Culture Collapse Disorder
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Culture Collapse Disorder
Culture Collapse Disorder
Culture Collapse Disorder: The loss & destruction of home (places & planet) due to human impact and our modern consumer mindset
Curated by Bonnie Bright
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Reversing Genesis: The Ransacking of Temple Earth ~ Craig Chalquist PhD

Reversing Genesis: The Ransacking of Temple Earth ~ Craig Chalquist PhD | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

If you were to enter a church, mosque, or synagogue determined to plunder it before burning it down, you would probably end up in custody. Do the same to Earth, temple and home to us all, and you might be eligible for a government subsidy. Isn't that strange?

 

When psychologists talk about splitting, they refer to the habit of keeping sectors of life that belong together divided into different compartments. The unhealed child abuse survivor grows up to forget that the parent who beat them savagely was the parent they now idealize as an exemplar of loving discipline. The producer of violent films forbids his children to watch them. The speed dater with a track record of ending up with exploitative men convinces herself, again, that this man is the one she's been waiting for. The troll who attends church on Sunday spends the rest of the week vilifying people online.

 

Splitting, an emotional defense of early childhood, has become a character disorder of American society. News networks whose politician guests pushed the disastrous war in Iraq but never landed in prison...(Click title for more)

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Excerpts from "The 11th Hour" - Ecopsychology Documentary from Leonardo DiCaprio

Environmentalism was once the project of a passionate few. Now, millions of people have responded to ecological destruction and have created the groundwork for a sustainable and just world.

 

With the onset of global warming and other catastrophic events, environmentalism has become today a broader unifying human issue. We as citizens, leaders, consumers and voters have the opportunity to help integrate ecology into governmental policy and everyday living standards.

 

During this critical period of human history, healing the damage of industrial civilization is the task of our generation. Our response depends on the conscious evolution of our species, and this response could very well save this unique blue planet for future generations...(Click title for more)

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Plastic Bags Litter Seafloor: Scientific American Podcast

You know what's becoming more common than fish in the sea? Plastic bags.

Researchers at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute surveyed underwater video footage. They saw that plastic bags have become ubiquitous on the seafloor off the U.S. West Coast—even as far away as Hawaii.

The institute's robot subs collected the videos over the last 22 years, mostly in and around Monterey Bay but also further afield. Technicians noted whenever it showed objects or animals.

The footage spanned shallow seafloors of 25 meters or so and areas nearly 4,000 meters deep. And in all too much of...

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IPS – Indigenous Nicaraguans Fight to the Death for Their Last Forest | Inter Press Service

IPS – Indigenous Nicaraguans Fight to the Death for Their Last Forest | Inter Press Service | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
Indigenous Nicaraguans Fight to the Death for Their Last Forest - Indigenous communities in northern Nicaragua are demanding that the authorities take urgent action to halt the attacks on their lives and territory by illegal invaders.

 

The Mayangna live from hunting and fishing, domestic livestock raising and subsistence agriculture, growing crops like corn, beans and tubers with traditional methods. But their way of life has been severely impacted by the invading farmers.
 

“They shoot everything, burn everything, poison the water in the rivers, and chop down the giant trees that have given us shade and protection for years, and then they continue their advance, and nothing stops them,” said Genaro.

 

“You don’t see tapirs anymore, the pumas and oncillas (tiger cats) have fled the area, you no longer hear the singing of the thousands of birds that used to tell us when it was going to rain. Even the big fish in the rivers are gone. Everything is disappearing...(click title for more)

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When Earth is Scarred Forever

When Earth is Scarred Forever | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
Our planet is covered in pockmarks so deep that they can be seen from space. Some were caused by asteroid strikes, but most are the result of human meddling. Here are some of the most incredible examples of the scarred Earth.
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Remember the BP Oil Spill? Malformed Fish Do

You’ve heard of the canary in the coalmine. Well, a species called the Gulf killifish might be the fish in the oil well. Three years ago, the blowout at BP's Macondo well spewed more than 5 million barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico.

