Culture of Afghanistan -" A Thousand Splendid Suns"
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Culture of Afghanistan -" A Thousand Splendid Suns"
The culture in Afghanistan is rich with history, and intrigue.
Curated by Adam Mansour
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Afghan Girls Attend School

Afghan Girls Attend School | Culture of Afghanistan -" A Thousand Splendid Suns" | Scoop.it
Adam Mansour's insight:

It is truly sad to see that this is the current state of the schools that girls are in. It is amazing to see them have the oppirtunity to learn after years of being told they must remain within the home. Even so the current quality of their "schools" is something that needs to be changed. 

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Rise Of The Taliban

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This article describes the history of Afghanistan and the eventual rise of the Taliban. Afghanistan began as a territory ruled by multiple kingdoms. Later on Islam was brought to the region which then became the biggest influence on society. Afghanistan lost two wars against Britain and was a territory under their rule until 1907 when Britain and Russia allowed to let it stand as an independent nation. Afghanistan had a government set up with a monarchy until 1973 when the kings cousin Muhammad Daoud Khan overthrew him. Later Russia came to the region to end the dictatorship which led to the rise of the Mujahideen. Once Russia had left there were still multiple militant faction of the war present. The Taliban came to exist because Pakistan sent students in the early 1990's to bring religion and calm to the country. This group ended up using an extreme and incorrectly interpreted version of the Koran and created it into the system of laws.

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Afghanistan-Human Rights

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This article discusses the punishment of men and women in Afghanistan under Taliban rule. The main point of interest is the section that focuses on the treatment of women. Women are not allowed to practice medicine, and a man is not allowed to treat a female. This means that women are pretty much denied any form of healthcare. The laws are severe and harsh which can lead to being stoned to death. Men also meet with some adversity, men must grow a beard. Disobeying these laws can lead to execution.There is a high amount of cultural tension. there is an ethnic
 divide between Pashtun's (the majority) and Hazara's (minority). there isalso high poverty and starvation. The life expectancy in this region is only 46. It stands as a shocking thing to hear since in America our expectancy is 78. Thats an average of almost 30 years more of life. It stand out to me as a shock and a truly fascinating aspect of this region. 

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Snow Flower and the Secret Fan

Snow Flower and the Secret Fan | Culture of Afghanistan -" A Thousand Splendid Suns" | Scoop.it
In a remote Hunan county in 19th century China, a seven-year-old girl is paired with a laotong or "old same," an emotional match to last a lifetime.
Adam Mansour's insight:

I would want to read this book becasue it shows womens suffering in another region. It also deals with the idea of an arranged marriage. It has a lot of similarities to A Thousand Splendid Suns but through a different culture.

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Map

Map | Culture of Afghanistan -" A Thousand Splendid Suns" | Scoop.it
Adam Mansour's insight:

This is a map of Afghanistan and it is a country that I would not reccomend to visit. This is a country that is in need of true humanitarian releif. This country is known for mistreatment of women, and ignorance to human rights. The laws are an extremist view of Islam. This has created a hostile and dangerous region. 

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Culture

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This article by Kwintessential.com covers the culture and outline of Afghan life. It describes Islam and the commitments that it requires; praying five times a day, and fasting during the month of Ramadan. It also breaks down the tribal representation. It also describes a strong value for family. The article describes the marriage practice of a son living within the same home as his parents once he is married. It also states that women do all of the housework while men are seen to be the breadwinners. The culture also has high regard to honor and sees it as the mans duty to protect the honor of the family. The people are also generous and will offer you anything they have when you are invited over which relates back to the importance of honor. Women are not to talk to men. It is seen as dishonor if a man speaks to a women whom he is not related to.


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Alex Mullany's comment, December 13, 2012 12:07 PM
Intriguing..
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Campaigners fear sinister forces are behind sudden rise of women

Adam Mansour's insight:

I find this article to be truly amazing and fascinating. It decribes the corruption of the government in Afghanistan, but what holds the strongest resonance to me is the fact that there are now women in the parliament of Afghanistan. 

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I have a right to | BBC World Service

Between 1996 and 2001, under the Taleban, the educational situation in Afghanistan worsened. The school curriculum was restricted, schools were destroyed and Afghan females were banned from all educational life.
Adam Mansour's insight:

In Afghanistan there is a low rate of education. Education is a huge issue in this country. There is a low literacy rate and education is often not pressured on children. A large sum of this can be attributed to the influence of the Taliban. The statistics of this reality is truly sdhocking and terrifying. 2/3 boys and 9/10 girls do not attend schools. As an American child this is unhueard of. This is a central issue that contributes to the struggle of the Afghan people. Without education scoiety loses any sense of structure.

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Girls' education in Afghanistan :: News from the Field :: Media Center :: U.S. Fund for UNICEF - UNICEF USA

Girls' education in Afghanistan :: News from the Field :: Media Center :: U.S. Fund for UNICEF - UNICEF USA | Culture of Afghanistan -" A Thousand Splendid Suns" | Scoop.it
These days, it takes more than textbooks and pencils to be a schoolgirl in Afghanistan—it also takes tremendous bravery and tenacity.
Adam Mansour's insight:

It is truly amazing to see that girls are now able to attend schools. Even though these girls meet with a lot of adversity and difficulty becasue of this, it still shwos that there is hope for the region. 

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A Thousand Splendid Suns: Khaled Hosseini: Amazon.com: Kindle Store

A Thousand Splendid Suns: Khaled Hosseini: Amazon.com: Kindle Store
Adam Mansour's insight:

In Khaled Hossein's novel "A Thousand Splendid Suns" he discusses the life of a bastard child in Afghanistan. He introduces the novel with Mariam living in the outskirts of Herat with her mother Nana. The reader learns that she got pregnant from a wealthy business man named Jalil. Mariam walks into town and tries to become a part of her father's life. He ends up ignoring her and when he has a driver send Mariam home she finds Nana hanging from a tree. this forces Mariam to have to lifve with Jalil and his wives. To get rid of Mariam Jalil marries her off to an associate of his. this marriage proves to be difficult especially when Mariam cannot bear a child for her husband Rasheed. later on a friend of Mariam's stays with them and Rasheed decides it would be wise to marry her as well. Mariam and Laila end up having a level of jealousy between each other. Rasheed however grows to be more abusive and as a result Mariam kills him. In doing so she goes to jail but this allows Laila the freedom to marry the man she loves, a boy named Tariq.

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The Last Soviet In Afghanistan (RT Documentary)

An ex-Soviet soldier in Afghanistan hasn't returned to the motherland in more than 25 years. He remembers 1983 like it was yesterday: It was the height of th...
Adam Mansour's insight:

This video follows a former soviet soldier living in Afghanistan. He became a prisoner of war and has lived in Afghanistan for almost 30 years. He has built a family and adopted the religion. Also he has the chance to return home for the first time since he was deployed in 1983. It is interesting to see the way that the war changed his life and the aftermath that it had on soviet soldiers. I thought it was interesting to reflect on how his life could have been had the soviets won the war. When he returns to Poland he finds himself as an outsider and gets criticism from many people he once called friends. The most interesting aspect is how he so easily changed his life to be the life of an Afghan Muslim.

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