Culture Collapse Disorder
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Culture Collapse Disorder
Culture Collapse Disorder
Culture Collapse Disorder: The loss & destruction of home (places & planet) due to human impact and our modern consumer mindset
Curated by Bonnie Bright
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Carl Jung on Wonder and Gratitude

Carl Jung on Wonder and Gratitude | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

“If our religion is based on salvation, our chief emotions will be fear and trembling. If our religion is based on wonder, our chief emotion will be gratitude.” ~C.G. Jung

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The Earth Has a Soul: C.G. Jung on Nature, Technology & Modern Life by Meredith Sabini

The Earth Has a Soul: C.G. Jung on Nature, Technology & Modern Life by Meredith Sabini | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

Restoring Nature's Divinity
“Matter in the wrong place is dirt. People get dirty through too much civilization. Whenever we touch nature, we get clean.” 

You may not associate such bold, earthy sentiments with Swiss psychiatrist C.G. Jung, but he was, in fact, deeply concerned over the loss of connection with nature. He considered natural life to be the “nourishing soil of the soul.”  Who has time for a natural life these days? What would it look like if we did? Those of us destined to live through this turbulent period of history, the declining phase of Western civilization, could perhaps use a wise elder who stands slightly outside the modern world yet knows it well enough to offer guidance.

 

Jung shows the knowledge of an historian who understands how the dissociation from nature came about; he reaches out with the empathy of a healer who shares our plight; and he advises with the common sense of a country doctor how to live “in modest harmony with nature...(Click title for more)

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Memory, Place and Story: How Connection to Land Connects us to Self

Memory, Place and Story: How Connection to Land Connects us to Self | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

Some would argue our contemporary consumer-based, productivity-oriented culture contributes to a collective loss of memory—done of being connected to something larger than our everyday selves. As a society, we have become dislocated in time and disconnected from place, leaving us rootless, transient, and opting for sensationalism instead of spirituality; superficiality instead of soul.

 

So much of this malady is due to our disconnect from nature, our bodies, and earth itself. We are no longer grounded in something real that gives us context to understand how our lives play out in a fabric of being, a pattern in living nature with a self-organizing intelligence of its own.

 

As Jung put it, 

“Man feels isolated in the cosmos. He is no longer involved in nature and has lost his emotional participation in natural events, which hitherto had symbolic meaning for him. Thunder is no longer the voice of...(click title for more)

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Minna Kilpeläinen's curator insight, April 3, 2013 5:00 PM

There are very few places in the world for me that make you feel so alive than Grand Canyon.  I can imagine why some people want to get married with places and buildings.

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Jungian Ecopsychology: A Jungian Perspective on the Most Important Issue of Our Time—Climate Change

Jungian Ecopsychology: A Jungian Perspective on the Most Important Issue of Our Time—Climate Change | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

As Bill Clinton might say, “It's the environment, stupid!” Our devotion to science, technology and the capitalist system has culminated in a unique moment in the human relationship with the environment. Our species is at or near the peak of a prosperity bubble about to burst. We have exceeded the carrying capacity of the biosphere and we are still breeding.

 

(1) We are overusing antibiotics and deadly bacteria are becoming immune to everything we have.

 

(2) We are mining our precious water resources

 

(3), coral reefs are dying as the oceans become warmer and more acidic

 

(4), and most alarming, we are experiencing this as the very beginnings of the negative consequences of climate change. It will include massive droughts and floods, freak storms, the spread of diseases

 

(5), famine, water wars

 

(6), and the elimination of 30 to 50% of the species.

 

(7) Experts tell us we may have but 10 years max to turn the Titanic around with regard to the most devastating aspects of climate change.

 

(8) The apocalyptic conditions we are inexorably moving towards are truly in the archetypal domain, requiring an archetypal analysis and suggestions for dealing with it. Enter Jungian ecopsychology, a topic... (Click title to continue)

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Climate on the Couch

Climate on the Couch | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

Examining the psychological task of change, Mary-Jayne Rust looks at the ways in which we respond to the environmental crisis. How do old stories underlie our present reality?

 

While few people would now deny the reality of climate change and environmental crisis, many are still turning a blind eye to the situation we face. We are having great difficulty in making even the simplest of changes to our lives. The global scale of our crisis is overwhelming and it is easy to feel apathetic in response. This is made easier when our consumer lifestyles keep us well within our comfort zones.

When we do allow ourselves to feel, we might find a whole range of strong emotions, such as anxiety and fear about the future, despair at our lack of political will, grief for so many losses, guilt that we continue to be part of the cause, and more. While therapy has helped many of us to become more emotionally literate interpersonally, we are still a very stiff-upper-lip culture in relation to the bigger picture; when we block out our feelings, we lose touch with the urgency of crisis.

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Laura M. Smith's curator insight, May 17, 2014 9:39 AM

How do we move beyond the human skin to reclaim the vastness of our self?

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The Role and Value of Dreams in a Post-Apocalyptic Future -- by Paco Mitchell

The Role and Value of Dreams in a Post-Apocalyptic Future -- by Paco Mitchell | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

We are living in an age widely regarded as “apocalyptic,” though many of us steadfastly try to keep the lid on our share of apocalyptic awareness. But, in the end, it is better to lift the lid and peer into the cauldron. Every therapist understands this, and every patient should as well. And the most direct way of seeing into the living darkness that surrounds us is through our dreams.

 

My approach to depth psychology has been conditioned by one particular passage from Jung, the first example of his writing I had ever seen. When I first read this quote, in 1972, the words burned into my imagination like tongues of flame:

 

Anyone who wants to know the human psyche will learn next to nothing from experimental psychology. He would be better advised to abandon exact science, put away his scholar’s gown, bid farewell to his study, and wander with human heart through the world. There, in the horrors of prisons, lunatic asylums and... (click title for more)

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The Depth of Global Warming

The Depth of Global Warming | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

“… all unconscious functioning has the automatic character of an instinct, … [which] … because of [its] compulsiveness, … may positively endanger the life of the individual. As against this, consciousness enables [one] to adapt in an orderly way and to check the instincts, and consequently it cannot be dispensed with.”

C.G. Jung (CW 8, par. 412)

 

Looking out on the world today can cause one tremendous anxiety. Just this past week new studies were released indicating that we are putting more carbon dioxideinto the atmosphere than previous years and that the current rate at which the world is warming is unprecedented. Rate of warming is significant, because it effects how readily life can adapt to change. Since the rate... Click title for more

 

 

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