 

Despite attempts to recover it, much of that oil made it into sediments. And new tests show that such oiled sediments are bad for Gulf fish. The research is in the journal Environmental Science and Technology.

 

When a consortium of researchers ran those tests, they found multiple negative effects. The oiled sediments were associated with delayed hatching of embryos, smaller newborns and heart defects. And fewer of the eggs hatched at all... (click title for more)

 

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From Rachel Carson's "Silent Spring"

From Rachel Carson's "Silent Spring" | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

There was a strange stillness. The birds, for example where had they gone? Many people spoke of them, puzzled and disturbed. The feeding stations in the backyards were deserted. The few birds seen anywhere were moribund; they trembled violently and could not fly. It was a spring without voices. On the mornings that had once throbbed with the dawn chorus of robins, catbirds, doves, jays, wrens, and scores of other bird voices there was now no sound; only silence lay over the fields and woods and marsh.

 

On the farms the hens brooded, but no chicks hatched. The farmers complained that they were unable to raise any pigs the litters were small and the young survived only a few days. The apple trees were coming into bloom but no bees droned among the blossoms, so there was no pollination and there would be no fruit.

 

The roadsides, once so attractive, were now lined with browned and 249 withered vegetation as though swept by fire. These, too, were silent, deserted by all living things. Even the streams were now lifeless. Anglers no longer Rachel Carson visited them, for all the fish had died.
 

In the gutters under the eaves and between the shingles of the roofs, a white granular powder still showed a few patches; some weeks before it had fallen like snow upon the roofs and the lawns, the fields and streams.

No witchcraft, no enemy action had silenced the rebirth of new life in this stricken world. The people had done it themselves... (click title for more)

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'Shocking' Oceans Report Warns Of Impending Mass Extinction

'Shocking' Oceans Report Warns Of Impending Mass Extinction | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
If the current actions contributing to a multifaceted degradation of the world's oceans aren't curbed, a mass extinction unlike anything human history has ever seen is coming, an expert panel of scientists warns in an alarming new report.

 

The preliminary report from the International Programme on the State of the Ocean (IPSO) is the result of the first-ever interdisciplinary international workshop examining the combined impact of all of the stressors currently affecting the oceans, including pollution, warming, acidification, overfishing and hypoxia.

 

“The findings are shocking," Dr. Alex Rogers, IPSO's scientific director, said in a statement released by the group. "This is a very serious situation demanding unequivocal action at every level. We are looking at consequences for humankind that will impact in our lifetime, and worse, our children's and generations beyond that."

 

The scientific panel concluded that degeneration in the oceans is happening much faster than has been predicted, and that the combination of factors currently distressing the marine environment is contributing to the... (click title for more)

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Spring rains bring life to Midwest granaries but foster Gulf of Mexico 'Dead Zone'

Spring rains bring life to Midwest granaries but foster Gulf of Mexico 'Dead Zone' | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
The most serious ongoing water pollution problem in the Gulf of Mexico originates not from oil rigs, as many people believe, but rainstorms and fields of corn and soybeans a thousand miles away in the Midwest.

 

Keynoting a symposium at the 245th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society, Nancy N. Rabalais, Ph.D., emphasized that oil spills like the 2010 Deepwater Horizon disaster, claim a terrible toll. Sometimes, however, they overshadow the underlying water pollution problem that has been growing more and more severe for almost 40 years.

