed in a range of purpose-built spaces from glass igloos to luxury suites.
Olivia McDonald/James Armstrong's insight:

Natural attractions are almost guaranteed to draw a crowd, it's up to entrepreneurs to jump on gaps in the market and market these places to make them more desirable to consumers. That is exactly what has happened in Finland with a number of hotels bringing a new style of hotel room to the market. These rooms with a view aren't what you'd expect, they look up, not over or down. Their glass dome ceiling allow amazing views of the Northern Lights which glow across the sky at night revealing one of the many beautiful treasures nature has to offer. In addition to this, others have built hotels up the sides of hills to allow for a more typical approach in room style while still being able to offer a glass roof for 180 degree viewing.
Not only are these hotel rooms beautiful to look at, their igloo style means they fit perfectly with the landscape and snow and their low light emissions mean they impact very little on the viewing of the Northern Lights.
These style rooms are something I can see being adopted in low light areas throughout the world to offer a wonderful view of sleeping in comfort under the stars. 

 

James Armstrong. 

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Biggest hotel groups and brands of 2013: American companies still dominate

Biggest hotel groups and brands of 2013: American companies still dominate | Current Hotel and Resort Industry Trends and Information | Scoop.it
This would not come as a surprise to any watcher of the global hotel industry, but American and then European companies still dominate the rankings of the
Olivia McDonald/James Armstrong's insight:

Inside every major city you will find the same thing: large big name hotels only different from their sister properties because of location and smaller, local and national brands of hotels who thrive only in the city they currently reside. It's almost shocking whn you realise just how few of these smaller hotels there are, about 25%. As told by Richardson, L 2014: "75% of all hotels are under the flag of chains." Although it's not growth for all businesses, Accor lost 15.3% of their rooms due to a recent offloading of their Motel6 brand.

In the growth area, China's Home Inn reported a 21.2% growth in number of rooms available. This also links to the previous article in which China's hospitlaity investments in Australia were discussed. It is extremely possible that Home Inn will become a well known brand within the international hospitality and tourism industries.
All other big brands recorded a rather small increase or decrease in number of rooms available, usually around 2%. It is also interesting to note that the majority of these top hotels originate from America and have moved international, allowing room for only two European and one Asian brand to join them in the top ten.

 

 

Richarson, L, 2014,  ‘Lecture notes: Major Industry Sectors (Slide 32: Australia's first six star hotel)’, Hotel & Resort Operations, William Angliss Hospitality Department, Melbourne. 

 

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Before You Book: Eco-Friendly Hotel Or Just Greenwashing?

Before You Book: Eco-Friendly Hotel Or Just Greenwashing? | Current Hotel and Resort Industry Trends and Information | Scoop.it
velo_city, Flickr
We've all stayed at hotels that proudly boast, via little signs on the bed and/or bathroom sink, that they're doing their part to sa
Olivia McDonald/James Armstrong's insight:

As the hospitality industry continues to grow and diversify,so do the needs of consumers. You only need to look into a hotel bathroom for seconds to find the card that states what should be done with towels to help the environment. These cards are proof that the industry evolves with customers due to the recent understanding of the need for individuals to help the environment thrive.
However, these among other tactics can be just a ploy to generate business from consumers who would not stay there otherwise. The term 'greenwashing' (or green hustling) is used to describe the act of trying to appear conscious about the environment while in reality doing very little to help. This article discusses what to look out for when staying in and booking hotels to ensure you aren't looking at a greenwashed property including areas such as restaurants, furniture, amenities, gardens and certifications. In the end it's up to the consumer to do their research; a geenwashed organisation is one that's jumping on the bandwagon, a greenwashed consumer is one that doesn't research their options.

Richarson, L, 2014,  ‘Lecture notes: Corporate Social Responsibility in the Hotel and Resort Industry (Slide 2: Greenwashing/Greenhustling)’, Hotel & Resort Operations, William Angliss Hospitality Department, Melbourne.  

 

James Armstrong.

