Curating Trove
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The Glass House | Plan Your Visit

The Glass House | Plan Your Visit | Curating Trove | Scoop.it
The mission of the Philip Johnson Glass House is for the 47-acre campus to become a center-point and catalyst for the preservation of modern architecture, landscape, and art, and a canvas for inspiration, experimentation and cultivation honoring...
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From Pop Music to Blogging, Everyone's a Curator

From Pop Music to Blogging, Everyone's a Curator | Curating Trove | Scoop.it
Paola Antonelli chaired a salon panel of curatorial forces at the Museum of Modern Art, including Jeff Jarvis and Maria Popova.
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How soon is now?: Fellows Friday with Alicia Eggert | TED Blog

Artist Alicia Eggert uses words as found objects in her sculptural art -- a body of work that serves as an ongoing investigation of time.
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Kerry James Marshall :: JACK SHAINMAN GALLERY

Kerry James Marshall :: JACK SHAINMAN GALLERY | Curating Trove | Scoop.it
Kerry James Marshall
Home » Artists » Kerry James Marshall
About Kerry James Marshall
Kerry James Marshall was born in 1955 in Birmingham, Alabama, and was educated at the Otis Art Institute in Los Angeles, from which he received a BFA, and an honorary doctorate (1999). The subject matter of his paintings, installations, and public projects is often drawn from African-American popular culture, and is rooted in the geography of his upbringing: “You can’t be born in Birmingham, Alabama, in 1955 and grow up in South Central [Los Angeles] near the Black Panthers headquarters, and not feel like you’ve got some kind of social responsibility. You can’t move to Watts in 1963 and not speak about it. That determined a lot of where my work was going to go,” says Marshall. In his "Souvenir" series of paintings and sculptures, he pays tribute to the civil rights movement with mammoth printing stamps featuring bold slogans of the era (“Black Power!”) and paintings of middle-class living rooms, where ordinary African-American citizens have become angels tending to a domestic order populated by the ghosts of Martin Luther King, Jr., John F. Kennedy, Robert Kennedy, and other heroes of the 1960s. In "RYTHM MASTR," Marshall creates a comic book for the twenty-first century, pitting ancient African sculptures come to life against a cyberspace elite that risks losing touch with traditional culture. Marshall’s work is based on a broad range of art-historical references, from Renaissance painting to black folk art, from El Greco to Charles White. A striking aspect of Marshall’s paintings is the emphatically black skin tone of his figures—a development the artist says emerged from an investigation into the invisibility of blacks in America and the unnecessarily negative connotations associated with darkness. Marshall believes, “You still have to earn your audience’s attention every time you make something.” The sheer beauty of his work speaks to an art that is simultaneously formally rigorous and socially engaged. Marshall lives in Chicago.
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Njideka Akunyili

Njideka Akunyili | Curating Trove | Scoop.it
NJIDEKA AKUNYILI
My art addresses my internal tension between my deep love for Nigeria, my country of birth, and my strong appreciation for Western culture, which has profoundly influenced both my life and my art. I use my art as a way to negotiate my seemingly contradictory loyalties to both my cherished Nigerian culture that is currently eroding and to my white American husband. Most of the Nigerian traditions I experienced growing up are quickly disappearing due to the permeation of Western culture and the ensuing opinion that being ''too Nigerian'' is uncool. I feel dismayed by Nigerians' unquestioningly valuing anything Western as superior however, my awareness of this problem does not exempt me from it - indeed, I question whether this mentality played a part in my falling in love with my husband. My art serves as a vehicle through which I explore my conflicted allegiance to two separate cultures.
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Pierre David - Photos

Pierre David - Photos | Curating Trove | Scoop.it
Ce site présente le travail de Pierre David, plasticien, scénographe et designer This website shows Pierre David's work as an artist, a set designer and a designer...
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