 

“The Dead Zone is a vast expanse of water, sometimes as large as the state of Massachusetts, that has so little oxygen that fish, shellfish and other marine life cannot survive,” Rabalais explained. “The oxygen disappears as a result of fertilizer that washes off farm fields in the Midwest into the Mississippi River. Just as fertilizer makes corn and soybeans grow, it stimulates the growth of plants in the water — algae in the Gulf. The algae bloom and eventually die and decay, removing oxygen from the water. The result is water too oxygen-depleted to support life.”.. (Click title for more)

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170 cases of mass die-offs—some inexplicable—of birds, fish, and animals in 43 countries since the beginning of 2013

170 cases of mass die-offs—some inexplicable—of birds, fish, and animals in 43 countries since the beginning of 2013 | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

4th April 2013 – Hundreds of Sea Birds wash up dead on Kirkcaldy beach in Scotland. Link

3rd April 2013 – Thousands more Starfish wash ashore dead in Cleethorpes, England. Link

3rd April 2013 – Thousands of Fish wash up dead on Lake Erie shores in Buffalo, America. Link

3rd April 2013 – 17+ Dolphins and several Penguins wash ashore dead in Adelaide, Australia. Link

3rd April 2013 – Hundreds of dead Fish found floating along Rock River in Illinois, America. Link

3rd April 2013 – Tens of thousands of farm animals have died from snowfall in Wales & England. Link

3rd April 2013 – Hundreds of Sea Birds wash up dead on North East coast in England. Link

2nd April 2013 – 60 Turtles found dead in a creek in Sarina, Australia. Link

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EPA report: More than half of U.S. rivers in poor shape

EPA report: More than half of U.S. rivers in poor shape | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
More than half of the country’s rivers and streams are in poor biological health, unable to support healthy populations of aquatic insects and other creatures, according to a nationwide survey...

 

More than half of the country’s rivers and streams are in poor biological health, unable to support healthy populations of aquatic insects and other creatures, according to a nationwide survey released Tuesday.

The Environmental Protection Agency sampled nearly 2,000 locations in 2008 and 2009 — from rivers as large as the Mississippi River to streams small enough for wading. The study found more than 55 percent of them in poor condition, 23 percent in fair shape, and 21 percent in good biological health.

 

The most widespread problem was high levels of nutrient pollution, caused by... (click title for more)

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Eco-pathic

One of the things about this work is the opportunity to use words in news ways, even invent new words, to put forth ideas and concepts; indeed to offer unexpected arrangements of concepts to try to illustrate new thinking and new paradigms. Derrieck Jensen, in his book Endgame (Vol. II) offers a section on psychopathology in which he references the definition of a psychopath from the IDC-10 Classification of Mental and Behavioural Disorders, World Health Organization, Genevea, 1992, section F60.2 on Dissocial (Antisocial Personality Disorder).


f you are courageous enough, there is room for us to step out of the box we have been raised in, the paradigm of our society and culture, and begin to view broader trends in the context of ecology. When we do that, we realize something is gravely wrong. What we do next, when given the opportunity to wake up, is partly the subject here. It is precisely because we as individuals, as a culture and as a civilization, don’t do anything about it, that the label of ecopathic is justified. In this case, rather than... (click title for more)

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The least sustainable city: Phoenix as a harbinger for our hot future

The least sustainable city: Phoenix as a harbinger for our hot future | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

Of course, it’s an easy city to pick on. The nation’s 13th largest metropolitan area (nudging out Detroit) crams 4.3 million people into a low bowl in a hot desert, where horrific heat waves and windstorms visit it regularly. It snuggles next to the nation’s largest nuclear plant and, having exhausted local sources, it depends on an improbable infrastructure to suck water from the distant (and dwindling) Colorado River.

 

In Phoenix, you don’t ask: What could go wrong? You ask: What couldn’t?

And that’s the point, really. Phoenix’s multiple vulnerabilities, which are plenty daunting taken one by one, have the capacity to magnify one another, like compounding illnesses. In this regard, it’s a quintessentially modern city, a pyramid of complexities requiring large energy inputs to keep the whole apparatus humming.

 

The urban disasters of our time — New Orleans hit by Katrina, New York City swamped by Sandy — may arise from single storms, but the damage they do is the result of a chain reaction of failures — grids going down, levees failing, backup systems not backing up. As you might expect, academics have come up with a name for such breakdowns... Click title for more

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By the Way, Your Home Is on Fire: Climate Change and the Dangers of Stasis

By the Way, Your Home Is on Fire: Climate Change and the Dangers of Stasis | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
"Sometimes the right thing to do in ordinary times is exactly the wrong thing to do in extraordinary times."