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10 Amazing Hotels You Need To Visit Before You Die - Earth Porm

10 Amazing Hotels You Need To Visit Before You Die - Earth Porm | Current Hotel and Resort Industry Trends and Information | Scoop.it
Get Ready To See Some of the Most Amazing Hotels You Need To Visit Before You Die
Olivia McDonald/James Armstrong's insight:

 

As the name suggests, this article lists and describes ten hotels which should be seen 'before you die'. Whether it boasts breath-taking natural landscapes, innovative architecture or fascinating locations, its interesting to note that each hotel listed was unique in it's own way. I believe that 'uniqueness' is an important concept in today's accommodation and travel industry, that being said with much consideration to the competitive environment in which these industries operate. When discussing motivations behind travel, many are eager to express their longing for the exploration of the unknown and undiscovered, as well as their desire to be immersed in new cultures, concepts, and ways of life. Unique hotels and resorts play on this motivation, positioning themselves as rare accommodation experiences in comparison to the large sea of competitors who offer products and services that parallel. These 'unique' hotels' ability to appeal to travellers senses of curiosity and adventure allows these hotels to give themselves a competitive edge over their rivals, an important element to have in order to be successful in the industry. From a traveller perspective, unique hotels are a way of diversifying our travel experience and can sometimes be seen as attractions in themselves. Furthermore, unique hotels are good value for social interactions as they allow for interesting travel stories and photos.

 

Unusual Hotels of the World:

http://www.unusualhotelsoftheworld.com/

 

Olivia McDonald

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Airbnb: Spare room revolution

Airbnb: Spare room revolution | Current Hotel and Resort Industry Trends and Information | Scoop.it
Got room? Airbnb is literally changing how we live.
Olivia McDonald/James Armstrong's insight:

 

If the accommodation industry wasn't competitive enough with options such as hotels, hostels, serviced apartments, backpackers, B&B’s, motels and so forth, the introduction of ‘airbnb’ has definitely caused a stir. Airbnb is the latest competitor in the accommodation industry, offering accommodation to travellers through a network of people willing to offer their room or apartment for a price. From a traveller’s perspective, I believe that airbnb is a practical accommodation option as it offers cheap accommodation in a range of locations and styles that may have been much more expensive elsewhere. Furthermore, airbnb allows for a social experience whereby travellers have the opportunity to socialise with people who they are sharing a house with. This social interaction can be rather attractive to single travellers, for example, who may be looking for company and support during their travels.  Airbnb is also beneficial to owners of the rooms or apartments as it works as a good source of extra income. From a negative viewpoint, airbnb has the capacity to attract unwanted guests. Whilst this has not been the case for many users, it may always be a possibility that the person behind the other computer screen is dangerous. In addition, websites such as airbnb are a major threat to other players in the accommodation industry, particularly hotels. With some airbnb users offering great prices on modern houses and apartments with central locations, it’s unreasonable to think that many travellers would pay more money to stay in a hotel that was just as good. In comparing hotels with airbnb, I think its also important to note the flexibility that airbnb offers to its users, an area which hotels struggle with at times and an area that can fuel guest irritation. Overall, airbnb is booming at the moment among travellers (and for good reason), but this is definitely coming at the discomfort of other accommodation providers.

 

Airbnb:

https://www.airbnb.com.au/

 

Olivia McDonald

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Hollywood Hotel Pooch: Luxury dog hotel where every whim is catered for

Hollywood Hotel Pooch: Luxury dog hotel where every whim is catered for | Current Hotel and Resort Industry Trends and Information | Scoop.it
Palatial suites, swimming pool, plasma TVs, spa treatments, even bedtime stories... Clemmie Moody visits the luxury LA hotel for pampered pets
Olivia McDonald/James Armstrong's insight:

 

Hotels are no longer a luxury reserved for humans as the development of some niche markets has been directed towards new consumers.  This article discusses the boom in one particular niche market of accommodation; that market being pet accommodation. While this hotel idea may seem ‘far-fetched’ to some, I believe that the market for pet hotels is innovative and fun. Many people can agree that pets these days are commonly seen as a part of the family; another ‘child’ if you will. With that title comes the demand from pet owners to offer special services for their furry friends. 'Pooch Hotel', a luxury hotel for dogs situated in Los Angeles, California, is the result of efforts made to meet this demand, opening its door to pets far and wide to provide luxurious pet accommodation. Precious pets can now look forward to premium treatment with Pooch hotel boasting features inclusive to 'a spa, in-room entertainment, a state-of-the-art gym and personalised turn-down service’ and much, much more. Pet owners can now feel relieved knowing that, in the event that they must leave their beloved, they can leave them in the trustworthy hands of caring pet hotel attendants. Despite its niche nature, the demand for pet accommodation seems to be spreading like wildfire with nine pet hotels already operating in the US alone. While I believe that some of the services offered by these pet hotels are unnecessary (such as pet manicures), I do support furthering the development of this market based on the idea that animals are also emotional creatures and should be treated with respect in the absence of their owner.

