Culture Collapse Disorder
1.2K views | +0 today
Follow
Culture Collapse Disorder
Culture Collapse Disorder
Culture Collapse Disorder: The loss & destruction of home (places & planet) due to human impact and our modern consumer mindset
Curated by Bonnie Bright
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Bonnie Bright from Ecopsychology
Scoop.it!

Climate on the Couch

Climate on the Couch | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

Examining the psychological task of change, Mary-Jayne Rust looks at the ways in which we respond to the environmental crisis. How do old stories underlie our present reality?

 

While few people would now deny the reality of climate change and environmental crisis, many are still turning a blind eye to the situation we face. We are having great difficulty in making even the simplest of changes to our lives. The global scale of our crisis is overwhelming and it is easy to feel apathetic in response. This is made easier when our consumer lifestyles keep us well within our comfort zones.

When we do allow ourselves to feel, we might find a whole range of strong emotions, such as anxiety and fear about the future, despair at our lack of political will, grief for so many losses, guilt that we continue to be part of the cause, and more. While therapy has helped many of us to become more emotionally literate interpersonally, we are still a very stiff-upper-lip culture in relation to the bigger picture; when we block out our feelings, we lose touch with the urgency of crisis.

more...
Laura M. Smith's curator insight, May 17, 2014 9:39 AM

How do we move beyond the human skin to reclaim the vastness of our self?

Rescooped by Bonnie Bright from Ecopsychology
Scoop.it!

Fighting Despair to Fight Climate Change

Fighting Despair to Fight Climate Change | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

Without hope, the horror of climate change paralyzes rather than politicizes.

 

There is a brutal conundrum at the heart of the fight against catastrophic climate change: when people grasp just how dire things are, they’re as likely to hunker down as to rise up. Maybe more likely.

 

A haunting New York Times Magazine story demonstrates this. It’s about Paul Kingsnorth, a onetime environmental activist who has essentially given up, devoting himself instead to a multifaceted project of grief and survival called Dark Mountain. “Everything had gotten worse,” Kingsnorth told writer Daniel Smith. “You look at every trend that environmentalists like me have been trying to stop for 50 years, and every single thing had gotten worse. And I thought: I can’t do this anymore. I can’t sit here saying: ‘Yes, comrades, we must act! We only need one more push, and we’ll save the world!’ I don’t believe it. I don’t believe it! So what do I do?”

 

What Kingsnorth did was draft an apocalyptic manifesto, titled Uncivilisation. “It is, it seems, our civilisation’s turn to experience the inrush of the savage and the unseen; our turn to be brought up short by contact with untamed reality,” he wrote. “There is a fall coming... (Click title for more)

 

more...
No comment yet.