Culture Collapse Disorder
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Culture Collapse Disorder
Culture Collapse Disorder
Culture Collapse Disorder: The loss & destruction of home (places & planet) due to human impact and our modern consumer mindset
Curated by Bonnie Bright
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Earth Democracy and the Rights of Mother Earth - Vandana Shiva

Earth Democracy and the Rights of Mother Earth - Vandana Shiva | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

The collapse of Wall Street in September 2008 and the continuing financial crisis signal the end of the paradigm that put fictitious finance above real wealth created by nature and humans. This paradigm — which put profits above people, and corporations above citizens — can only be kept afloat with limitless bailouts that direct public wealth to private rescue instead of using it to rejuvenate nature and produce economic livelihoods for people. It can only be kept afloat with increasing violence to the earth and people.

 

It can only be kept alive as an economic dictatorship. This is clear in India’s heartland, where the limitless appetite for steel and aluminum for the global consumer economy and the limitless appetite for corporate profits are clashing head on with the rights of tribal communities to their land and homes, their forests and rivers, their cultures and ways of life. Tribal groups are saying a loud and clear “no” to their forced uprooting.

 

The only way to get to the minerals and coal that feed the “limitless growth” model in the face of democratic resistance is the use of militarized violence against tribal people. Operation “Green Hunt” has been launched in the tribal areas of India with precisely this purpose, even though the proclaimed objective is to clear out the “Maoists.” Under Operation Green Hunt, more than 40,000 armed paramilitary forces have been placed in the tribal areas that are rich in minerals and where tribal unrest is growing...

 

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We Are All Facing Extinction - Susan Griffin

We Are All Facing Extinction - Susan Griffin | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
We live in a society that pits the needs of human beings against nature.

 

In fact we are all faced with extinction. Along with forests, animals, and countless life forms, if we do not address climate change quickly, we will simply perish. Yet our awareness has been blunted. The same corporate mindset that places our welfare in conflict with the earth is also denying the gravity as well as the human causes of global warming. In complicity, too many governments and international institutions all over the world have been far too slow in responding to what becomes daily apparent to scientists as a grave danger.

 

One of the difficulties the movement to address climate change faces is that we are living in a society that is dissociated from nature in countless ways. With so many people living in cities or paved-over suburbs, often spending the great part of their lives in front of a computer screen or a television or on as assembly line in factory with no windows, the reality of our surroundings and... (Click title for more)

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Living in the Borderland: The Evolution of Consciousness and the Challenge of Healing Trauma--Jerome Bernstein

Living in the Borderland: The Evolution of Consciousness and the Challenge of Healing Trauma--Jerome Bernstein | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

In facing the crises of the twenty-first century, we need, more than ever, works such as Jerome Bernstein's remarkable and prophetic Living in the Borderland. This book enables us to believe in the possibility that our disastrous western culture can be healed.

 

For Living in the Borderland is one of those rare texts that is so deeply immersed in a lifetime of clinical practice and research that it transcends boundaries between disciplines, between social groups and even between humans and nature. Bernstein demonstrates that the borderland, of consciousness, of cultures, of so-called 'sanity', of the margins cultivated between nature and human, is a place of potential redemption.

 

In so doing, Living in the Borderland shifts the foundations of western epistemology in favour of restitution to native repressed cultures such as the Navajo. It fosters postcolonial justice, clinical revolution and the glorious possibility of saving the planet from the dominant group's predilection for species suicide... (click title for more)

 

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Maintaining Mental Health In The Age Of Madness, By Carolyn Baker

Maintaining Mental Health In The Age Of Madness, By Carolyn Baker | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

The World Health Organization defines mental health as “a state of well-being in which every individual realizes his or her own potential, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and fruitfully, and is able to make a contribution to her or his community.” A state of well-being is obviously more than just the absence of disease. It assumes that a human being is reasonably functional mentally, physically, emotionally, and spiritually. Similarly, this definition can be applied to healthy communities with the addition of social functionality as another aspect of well-being.

