Cultures, Customs and Communities - HSIE Stage 1
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ePals

ePals | Cultures, Customs and Communities - HSIE Stage 1 | Scoop.it

 ePals offers elementary and secondary school administrators, teachers, students and parents worldwide a safe and secure platform for building educational communities, providing quality digital content and facilitating collaboration for effective 21st century learning.

Erin McMurray's insight:

The ePals Global Community is an online resource for connecting with students and classrooms all over the world. It provides a safe digital platform for global collaboration and the sharing of knowledge, while also allowing both students and teachers to develop their technological skills and participate in active and experiential learning. (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, pp.144-147)

 

The ePals Global Community platform enables teachers to find classrooms from all over the world with shared interests, allowing for a rich online educational experience as the students get to interact with other students from across the globe. 

 

As a teacher, I think this would be an outstanding opportunity for students to connect with other students that they would have no way of knowing otherwise. For example, there are equivalent Stage 1 classes in England, the USA, Canada, the Philippines, India, Columbia etc all looking for other classes to work with. 

 

Students would be able to directly ask questions and share information about their own cultures, traditions and family groups, creating an extraordinarily rich and authentic learning experience. (Zyngier, 2008, p. 1773)

 

The use of Web 2.0 technologies by ePal would also be beneficial in developing my Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPCK) (Mishra & Koehler, 2006, pp. 1028-1029) and embedding good teaching practice in the classroom.

 

The nature of the ePal project platform would also lend itself nicely into a co-curricular English lesson, particularly Outcomes EN1-3A (using digital technologies), EN1-5A (spelling), EN1-7B (respond to and compose texts) and EN1-11D (expressing themselves).

 

References:

 

Australian Institute for Teaching and School Leadership (AITSL), (2012). NSW Australian Professional Standards for Teachers.

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B., (2011). Teaching society and environment. South Melbourne, Victoria: Cengage Learning.

 

Mishra, P. & Koehler, M.J. (2006). Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge: A framework for teacher knowledge. Teachers College Record, Vol 108, No 6, pp. 1017-1054.

 

NSW BOS (2013) English K-10 Syllabus.

 

NSW BOS (2006) Human Society and Its Environment Syllabus.

 

Zyngier, D., (2008). (Re)conceptualising student engagement: Doing education not doing time, Teaching and Teacher Education, 24, pp.1765–1776.

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Elders

Elders | Cultures, Customs and Communities - HSIE Stage 1 | Scoop.it
Celebrating Culture
Erin McMurray's insight:

It is important in HSIE to include Aboriginal and Torres Straight perspectives in the classroom. Celebrating Culture makes the suggestion of inviting local Elders and Community Leaders to school to facilitate learning - a great way to create an "authentic" learning experience (Hollins, 2011, pp. 395-396).

 

However, it is vital to ensure that any such visits are handled with due care and sensitivity. The NSW Board of Studies 'Working with Aboriginal Communities', in particular, Part 2.4, details the appropriate procedures that should be undertaken when considering approaching the local Aboriginal community. The NSW Aboriginal Education Consultative Group (NSW AECG) is suggested as an excellent first point of contact.

 

The proper foundations would also need to be laid with the students prior to any visit so that there are no misunderstandings or inadvertent offence caused (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 390). The ABC's Online Indigenous Interactive Map (http://www.abc.net.au/indigenous/map/) is an excellent resource for demonstrating the hugely varied Aboriginal language groups. A History of Aboriginal Sydney (http://www.historyofaboriginalsydney.edu.au/) also provides great background on local Sydney groups.

 

Celebrating Culture provides a several comprehensive worksheets, which have been developed in collaboration with several Aboriginal Elders, for use in the classroom and when talking to Elders or Community Leaders.

 

I think that inviting and Elder and/or Community Leaders into the classroom is a great way to develop student's understanding of different cultural groups, including their linguistic practices, symbols, traditions and community structure. It also fits nicely into meeting Standards 1.4.1 and 2.4.1 of the NSW Australian Professional Standards for Teachers.

 

References:

 

Australian Institute for Teaching and School Leadership (AITSL), (2012). NSW Australian Professional Standards for Teachers.

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B., (2011). Teaching society and environment. South Melbourne, Victoria: Cengage Learning.

 

Hollins, E.R., (2011). Teacher preparation for quality teaching. Journal of Teacher Education, 62(4), 395-407.

 

NSW BOS (2006). Human Society and Its Environment Syllabus.

 

NSW BOS (2008). Working with Aboriginal Communities: A guide to community consultation and protocols.

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Primary | Harmony Day

Primary | Harmony Day | Cultures, Customs and Communities - HSIE Stage 1 | Scoop.it

Harmony Day 21 March is a day of cultural respect for everyone who calls Australia home – from the traditional owners of this land to those who have come from many countries around the world.

Erin McMurray's insight:

Harmony Day is celebrated in Australia on March 21 each year as a day of cultural respect for all Australians. In 2014 the theme was "Everyone Belongs", which fits nicely into teaching CUS1.3 and CUS1.4. I would develop a Unit of Work around some of the ideas suggested on the Teacher Resources page:

- what is my family background and heritage?

- what groups do I belong to besides family? (school, friends, hobbies, religion etc)

 

These ideas would need be explored first in class (prior to Harmony Day) to ensure the students understand what is meant by belonging to different groups. It would also be an excellent opportunity for inquiry based and active learning (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, pp. 143-145; Hollins, 2011, pp. 395-396), whereby the students collaborate with each other in working out what groups they may or may not belong to.

 

After the initial class discussion, it would be up to the students to go home and talk to their family about their heritage and cultural practices. A worksheet to take home and fill out would likely be beneficial to ensure the students acquire the knowledge they need, including images taken from newspapers, magazines, online etc to be used in the next activity.