 

A high-powered financial executive, he had just arrived on the 66th floor of his office building and entered his office carrying his coffee, when he saw what looked like confetti falling everywhere — not a typical 66th floor spectacle. Moments later, one of his friends ran out of a meeting room shouting, “They’re back.”

 

It was, of course, the morning of September 11th and his friend had seen a plane crash into the north tower of the World Trade Center. My interviewee and his colleagues in the south tower got on the elevator. In another 15 minutes or so, that was going to be a fast way to die, but they managed to ride down to the 44th floor lobby safely. A guy with a bullhorn was there, telling people to go back to their offices.

 

Still holding his cup of coffee, he decided... (click title for more)

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Ecopsychology in Ten Easy Lessons

Ecopsychology in Ten Easy Lessons | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

What are the trees saying? I am listening closely. Listening, as I have been advised, with the whole of my being. Trying to hear a voice, this voice of the trees, this voice I’ve traveled so far to hear. And it has arrived, finally, wandering up through the branches, carried by the wind, this voice so very old. What is it saying? The message is simple and clear. It’s saying: “Hey buddy, you’re fucked.”

 

Fucked is truly what I am—though perhaps not technically. Technically, I’m bushwhacking across one of the planet’s last true wilds, lost in the southern portion of South America named Patagonia by Magellan. What I wanted was a place untouched by man or machine—a place that has never seen a can of Coca-Cola. Instead, what I got was caught in the worst storm in a decade: freezing rain, blinding snow, winds gusting up to a hundred miles per hour. And this would be bad enough, but the real reason... (click title for more) 

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“Then a strange blight crept over the area..."

“Then a strange blight crept over the area..." | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

WHEN RACHEL Carson entitled her prescient 1962 book “Silent Spring,’’ she was imagining the dawning of the season without the sweet sounds of wildlife. She noted that, even then, in many parts of the United States, spring “comes unheralded by the return of birds, and the early mornings are strangely silent where once they were filled with the beauty of birdsong.’’

 

Carson’s book was heard as a resounding alarm, jumpstarting the contemporary environmental movement. In important ways, her warning was heeded (restrictions on DDT), but the human assault on the natural world only escalated in the decades since, with last week’s catastrophe in Japan a latest signal of the danger.

 

“There was once a town in the heart of America where all life seemed to live in harmony with its surroundings.’’ The book begins with what Carson calls a fable for tomorrow... (click title for more)

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Why Warming Oceans Could Mean Dwindling Fish | TIME.com

Why Warming Oceans Could Mean Dwindling Fish | TIME.com | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
Scientists knew that climate change would eventually impact fisheries, but new research indicates that warming water is already affecting the kind of fish that end up on your dinner table.

 

It’s easy to forget that global warming doesn’t just refer to the rising temperature of the air. Climate change is having an enormous, if less well understood, impact on the oceans, which already absorb far more carbon dioxide than the atmosphere. Like so much of what goes on in the vast depths that cover more than two-thirds of our planet’s surface, the effect of climate change on the oceans remains a black box—albeit one that scientists are working to illuminate.

 

Here’s one way: fisheries. Wild fish remain a major source of protein for humanity—as well as a major source of reality TV shows—and for some coastal communities, fish mean even more. Scientists aren’t clear about what climate change, including the warming of the oceans, will have on wild fisheries...


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The Sixth Mass Extinction Is Upon Us. Can Humans Survive?

The Sixth Mass Extinction Is Upon Us. Can Humans Survive? | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
Five mass extinctions have nearly wiped out life on earth. The sixth is coming.