 

Pooch Hotel:

http://www.poochhotel.com/

 

Olivia McDonald

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TripAdvisor Dominates Hotel Reviews But Isn't Your Only Option

TripAdvisor Dominates Hotel Reviews But Isn't Your Only Option | Current Hotel and Resort Industry Trends and Information | Scoop.it
More than half of the world's travelers read reviews before they book a hotel. That's according to research from the international marketing firm of PhoCusWright. Eighty percent of respondents...
Olivia McDonald/James Armstrong's insight:

 In summation, this article discusses the influence that websites such as Trip Advisor have on its users and viewers, as well the tourism providers that it enlists. Personally, I believe that Trip Advisor is a valuable tool for both traveller and tourism provider and is beneficial in closing the gap between consumer expectation and consumer reality.

 

From a traveller perspective, I believe that websites like Trip Advisor are incredibly insightful as they essentially exist to shed light on the truth behind some tourism operators which, without their help, may not have been revealed to the buyer’s eye. As noted in the article, Trip Advisor itself was developed after its creator made the observation that pictures and comments about hotels and resorts were only those posted and monitored by the actually companies themselves. This control that tourism providers had over consumer perception was unfair so Trip Advisor worked to change this by ensuring their website worked towards three key purposes; to promote transparency, to level the playing field for large and small hotels, and to democratize the industry.

 

From a tourism provider perspective, I believe that websites such as Trip Advisor have become both an opportunity and a threat to business. In terms of threats, websites such as Trip Advisor are likely to harbour negative comments about tourism providers. These posts are out of a business’ span of control and are often quick to highlight the weaknesses of a business. These posts are particularly unfavourable as they have the potential to change the perception one may have on a business despite their lack of experience with that particular business. Alternatively, websites such as Trip Advisor have the capacity to promote businesses through positive ratings and reviews. This is particularly beneficial to tourism providers as it works to generate positive word-of-mouth advertising which comes at no cost to the business and can be seen as one of the most successful outlets of advertising. Furthermore, while hotels and resorts can’t control what is being said about them online, they can use a tool provided to them by Trip Advisor to directly respond to comments made about them. Some consumers may value this tool as they may view it as an outlet in which the business can provide a new level of customer service. It gives the consumers a chance to view how specific businesses resolve issues. This tool also allows businesses to show users that they actually care about what is being said about them and value any feedback given. Lastly, while hotels and resorts may not be able to control what is being said about them, they are able to observe what is being said about them. In this instance they can use Trip Advisor and other relating websites as a tool to highlight what guest are finding good or bad about their stay. They can then use this information to improve their business which may then build to more positive ratings and reviews.

 

Olivia McDonald

 

Trip Advisor

http://www.tripadvisor.com.au/

 

 

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Marriott: free hotel Internet is the new bottled water

Marriott: free hotel Internet is the new bottled water | Current Hotel and Resort Industry Trends and Information | Scoop.it
Hotel Internet is becoming on par with bottled water, says Marriott – something that travellers and guests expect to see in their room for free. But, perhaps like bottled water, the more Inte...
Olivia McDonald/James Armstrong's insight:

 

In out technological advanced world, most people take what they have for granted which is why it can be quite a shock to some people to walk into a hotel and find that there's no free internet, or even worse: that they don't offer it. Fortunately most do but this is putting pressure on hotels to try to keep up with demand as the more they offer, the more it's used. What we do see however is businesses who do not take on the stresses of keeping up with technology and offering it for free or a cheap price will be left bad reviews. This is most important with business and international visitors as it can basically be referred to as their life-blood: without it, they are unable to contact the people they are away from i.e. their families and coworkers.

