HSIE S1 { Expressing Culture }
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About | HSIE S1 { Expressing Culture } | Scoop.it
Weijing Serafina Lin's insight:

This collection of resources are created to explore the similarities and differences between ways in which families express their culture, which comes under the NSW HSIE Syllabus outcome CUS1.3: identifies customs, practices, symbols, languages and traditions of their family and other families.

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2. Multiculturalism and Diversity

2. Multiculturalism and Diversity | HSIE S1 { Expressing Culture } | Scoop.it
Resources that foucs on the topic of multiculturalism and diversity. Includes professional articles and resources, lesson plans, and activities.
Weijing Serafina Lin's insight:

The Scholastic website offers free lesson plans, articles and resources suitable for students from primary up to high school. Simply type keywords into the search bar, and an array of useful resources will be summoned. This resource is an example of the type of materials teachers can find on the website, which comprises of a collection of articles and lesson plans focused on teaching multiculturalism and diversity. A limitation of the website is that it is American-based, therefore some of the content may need to be adjusted and proof-read before it is used in the Australian classroom.



{TEACHING IDEA}

A teaching idea inspired by one of the lesson plans in the resource is to organise a day where members of students’ families are invited to the classroom to share games from their culture (See ‘Games Around the World’ for details). This will not only help students to identify activities practiced by people from another culture, it will also provide the opportunity for a first hand experience on how families express their culture through entertainment. Moyles (2012) states that a recent US research have confirmed not only do children learn by doing, play is the child’s preferred mode of learning. Thus this activity will invigorate students’ knowledge and experience of cultural diversity through their preferred learning mode.


In addition, there are strong evidence on the positive influence of parental involvement in children’s education including school achievement, learning motivation, perseverance and social behaviour (Menheere & Hooge, 2010). Since parents or other members of the family will be contributing directly to the construction of students’ knowledge, teachers may need to invest additional time to communicate with parents to ensure a clear, concise and coherent approach to delivering the knowledge. It may be preferred that the family members invited are from different cultural backgrounds, this is so that students are exposed to a wider variety of traditional games. Keeping these aspects in mind, this task may require some planning ahead of time.



{ASSESSMENT IDEA}

Students may be asked to create their own ‘game cards’, where they can draw and write about the steps to a traditional game they have explored during the session. They should be encouraged to write down a similar game in another culture on the side. The completed game card can be incorporated into the classroom as play time resources.



{LITERACY STRATEGY}

EN1-8B Recognises that there are different kinds of texts when reading and viewing and shows an awareness of purpose, audience and subject matter.

Prior to the assessment portion of the lesson, it is preferable for students to be introduced to informative texts, so that they are familiarised with the type of language and structure that are used to compose procedural texts and serve its purpose. An activity could be a role play on cooking, where students will come to contact with procedural texts by reading recipes.



{REFERENCES}

1. Menheere, A. & Hooge, E. H. (2010). Parental involvement in children’s education: A review study about the effect of parental involvement on children’s school education with a focus on the position of illiterate parents. Retrieved April 6th, 2014 from http://tinyurl.com/pun3uzr.

2. Moyles, J. (2012). A-Z of play in early childhood. Retrieved April 6th, 2014 from http://tinyurl.com/o9alr6r.


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4. Aboriginal Symbols Glossary (Aboriginal Perspective)

4. Aboriginal Symbols Glossary (Aboriginal Perspective) | HSIE S1 { Expressing Culture } | Scoop.it
Weijing Serafina Lin's insight:

The Central Art Aboriginal Art Store is a web store that showcases Aboriginal artworks from well established and emerging Aboriginal artists. The concept of a web store should not deteriorate the value of this resource, as outstanding respect towards the Aboriginal art form is strongly evident on the webpage. All of the artworks on the website are created by Aboriginal Australians, and are issued with a Certificate of Provenance. The diversity of Indigenous societies are acknowledged on the resource, and informations on the artworks were created with high levels of Aboriginal participation.


This website contains a wealth of fascinating Aboriginal artworks, along with details about the artwork and the artist. A strong sense of appreciation and advocacy for the unique and sacred nature of Aboriginal artworks is evident on the website. This particular resource outlines the meanings of various Aboriginal symbols used in Aboriginal paintings, which illustrates the distinct way Aboriginal people express their culture through art.



{TEACHING IDEA}

Use the Pirla Warna Warna (http://www.aboriginalartstore.com.au/artists/malcolm-maloney-jagamarra/pirla-warna-warna) painting as a stimulus, allow students to decode the image with the help of the resource. Students are encouraged to learn about the meaning behind the artwork, as well as information on the artist for the purpose of expanding their knowledge on Aboriginal Australians and culture. Students can then create their own Aboriginal style artwork by using some of the symbols identified in the resource. As Moyles (2012) highlights in her work, it is through doing that children acquire understanding.