 

OVER THE past four years, bee colonies have undergone a disturbing transformation. As helpless beekeepers looked on, the machinelike efficiency of these communal insects devolved into inexplicable disorganization. Worker bees would fly away, never to return; adolescent bees wandered aimlessly in the hive; and the daily jobs in the colony were left undone until honey production stopped and eggs died of neglect. Colony collapse disorder, as it is known, has claimed roughly 30 percent of bee colonies every winter since 2007.

 

If bees go extinct, their loss will trigger an extinction domino effect, because crops from apples to broccoli rely on these insects for pollination. At the same time, over a third of the world’s amphibian species are threatened with extinction, and Harvard evolutionary biologist and conservationist E.O. Wilson estimates that 27,000 species of all kinds go extinct per year... (click title for more)

 

 

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A Line In The Oil Sands: 'By Gosh, Isn't Our Health Worth More Than Any Damn OIl?'

A Line In The Oil Sands: 'By Gosh, Isn't Our Health Worth More Than Any Damn OIl?' | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
Raymond Ladouceur remembers when he could dip a cup into the Athabasca River for a drink. He remembers when the trout and muskrats were plentiful -- and when his community was healthy.

 

But times have changed, said Ladouceur, an elder with the Métis Canadian aboriginal people.

 

"Now, you can't drink water from the river. It's too dangerous," Ladouceur told The Huffington Post, taking a break from chopping wood. "We're seeing deformed fish, which I'd never seen in my whole entire years. And something in that water is killing the muskrats."

 

Ladouceur lives some 100 miles downstream from the heart of Alberta's oil sands development. The sands underlie about 140,000 square kilometers (54,000 square miles) of Canadian boreal forest and peat bogs -- an area about the size of Florida -- and hold around 170 billion barrels of recoverable oil. Since mining began in 1967, at least two-thirds of the land has been leased for extraction... (click title for more)

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Is There an Ecological Unconscious? - NYTimes.com

Is There an Ecological Unconscious? - NYTimes.com | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

About eight years ago, Glenn Albrecht began receiving frantic calls from residents of the Upper Hunter Valley, a 6,000-square-mile region in southeastern Australia. For generations the Upper Hunter was known as the “Tuscany of the South” — an oasis of alfalfa fields, dairy farms and lush English-style shires on a notoriously hot, parched continent. “The calls were like desperate pleas,” Albrecht, a philosopher and professor of sustainability at Murdoch University in Perth, recalled in June. “They said: ‘Can you help us? We’ve tried everyone else. Is there anything you can do about this?’

 

“There’s a scholar who talks about ‘heart’s ease,’ ” Albrecht told me as we sat in his car on a cliff above the Newcastle shore, overlooking the Pacific. In the distance, just before the earth curved out of sight, 40 coal tankers were lined up single file. “People have heart’s ease when they’re on their own country. If you force them off that country, if you take them away from their land, they feel the loss of heart’s ease as a kind of vertigo, a disintegration of their whole life.” Australian aborigines, Navajos and any number of indigenous peoples have reported this...(click title for more)

 

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Dead dolphins and shrimp with no eyes found after BP clean-up

Dead dolphins and shrimp with no eyes found after BP clean-up | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

Hundreds of beached dolphin carcasses, shrimp with no eyes, contaminated fish, ancient corals caked in oil and some seriously unwell people are among the legacies that scientists are still uncovering in the wake of BP's Deepwater Horizon spill.

 

This week it will be three years since the first of 4.9 billion barrels of crude oil gushed into the Gulf of Mexico, in what is now considered the largest marine oil spill in the history of the petroleum industry. As the scale of the ecological disaster unfolds, BP is appearing daily in a New Orleans federal court to battle over the extent of compensation it owes to the region.

 

Infant dolphins were found dead at six times average rates in January and February of 2013. More than 650 dolphins have been found beached in the oil spill area since the disaster began, which is more than four times the historical average. Sea turtles were also affected... (Click title for more)

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Marian Locksley's curator insight, April 14, 2013 5:23 AM

Contact with oil may also have reduced the number of juvenile bluefin tuna produced in 2010 by 20 per cent, with a potential reduction in future populations of about 4 per cent.