It is understandable that not all businesses are able to offer free internet nor bottled water to guests, but in that case they should really be looking at where their business is heading because if they decide not to move forward with everyone else, then they, as well as their business will be left behind.

 

James Armstrong

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Jordan’s Green Hotels

Jordan’s Green Hotels | Current Hotel and Resort Industry Trends and Information | Scoop.it
Jordan's first and only
Olivia McDonald/James Armstrong's insight:

When looking at hotel and resort news, we tend to look at the new innovations from large companies in large cities. This article goes against that norm and looks at Jordan's top eco hotels.
Jordan is a small country located between Israel and Iraq in the Middle East. As these are not big tourism destinations, it is of no surprise that neither is Jordan. With the government on their side and few resources to make things happen, Jordan has completed their "first and only 'true ecolodge' that tries to leave a minimal footprint on its desert ecosystem." On top of this, one of their aspiring hoteliers has won an International Swiss Award for his resort's models of sustainability that he has been able build his business upon. His truly amazing business model means that electricity is sparingly used in a few of the rooms after being collected through solar panels while the rest of the property is lit through candles made locally or through by products of local production of olive oil.

This is an example of how eco hotels worldwide are sustaining their business, local businesses and the environment, it's amazing.

James Armstrong 

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Chinese increase their bets on Australia's tourism industry

Chinese increase their bets on Australia's tourism industry | Current Hotel and Resort Industry Trends and Information | Scoop.it
Chinese investors, done splurging on Australia's once-booming mining industry, are sniffing around the country's tourism market in search of bargains.
Olivia McDonald/James Armstrong's insight:

Foreign investments currently make up a high amount of investments within Australia's hospitality and tourism industries. Last year, investors from Hong Kong and China made up 18% of Australian Hospitality asset investments. This is because there is continuous growth within our market, especially with tourists from China who continue to travel here at an increasing rate of about +14% per year with a record 748,000 last year alone. These investments have been matched with three of the largest Chinese airlines offering flights direct to Australia. But investments aren't only going into major cities, this article also looks at the plans to build a theme park and replica gates in a coastal town named Wyong.

Australia's first six star hotel can be attributed to Chinese investments as well. The Palazzo Versace on the Gold Coast was purchased last year for $69 million and looks to be the world's first fashion hotel with high end designs and furniture as well as the ability to accommodate guest's pets, a service rarely seen past service animals.

These investments look to make great returns due to the continuous growth of Australia's tourism industry as well as helping to stimulate the growth.

 

Richarson, L, 2014,  ‘Lecture notes: Major Industry Sectors (Slide 22: Australia's first six star hotel)’, Hotel & Resort Operations, William Angliss Hospitality Department, Melbourne. 

 

James Armstrong

 

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Hospitality Net - Four Seasons Soars to New Heights with Hotel Industry’s First Fully Branded Jet

Hospitality Net - Four Seasons Soars to New Heights with Hotel Industry’s First Fully Branded Jet | Current Hotel and Resort Industry Trends and Information | Scoop.it
The sky is literally the new limit as Four Seasons continues to reimagine luxury hospitality with the
introduction of the Four Seasons Jet, the industry's first fully branded private jet experience.
Olivia McDonald/James Armstrong's insight:

 

Four Seasons Resorts and Hotels seem to be leading the way in accommodation innovations, recently announcing plans to release its own range of self-titled jetliner's. Each new jet is expected to take accommodation from land to the skies, a concept that has yet to be adopted by other hoteliers or airline groups . As noted in the article, guests of the Four Seasons Jet Experience can look forward to many luxurious features such as individually hand-crafted leather flatbed seats, globally inspired cuisine and signature, in-flight Wi-Fi, spa treatments and so on. Whilst I believe the idea sounds expensive in terms of operational costs, I find the concept rather intriguing and exciting. I find that travelling can sometimes be stressful given the number of things that need to be addressed such as airfares, accommodation, attractions, transport and so on. The benefit of this idea is that it can relieve some of the stress related with planning travel due to its ability to combine airfare and accommodation. For those who have the money to afford it, travelling via the Four Season Jet may also be a way to avoid nuisances related to regular air travel such as limited space, lack of entertainment, poor cuisine and loss of time. Four Seasons, I believe, has successfully identified this gap in the market and has found a viable way to cater to the evolving wants and needs of it's guests. Furthermore, the Four Seasons Jet Experience can be viewed as an attraction within itself due to its singularity in the accommodation market thus far. This aspect has the capacity to appeal to many as its offers a truly special travel experience that cannot be found elsewhere. Fours Seasons Hotels and Resorts really has taken the saying 'the sky's the limit' to a whole new level. A luxury level at that.

