Culture Collapse Disorder
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Culture Collapse Disorder
Culture Collapse Disorder
Culture Collapse Disorder: The loss & destruction of home (places & planet) due to human impact and our modern consumer mindset
Curated by Bonnie Bright
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IPS – Indigenous Nicaraguans Fight to the Death for Their Last Forest | Inter Press Service

IPS – Indigenous Nicaraguans Fight to the Death for Their Last Forest | Inter Press Service | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
Indigenous Nicaraguans Fight to the Death for Their Last Forest - Indigenous communities in northern Nicaragua are demanding that the authorities take urgent action to halt the attacks on their lives and territory by illegal invaders.

 

The Mayangna live from hunting and fishing, domestic livestock raising and subsistence agriculture, growing crops like corn, beans and tubers with traditional methods. But their way of life has been severely impacted by the invading farmers.
 

“They shoot everything, burn everything, poison the water in the rivers, and chop down the giant trees that have given us shade and protection for years, and then they continue their advance, and nothing stops them,” said Genaro.

 

“You don’t see tapirs anymore, the pumas and oncillas (tiger cats) have fled the area, you no longer hear the singing of the thousands of birds that used to tell us when it was going to rain. Even the big fish in the rivers are gone. Everything is disappearing...(click title for more)

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Indigenous tribes say effects of climate change already felt in Amazon rainforest

Indigenous tribes say effects of climate change already felt in Amazon rainforest | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
Tribal groups in Earth's largest rainforest are already being affected by shifts wrought by climate change, reports a paper published last week in the British journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B.

 

  

Tribal groups in Earth's largest rainforest are already being affected by shifts wrought by climate change, reports a paper published last week in the British journalPhilosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B.

The paper, which is based on a collection of interviews conducted with indigenous leaders in the Brazilian Amazon, says that native populations are reporting shifts in precipitation patterns, humidity, river levels, temperature, and fire and agricultural cycles. These shifts, measured against celestial timing used by indigenous groups, are affecting traditional ways of life that date back thousands of years.

“Indigenous groups who have lived in the Amazon for centuries, even millennia, are seeing signs that the climate is changing there," said Steve Schwartzman, lead author of the study and director of tropical forest policy at Environmental Defense Fund. “Indigenous people are telling us rainfall and river levels have changed; the fires they’re dealing with are
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