Japanese tsunami debris makes its way into Hawaiian birds | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

Your first view of Kamilo Beach on Hawaii's Big Island is of majestic rock, postcard-worthy waves and miles of uninhabited beach. But look closer at the sand and you see specks of blue, yellow and white plastic

 

A piece of a bottle cap. A corner of a milk crate. Half a toothbrush.

Kamilo Beach is part of the devastating legacy of the March 2011 Japan tsunami.

 

"It's disheartening to come out here and see all this marine debris in an area that's otherwise so remote, debris that's washing up from other countries," said Megan Lamson, debris project ... (click title to continue)