 

Four Seasons Private Jet Experience:

http://www.fourseasons.com/aroundtheworld/

 

Olivia McDonald

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Hyatt Hotels’ Alleged Employee Abuse Highlights Global Concerns

Hyatt Hotels’ Alleged Employee Abuse Highlights Global Concerns | Current Hotel and Resort Industry Trends and Information | Scoop.it
Grand Hyatt workers and supporters strike outside of the Grand Hyatt in the Union Square area of downtown San Francisco, Thursday, Nov. 5, 2009. (AP Photo/, Abuse, Campaign, Chicago, Demonstrations, Health, Jobs, Labor, Los Angeles, mph11p6, mph7p6, National, Press, US, Women,
Olivia McDonald/James Armstrong's insight:

 

If there's one thing that can be noted from this article, it's that the treatment of employees is a matter to be taken seriously. As an employee of a hotel myself, I believe that hotel giants such as the Hyatt need to be less concerned with their bottom line and more concerned with their staff. I personally believe that hotels should work to maximise their profits through treating their staff with respect, which in turn will work to increase staff retention and decrease hiring and training costs associated with high staff turnover. Staff have the potential to be a company's most valuable asset, but this comes at the price of fair working conditions. Hospitality is an industry notorious for its long hours,  and physically enduring environments. This  already unfavourable environment teamed with abuse from heartless management teams is a recipe for workplace stress and unhappiness. Unmotivated and unhappy staff is not beneficial for the individual or the company as it leaves way for poor customer service and inefficiency. Poor treatment of staff can also bring about bad publicity of a company, much like it has in this article about Grand Hyatt. Hotels should strive to be first choice employers through the promotion of safe and positive working environments.

 

Hyatt Hurts:

http://www.hyatthurts.org/

 

Olivia McDonald

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Cyprus sets hotel sustainability standards | Travel Daily UK

Cyprus sets hotel sustainability standards | Travel Daily UK | Current Hotel and Resort Industry Trends and Information | Scoop.it

DThe Cyprus Tourism Organisation has become the first tourism body to put measures in place to ensure…

Olivia McDonald/James Armstrong's insight:

 

As the concern for the conservation of the environment heightens, the demand for sustainable practices to be adopted in business strengthens. It seems that the Cyprus Tourism Organisation is leading the travel and accommodation industry in addressing these issues, being the first tourism organisation worldwide to announce that each and every hotel in Cyprus will now adhere to strict sustainable standards. Sustainability in Cyprus hotels is planned to be achieved through the implementation of standards such as reducing energy use, training staff in sustainability issues and sourcing local goods and services where possible. Understanding the importance of sustainability myself, I believe that this movement is revolutionary in leading the travel and accommodation industry into a more ‘socially responsible’ era. Implementing sustainable practices ensures the survivality of the travel and accommodation industry in the future as it works to protect the very things that draw us to travel; landscapes, life and culture. It is for this very reason that I believe other countries should follow in the footsteps of the Cyprus Tourism Organisation and work to make sustainable work practices business policy.

 

Cyprus Tourism Organisation:

http://www.visitcyprus.com/wps/portal

 

Olivia McDonald

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Asia’s international hotel boom

Due to the increase in domestic demand, the Asia-Pacific region is seeing an influx in development by international chains, such as Starwood, Hilton and Marriott.
Olivia McDonald/James Armstrong's insight:

 

In summation, this article discusses the rise in hotel developments in the Asia-Pacific region of the world. Over recent years, hotel chain giants such as Starwood, Hilton and Marriott have made their way in to the region, developing their properties so rapidly that United Nations World Travel Organisation has predicted that China's hotel market alone will ‘overtake the US’s as the world's largest by 2025, with around six million hotel rooms -- and almost double it by 2039’.