Contamination of smaller fish also means that toxic chemicals could make their way up the food chain after scientists found the spill had affected the cellular function of killifish, a common bait fish at the base of the food chain.

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Organic Pollutants Now Accumulating in Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau: Scientific American

Organic Pollutants Now Accumulating in Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau: Scientific American | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
The accumulation of DDT in the Himalayas exceeds levels found in the Arctic

 

Toxic chemicals are accumulating in the ecosystems of the Himalayas and the Tibetan plateau, researchers warn in the first comprehensive study to assess levels of certain organic pollutants in that part of the world.

 

Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are carbon-based compounds that are resistant to break-down. Some originate from the burning of fuel or the processing of electronic waste, and others are widely used as pesticides or herbicides or in the manufacture of solvents, plastics and pharmaceuticals. Some POPs, such as the pesticide dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and the herbicide Agent Orange, can cause diseases such as cancers, neurological disorders, reproductive dysfunction and birth defects.

 

Many POPs are volatile and insoluble, and can travel a long distance. “They tend to evaporate in hot places, hitch a ride on winds, and then condense in cold regions,” says... (Click title for more)

 
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Jesús Zoco's curator insight, November 29, 2013 5:14 AM

Este artículo alarma a la sociedad sobre problemas que causan los compuests orgánicos como el DDT, que se están acumulando en el Himalaya y la meseta tibetana debido a su transporte por los vientos provenientes de Europa y África. 

Según el convenio de Estocolmo,hay COPs como el DDT que se pueden usar como excepción ya que en África ayuda para prevenir la malaria. Sin embargo, pienso que se debería tener en cuenta que se está perjudicando el medio ambiente, no solo del lugar donde se está aplicando sino también el de otros que no tienen la culpa.

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More oceans swamped by plastic 'soup'

More oceans swamped by plastic 'soup' | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
Australian scientists say it will take at least 500 years to stop the growth of five swirling masses of plastic waste in the world's oceans.

 

Even that grim scenario would depend on an immediate ban on more plastic going into oceans, they say.

 

A swirling mass of plastic debris was first discovered in the so-called north Pacific gyre about 15 years ago.

 

Since then more areas of plastic... (click title for more)

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Maintaining Mental Health In The Age Of Madness, By Carolyn Baker

Maintaining Mental Health In The Age Of Madness, By Carolyn Baker | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

The World Health Organization defines mental health as “a state of well-being in which every individual realizes his or her own potential, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and fruitfully, and is able to make a contribution to her or his community.” A state of well-being is obviously more than just the absence of disease. It assumes that a human being is reasonably functional mentally, physically, emotionally, and spiritually. Similarly, this definition can be applied to healthy communities with the addition of social functionality as another aspect of well-being.

 

However, most readers are aware of the decline in mental health treatment within the past three decades. Whereas thirty years ago many working people had insurance benefits for outpatient psychotherapy as well as in-patient treatment, not only have the benefits dramatically decreased, but massive unemployment makes it virtually impossible for.. (click title for more)

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An Inside Look at the One of the First Villages Forced to Relocate Due to Climate Change

An Inside Look at the One of the First Villages Forced to Relocate Due to Climate Change | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
This community has contributed very little to anthropogenic climate change, yet they are feeling the proverbial heat in a much more profound and potentially devastating way.

 

For the most part, many people still experience climate change on an academic rather than a personal level. But for the villagers of Vunidogoloa on Vanua Levu, Fiji’s second largest island, climate change has become a daily intrusion on every day life. The villagers of Vunidogoloa are currently relocating to drier and higher land because of sea level rise, erosion, and intensifying floods. I had the opportunity to visit the village midway through this process – one of the very first village relocation projects in the world – and spoke with people young and old about their upcoming move.

 

Throughout 2012, these Fijian villagers have been in the process of moving from their current home village – a tract of land overlooking Natawa Bay, the largest bay in the South Pacific, to their new home which they named ... (Click TITLE to continue)....

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