People have been using art as a way of understanding the human spirit throughout human history, as it is a form of expression (Lombardi, 2014). Therefore, by adapting to the Aboriginal art form, students will learn about how Aboriginal people express their culture through art, as well as to encourage the appreciation of the Aboriginal art form, and establish a greater understanding about Aboriginal art and artists.



{ASSESSMENT IDEA}

Students may be asked to present their artwork to the class, and talk about the Aboriginal symbols they have used, what they like about using Aboriginal symbols in their artwork, and a difference and similarity between painting using Aboriginal symbols versus the conventional symbols that they use. For a fun twist, this can be done through a role play, where students take on the role of being a renowned artist to discuss their latest work with the press.



{LITERACY STRATEGY}

EN1-1A Communicates with a range of people in informal and guided activities demonstrating interaction skills and considers how own communication is adjusted in different situations.

Prior to the assessment, teachers should use the opportunity to help students practice communication skills in different situations. For instance, in the context of this assessment, students should recognise that they will need to use a different mode of speech when they are speaking in the role of a renowned artist.



{REFERENCES}

1. Lombardi, R. (2014). Art therapy. In E. J. Green & A. A. Drewes (Ed.), Integrating Expressive Arts and Play Therapy with Children and Adolescents. New Jersey, Johb Wiley & Sons, Inc.

2. Moyles, J. (2012). A-Z of play in early childhood. Retrieved April 6th, 2014 from http://tinyurl.com/o9alr6r.


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1. Skwirk

Weijing Serafina Lin's insight:

Skwirk is an online education program that provides teachers with an extensive range of teaching resources including detailed background information on different topics, and interactive tools to enhance student learning. This particular resource from the program can be accessed free of charge, and is designed based on the Stage 1 HSIE content. It is well organised, informative and visually stimulating, which makes it an enticing resource for Stage 1 classrooms. The resource is easy to use and comprehend, thus appropriate to be used for individual or collaborative learning.



{TEACHING IDEA}

Berger and Thomas (2011) argues that digital education without the active involvement of an educator can marginalise students rather than engage them in meaningful ways, this statement calls for Teacher-Directed Learning (TDL) when pupil are engaged in learning through digital sources. While this resource has the potential to enhance knowledge, it is not preferable to be used alone. Hence, prior to using the resource, a stimulus text such as a picturebook about a particular culture’s celebration should be introduced as the foundation for the scaffolding of knowledge that will occur later in the session (Some picturebook recommendations can be found on http://www.whatdowedoallday.com/2013/11/multicultural-christmas-books-kids.html).


On the other hand, Williams’ (2013) work has found that visual educational resources are powerful tools to enliven the classroom and enrich the learning experience. The “Celebrations” section found on this resource not only ties in seamlessly with the CUS1.3 outcome, it also offers the option to view the information through animations or written texts. Since it is condensed with information, students may be asked to inquire into one particular category of celebration through Self-Directed Learning (SDL), which is elicited when they take on the role of selecting information that they want to explore. SDL used in combination with TDL is believed to facilitate the process of intrinsically motivated learning, which is highly valued (Gibbons, 2002). While it can be entertaining for students to play with the interactive features on the resource, the activity needs to be highly supported to avoid disengagement from the task.



{ASSESSMENT IDEA}

As a class, students may be presented with images of various cultures celebrating different holidays/events. Students can be asked to identify the culture and celebration depicted in the image, and compare how other cultures celebrate the same holiday/event. They may do this together as a class, or in the form of ‘think-pair-share’ with a partner.



{LITERACY STRATEGY}

EN1-4A Draws on an increasing range of skills and strategies to fluently read, view and comprehend a range of texts on less familiar topics in different media and technologies.

Students may be asked to discuss about the similarities and differences between the texts i.e. the picturebook and the interactive resource. This exercise will help students to realise different ways information is conveyed, as well as developing their skills to comprehend information on different medias.



{REFERENCES}

1. Berger, T. & Thomas, M. (2011). Integrating digital technologies in education: A model for negotiating change and resistance to change. In M. Thomas (Ed.), Digital education. New York, Palgrave Macmillan.

2. Gibbons, M. (2002). The self-directed learning handbook: challenging adolescent students to excel. Retrieved April 6th, 2014 from http://opac.library.usyd.edu.au:80/record=b3906049~S1.

3. Williams, G. (2013). Harnessing visual educational resources to better realise pedagogical objectives. In C. Yvonne & F. Margaret (Ed.), Digital literacies in education. Oxford, PA: Peter Lang AG.


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3. Difference Differently

3. Difference Differently | HSIE S1 { Expressing Culture } | Scoop.it
Weijing Serafina Lin's insight:

Difference Differently is an Australian-based interactive online resource that explores diversity. It is aligned with the Australian Curriculum, and offers modules in English, History, Geography, and Civics and Citizenship for students in Years 3-10. The resource offers unique and interesting lesson ideas for exploring diversity. Although it is not suitable for direct use in Stage 1 classrooms, with some adjustments, teachers can still utilise the resource to create an effective lesson.



