Reading Shakespeare: Curation
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English Department's Site

English Department's Site | Reading Shakespeare: Curation | Scoop.it
C Alford's insight:

This Shakespearian language dictionary would be helpful in a demonstration/modeling lesson on how to read and comprehend Shakespeare.

 

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Team Teaching Shakespeare

Team Teaching Shakespeare | Reading Shakespeare: Curation | Scoop.it
Team teaching ideas for high school English. Great lesson plan for 2 teachers to team teach to English students. Using Shakespeare and iambic pentameters.
C Alford's insight:

This podcast is a great way to explain the literary importance of iambic pentameter and presents it in a great co-teaching lesson.

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Shakespeare Resource Center - The Language of Shakespeare

Shakespeare Resource Center - The Language of Shakespeare | Reading Shakespeare: Curation | Scoop.it
The most striking feature of Shakespeare is his command
of language. It is all the more astounding when one not only considers Shakespeare's sparse
formal education but the curriculum of the day.
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This guide would help define, explore, and explain the complex language of the Elizabeth langauge and Shakespeare's texts. 

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What Should Children Read?

What Should Children Read? | Reading Shakespeare: Curation | Scoop.it
Shakespeare vs. menus: The battle over public school reading lists.

 

David Coleman, president of the College Board, who helped design and promote the Common Core, says English classes today focus too much on self-expression. “It is rare in a working environment,” he’s argued, “that someone says, ‘Johnson, I need a market analysis by Friday but before that I need a compelling account of your childhood.’ ”

 

This and similar comments have prompted the education researcher Diane Ravitch to ask, “Why does David Coleman dislike fiction?” and to question whether he’s trying to eliminate English literature from the classroom. “I can’t imagine a well-developed mind that has not read novels, poems and short stories,” she writes.


Via Mary Daniels Brown
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Rescooped by C Alford from Shakespeare in the Classroom
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Digging Deeper: Multiple Readings of Hamlet Lesson Plan-Folger Shakespeare Library

Digging Deeper: Multiple Readings of Hamlet Lesson Plan-Folger Shakespeare Library | Reading Shakespeare: Curation | Scoop.it

From the always fantastic Folger website, I have pulled yet another beneficial resource. This lesson plan allows for a more in-depth look into the questions that aren't answered in the play, such as: "Is Hamlet truly mad or just feigning madness? Does Ophelia commit suicide or drown by accident?" There are many interpretations, and students will be able to explore them through this lesson.


Via Madeline Northey
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Katelyn Schultz's curator insight, May 27, 2017 12:08 AM
This scop links to an online resource that creates lesson plans based on a central theme about Hamlet.

The pre-reading exercise which maps characters of the play is quite effective, however there lacks a link to technology or using digital tools to enhance the learning experience.


*Perhaps using a Popplet as a mapping tool, rather than using student's books.
*Another way to innovate the task would be to film the character descriptions in a vlog-esque format. Upload the videos onto the class wiki and have students create a fake 'about me' section for the character's own wiki that the fake video may have come from. Perhaps from here, students could submit their answers through Socrative or a live Google Slides presentation so they can be reviewed by the class and combined to create the most accurate and comprehensive 'about me' to be added to the wiki under the fake vlog.
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With the Bard, all the classroom's indeed a stage - The Register-Guard

With the Bard, all the classroom's indeed a stage - The Register-Guard | Reading Shakespeare: Curation | Scoop.it
With the Bard, all the classroom's indeed a stage The Register-Guard But those who enroll in the weeklong Shakespeare in the Classroom summer program spend long days studying select passages, receiving lesson suggestions and finding new ways to...
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Introducing Iambic Pentameter

Introducing Iambic Pentameter | Reading Shakespeare: Curation | Scoop.it
Iambic pentameter is the meter that Shakespeare nearly always used when writing in verse. This guide tells you everything you need to know about iambic pentameter. Read on.
C Alford's insight:

This site provides the reader with a detailed definition and breakdown of iambic pentemeter.

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Teaching Shakespeare-Folger Shakespeare Library

Teaching Shakespeare-Folger Shakespeare Library | Reading Shakespeare: Curation | Scoop.it
C Alford's insight:

This is a series of educational podcasts which help with unlocking Shakespeare's language. The podcast titled "Is that your sandwich" is an excellent video which explains an in class activity to help teach students the importance of syllable and word emphasis in Shakespeare's texts.

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Hamlet: Novel Guide

Hamlet: Novel Guide | Reading Shakespeare: Curation | Scoop.it

This Novel Guide at classzone.com is helpful in creating an general layout for a unit. It includes theme openers, cross-curricular activities, and research assignments. All of these can make up the skeleton of the unit, so the lessons can be the meat built around it.


Via Madeline Northey
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Shakespeare Set Free

I have highlighted The Folger Shakespeare Library website many times on this curation page because of the many valuable resources they have. Recently I found out that The Folger Shakespeare Library resources include more than just the website. Shakespeare Set Free is a book published by The Folger Shakespeare Library. It has ideas on how to teach A Midsummer Night's Dream, MacBeth, and Romeo and Juliet. It includes many ways on how to teach with a performance based approach, which would be a great asset for a teacher to use in the classroom.


Via Madeline Northey
C Alford's insight:

This is a great online book to help guide teachers in their teaching of some of Shakespeare's plays

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How to Read Shakespeare Aloud

Shakespeare's plays were meant to be read aloud, and many scholars believe Shakespeare left specific clues to actors in his text. Learn some tips for reading...
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