Culture Collapse Disorder
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Culture Collapse Disorder
Culture Collapse Disorder
Culture Collapse Disorder: The loss & destruction of home (places & planet) due to human impact and our modern consumer mindset
Curated by Bonnie Bright
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Chasing Ice: Climate change portrayed in devastatingly beautiful fashion

Chasing Ice: Climate change portrayed in devastatingly beautiful fashion | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

Photographer James Balog used to be sceptical about climate change. This was until 2005, when he was sent to the Arctic for an assignment.

 

 Disturbing statistics released by the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) in the US in August (2012) showed how sea ice cover in the Arctic had reached its lowest amountsince satellite observation began in 1979. The data concluded that just 1.58m square miles was now covered by ice – 27,000 square miles less than the previous record, set in September 2007. This figure decreased even further as summer melting continued in the region throughout September.

 

Chasing Ice doesn’t only map out the decline of some of the world’s biggest glaciers; it also marks wholesale changes in Balog’s views. It’s hard to believe that the man on screen, who appears so passionate about documenting these pristine landscapes, was once sceptical about mankind’s impact on climate change.

  

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Forever Groundhog Day For Climate?

Forever Groundhog Day For Climate? | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

A spectacular event captured on film in a new documentary, ‘Chasing Ice’, depicts the stark impact of global warming on the Arctic. The stunning sequence shows the largest glacier calving event ever filmed. An on-screen graphic emphasises the huge scale of the ice collapse:

 

‘It’s as if the entire lower tip of Manhattan broke off, except that the thickness, the height of it, is equivalent to buildings that are two-and-a-half or three times higher than they are.’

 

Photographer James Balog, who has been documenting changes in the Arctic and elsewhere under the auspices of the Extreme Ice Survey, explains how rapidly the glacier, Jakobshavn Glacier in Greenland, has shrunk in recent years:

 

‘It took a hundred years for it to retreat eight miles from 1900 to 2000. From 2000 to 2010 it retreated nine miles. So in ten years it retreated more than it had in the previous one hundred... (click title for more)

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