 

In class, the students would then use these images in conjunction with other arts materials to create individual collages to depict their understanding of their cultural heritage and the groups to which they belong. The next step that could then be taken would involve the class using these collages to identify their differences and similarities with their classmates.

 

This UOW would help the students understand the subject matter from Outcomes CUS1.3 and CUS1.4 (students will learn about the groups to which they belong, including family; students will learn about the significant people who belong to these groups). It would also help me achieve Standards 2.1.1 and 2.2.1 of the NSW Australian Professional Standards for Teachers in demonstrating my understanding and knowledge of the concepts, substance and structure needed to create effective teaching and learning sequences.

 

References:

 

Australian Institute for Teaching and School Leadership (AITSL), (2012). NSW Australian Professional Standards for Teachers.

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B., (2011). Teaching society and environment. South Melbourne, Victoria: Cengage Learning.

 

Hollins, E.R., (2011). Teacher preparation for quality teaching. Journal of Teacher Education, 62(4), 395-407.

 

NSW BOS (2006) Human Society and Its Environment Syllabus

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Stage 1 teaching resources

Stage 1 teaching resources | Cultures, Customs and Communities - HSIE Stage 1 | Scoop.it

China Downunder is a multistage HSIE teaching resource. The teacher’s book provides significant support for learning in Stages 1, 2 and 3. Detailed teaching notes, handouts and background information for Stage 1 are included. A class set of 30 booklets providing interesting and engaging images of contemporary China are also part of the resource.

Erin McMurray's insight:

This is an excellent free resource provided by the NSW Department of Education and Communities. The Teachers Book provides lesson ideas and plans that link explicitly to different curriculum outcomes as well as the two student image booklets.

 

Several thorough teaching ideas and lesson plans can be found on pages 17-20 of the Teachers Book, with several additional handouts following.

 

The 'Focus: family, community, Chinese/Australian contributions' activity would be an excellent way to achieve Outcomes CUS1.3 and CUS1.4 (students will learn about the groups to which they belong, including family; students will learn about the significant people who belong to these groups). Through class discussion and comparison, mapping, illustration and questioning students will identify the things that make them culturally diverse, along with cultural similarities. This understanding is vital in students developing their understanding of culture and identity. (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, pp. 295-299)

 

The Family Comparison Chart is an excellent way to help achieve this, whereby students begin by completing a worksheet detailing their own family's practices, before a whole class chart is completed. A class map could also then be made, where students label their family countries of origin. There is also scope for students to bring to class something that is important to their family and/or culture, such as an item of clothing, a religious object, a photograph, a flag etc, which can then be presented to the class, linking with Outcome EN1-6B (English K-10 Syllabus). This would form the basis of assessment to show the student's understanding of family and cultural diversity.

 

The China Down Under resources would be helpful for me to achieve Standards 3.1.1 and 3.2.1 of the NSW Australian Professional Standards for Teachers in developing my knowledge in  setting appropriate learning tasks for students of varying abilities and planning lesson sequences.

 

References:

 

Australian Institute for Teaching and School Leadership (AITSL), (2012). NSW Australian Professional Standards for Teachers.

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B., (2011). Teaching society and environment. South Melbourne, Victoria: Cengage Learning.

 

NSW BOS (2013) English K-10 Syllabus.

 

NSW BOS (2006) Human Society and Its Environment Syllabus.

 

 

 

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Who are the families of the world | Global Education

Who are the families of the world | Global Education | Cultures, Customs and Communities - HSIE Stage 1 | Scoop.it

Students examine descriptions, photos and data to deepen their understanding of the diversity of families throughout the world. They develop an appreciation of the diversity of roles and recognise how families have changed over time.

Erin McMurray's insight:

It is important for children to gain understanding of cultures other than their own. Global Education provides many helpful resources for teachers. 'Activity 3: Families that work together' would be a useful resource for teaching students about how families from other countries may live very differently to Australian families.

 

The video suggested, 'A Day in the Life of Lucy' (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-aQVQbGDojo), tells the story of the daily life of a 9 year old girl from Uganda. It shows Lucy sharing a small mud house with her 10 family members, fetching water over a long distance, helping her adoptive mother prepare food, playing with her siblings as well as helping care for them. The video depicts a very different way of life from the average Australian child.

 

This video is an excellent resource for helping students understand about different families in the world and developing their visual literacy (Groundwater-Smith, Ewing & Le Cornu, 2006, p. 144). The activities suggested by Global Education to accompany the video would help children define those differences, as well as identifying similarities.  This activity also has strong links to Outcome EN1-11D (English K-10 Syllabus) in that the students would be responding to a digital text and discussing their own community as well as the wider world.

 

As a teacher, it is important to keep the phases of learning (Schellens and Valcke, 2005, p. 962) in mind when presenting this video and the subsequent Global Education activities. It is likely that the information in the video would be new for most Stage 1 students, so it is important to take the time to work through the phases so that the students gain a fuller comprehension of the different family groups.

 

This aligns with Standards 1.1.1 and 1.2.1 of the NSW Australian Professional Standards for Teachers. 

 

References:

 

Australian Institute for Teaching and School Leadership (AITSL), (2012). NSW Australian Professional Standards for Teachers.

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B., (2011). Teaching society and environment. South Melbourne, Victoria: Cengage Learning.

 

Groundwater-Smith, S., Ewing, R., and Le Cornu, R., (2006). Teaching: Challenges and Dilemmas (3rd edition). South Melbourne: Thomson.

 

NSW BOS (2006) Human Society and Its Environment Syllabus.

 

Schellens, T. & Valcke, M. (2005). Collaborative learning in asynchronous discussion groups: What about the impact on cognitive processing? Computers in Human Behavior, 21, 957-975.

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