 

My opinions on this are two-sided. From one perspective, I believe that developing hotels in this region of the world is incredibly beneficial and is a key step towards enhancing the economic status of many Asian countries who are currently seen as ‘emerging’. Furthermore, I believe that developing hotels in this region of the world is a strategic move made by these hotel giants to raise brand recognition and association to encourage worldwide brand loyalty. As outlined in the article, having such big hotel names in the area may also encourage local hotel businesses to ‘step up their game’ in terms of higher levels of services and facilities in order to remain competitive.

 

Whilst these developments do prove to provide their benefits, I believe they also carry with them some negative attributes. Firstly, If American hotel giants are coming in and taking over, what chance do local hotel businesses have in comparison? While developing these hotels may increase tourism in the areas they’re built, it may not necessarily mean that tourist dollars are being spent on local products and services. Secondly, brand giants such as Starwood, Hilton and Marriott are known the world over for the high standard of customer service that they continue to provide to their guests. In the opening of any new hotel, customer service always comes in to scrutiny  and, with such a large number of new hotels opening, its plausible to worry that  the level of customer service that regular guests may expect from the brand giants may not be up to par. This issue in particular is a major threat as it has the opportunity to tarnish the good name of many of these hotel giants. In addition to possible service expectation gaps, community attitudes are also to be considered. Such rapid changes in local environments have the potential to expose host communities to feelings of irritation or antagonism as outlined by Doxey’s Irritation Index, a model based around the stages host communities experience with tourists. Irritated or antagonised host communities may lead to unpleasant travel experiences for tourists which may, in turn, discourage tourism activity in the area.

 

Conclusively, it can be stated that while the hotel boom in Asia-Pacific is generating economic benefit for the region and brand recognition for the hotel giants behind it all, the hotels come at the price of service expectation gaps, host community irritation and underlying economic issues.

 

Olivia McDonald

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Save money by outsourcing housekeeping staffing services | Hotel Management

Save money by outsourcing housekeeping staffing services | Hotel Management | Current Hotel and Resort Industry Trends and Information | Scoop.it
Outside staffing lets management focus on core functions ... if unions allow the practice.
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When asked what their guests wanted most from a hotel, a surveyed group of hotel managers decided that it was good service that came in first. So you can imagine their surprise when it was discovered that their guests had rated good service fourth out of the five criteria, the first of which was a clean appearance. (William Angliss, 2014).

 

The housekeeping department is one of the largest spending in a hotel, for wages in particular. Hotel managers have looked internally to reduce these costs through stock control and better employee retention as well as timing their work to make sure they are efficient as well as effective.

 

So how does a business reduce costs while also satisfying the guest’s number one expectation of cleanliness in a hotel? The answer that more and more companies are turning to is outsourcing. Now I know what you’re thinking: “outsourcing? Isn’t that when companies send jobs overseas?” I thought the exact same thing until I discovered there are companies that have filled this gap in the market to provide affordable housekeeping staffing solutions from a local base of workers. These companies are saving hotels quite a bit of money; to quote this Hotel Management article, “more than a 25% decrease in labor costs in the hotels where housekeeping was outsourced.”

 

This seemed like a great idea, until I looked at it from an employee perspective. I wondered: how well will these new employees fit into the culture of an organisation given they are from a completely different company? Luckily for me I was able to ask an industry professional from AHS Hospitality what her experience had been in this area. Employees are treated as part of the company, wearing the same uniforms and using the same staff areas. They are more than able to get to know their co-workers despite the fact they are not directly hired by the same company.

 

The outsourcing of housekeeping is a very smart move by businesses as it cuts back their payroll expense as well as relieving the mounting pressures the HR department have to attend to with increasing staff members. This practice is one that all larger hotels should look into should they choose to make the stresses of coordinating housekeeping less daunting.

 

James Armstrong

 

AHS Hospitality
http://www.ahshospitality.com.au/

 

 ‘Lecture notes: Organisational Structure – Functional Departments’, Hotel & Resort Operations, William Angliss Hospitality Department, Melbourne. 

 

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