{TEACHING IDEA}

In the beginning of the session, the teacher will draw on students’ prior knowledge and experience of wedding ceremonies as a basis for the comparison that will occur later in the session. The “Three Weddings” section from the resource explores how Indian, Cambodian and Jewish cultures celebrate weddings. These videos creates a virtual experience for students to participate in three culturally distinct traditions, which is very insightful. The Victoria Department of Education and Training (2003) believes that developing multiliteracy skills is pivotal in the contemporary classroom. This activity gives students an opportunity to practice and develop their multiliteracy skills, as they begin to deconstruct information by making connections to the use of sound effects, and visual representations.



{ASSESSMENT IDEA}

After viewing the video, a class discussion about the similarities and differences between weddings amongst different cultures should be conducted as a consolidation activity. The teacher should create a table to record the responses, so that students can refer to the information in the following task. Students may then be asked to compose a short writing about a particular culture’s wedding other than their own. In this writing, they should write down an area of similarity and difference between their own wedding knowledge/experience and the virtual wedding of their choice.



{LITERACY STRATEGY}

EN1-9B Uses basic grammatical features, punctuation conventions and vocabulary appropriate to the type of text when responding to and composing texts.

Teachers should take this opportunity to strengthen students’ ability in composing texts using appropriate grammar, punctuation and vocabulary. Students may use this opportunity to practice their comparative writing. The spellings to some unfamiliar words specific to the corresponding cultures should be listed in a visible space for children to refer to in their writing.

 

 

{REFERENCES}

1. Victoria Department of Education and Training. (2003). Multiliteracies: considering multiliteracies. Australia: Schools’ Television Victoria. [Accessed June 3rd, 2012, from New Learning website http://newlearningonline.com/multiliteracies/videos/.]

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5. Our Many Identities (Global Perspective)

5. Our Many Identities (Global Perspective) | HSIE S1 { Expressing Culture } | Scoop.it
Weijing Serafina Lin's insight:

The Global Education website is a fantastic resource that offers great teaching materials across the Australian curriculum. All the resources offered on this website are created to encourage a global perspective across the curriculum. This particular resource explores issues of identity, cultural diversity, social justice and human rights within the Stage 1 context. A set of effective activity plans can be found, along with valuable sources that  teachers can embed in their own lesson plans.



{TEACHING IDEA}

As suggested by Activity 2 from the resource, students can view to the set of ‘I am...’ images to create a discussion on their own interpretation of the pictures and captions. They will then create their own ‘I am’ sentence by reflecting on the the discussion and applying it to their own experiences. Teachers can help to provoke student responses by questioning how they are similar or different to the pupils from the images. Through this exercise, students will realise that although communities around the world may take on similar roles, the way these roles are expressed can be very different. This activity will elicit students’ multiliteracy comprehension, which is encouraged in the contemporary classroom (Victoria Department of Education and Training, 2003).

 

Leading up to the assessment, students may view the introduction to the film “Our Day Project” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FaBln7ITO3A from 0:00-2:22) which showcases a day in the life of children from different cultures around the world. This video is simple and highly effective in illustrating the commonalities and differences as it contains a medley of customs from distinct cultures such as Australia and Cambodia; however an abundance of support and links to students’ prior knowledge is crucial. As Axford (2009) strongly professed, a high challenge and high support environment is critical for optimal learning. Since this task may be considerably challenging especially for Year 1 students, teachers need to organise adequate support if it is to be used in the classroom.



{ASSESSMENT IDEA}

A fun idea for assessment is for the class to make short video clips of a snippet of their own life like the video. Working in small groups, students can branch their ideas from their ‘I am’ sentences and portray the concept through movement. This task will not only help teachers to assess students’ understanding on this topic, the final product will also act as a stimulus for students to reflect on their learning and understanding.



{LITERACY STRATEGY}

EN1-10C Thinks imaginatively and creatively about familiar topics, ideas and texts when responding to and composing texts.

The literacy strategy of this teaching idea can be embedded into the task itself, as students will need to think creatively about how they can present an idea through visual communication, which ties in with the development of multiliteracies skills mentioned earlier.



{REFERENCES}

1. Axford, B. (2009). Scaffolding Literacy: An Integrated and Sequential Approach to Teaching Reading, Spelling and Writing. Retrieved April 6th, 2014 from http://opac.library.usyd.edu.au:80/record=b4649665~S1.

2. Victoria Department of Education and Training. (2003). Multiliteracies: considering multiliteracies. Australia: Schools’ Television Victoria. [Accessed June 3rd, 2012, from New Learning website http://newlearningonline.com/multiliteracies/videos/.]

 

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