 

However, most readers are aware of the decline in mental health treatment within the past three decades. Whereas thirty years ago many working people had insurance benefits for outpatient psychotherapy as well as in-patient treatment, not only have the benefits dramatically decreased, but massive unemployment makes it virtually impossible for.. (click title for more)

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Amazon Indians unite against Canadian oil giant

Amazon Indians unite against Canadian oil giant | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

Amazon Indians from Peru and Brazil have joined together to stop a Canadian oil company destroying their land and threatening the lives of uncontacted tribes.

 

Hundreds of Matsés Indians gathered on the border of Peru and Brazil last Saturday and called on their governments to stop the exploration, warning that the work will devastate their forest home. (Click title for more)

 

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Chief Arvol Looking Horse | Ecocide Alert

Chief Arvol Looking Horse | Ecocide Alert | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

Chief Arvol Looking Horse, Lakota, with a Council of Indigenous Elders and Medicine Peoples, issued a statement saying mankind can no longer ignore the teachings to protect the Earth. The Indigenous Council described the destruction that has been created by man and is now out of control, including Fukushima and fracking in North America.

 

In a second statement, Amnesty International said Canada is to blame for the violations of international laws and human rights which resulted in a police attack on Mi’kmaq in a peaceful anti-fracking camp where Mi’kmaqs were defending their land.

 

In the first statement, the Indigenous Council said... (Click title for more)

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Indigenous tribes say effects of climate change already felt in Amazon rainforest

Indigenous tribes say effects of climate change already felt in Amazon rainforest | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
Tribal groups in Earth's largest rainforest are already being affected by shifts wrought by climate change, reports a paper published last week in the British journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B.

 

  

Tribal groups in Earth's largest rainforest are already being affected by shifts wrought by climate change, reports a paper published last week in the British journalPhilosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B.

The paper, which is based on a collection of interviews conducted with indigenous leaders in the Brazilian Amazon, says that native populations are reporting shifts in precipitation patterns, humidity, river levels, temperature, and fire and agricultural cycles. These shifts, measured against celestial timing used by indigenous groups, are affecting traditional ways of life that date back thousands of years.

“Indigenous groups who have lived in the Amazon for centuries, even millennia, are seeing signs that the climate is changing there," said Steve Schwartzman, lead author of the study and director of tropical forest policy at Environmental Defense Fund. “Indigenous people are telling us rainfall and river levels have changed; the fires they’re dealing with are
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A Line In The Oil Sands: 'By Gosh, Isn't Our Health Worth More Than Any Damn OIl?'

A Line In The Oil Sands: 'By Gosh, Isn't Our Health Worth More Than Any Damn OIl?' | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
Raymond Ladouceur remembers when he could dip a cup into the Athabasca River for a drink. He remembers when the trout and muskrats were plentiful -- and when his community was healthy.

 

But times have changed, said Ladouceur, an elder with the Métis Canadian aboriginal people.

 

"Now, you can't drink water from the river. It's too dangerous," Ladouceur told The Huffington Post, taking a break from chopping wood. "We're seeing deformed fish, which I'd never seen in my whole entire years. And something in that water is killing the muskrats."

 

Ladouceur lives some 100 miles downstream from the heart of Alberta's oil sands development. The sands underlie about 140,000 square kilometers (54,000 square miles) of Canadian boreal forest and peat bogs -- an area about the size of Florida -- and hold around 170 billion barrels of recoverable oil. Since mining began in 1967, at least two-thirds of the land has been leased for extraction... (click title for more)

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Peru declares environmental state of emergency in its rainforest

Peru declares environmental state of emergency in its rainforest | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
Government reports high levels of barium, lead, chrome and petroleum-related compounds in region that is home to oil field

 

Peru has declared an environmental state of emergency in a remote part of its northern Amazon rainforest, home for decades to one of the country's biggest oil fields, currently operated by the Argentinian company Pluspetrol.

 

Achuar and Kichwa indigenous people living in the Pastaza river basin near Peru's border with Ecuador have complained for decades about thepollution, while successive governments have failed to deal with it. Officials indicate that for years the state lacked the required environmental quality standards... (click title for more)

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