Culture Collapse Disorder
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Culture Collapse Disorder
Culture Collapse Disorder
Culture Collapse Disorder: The loss & destruction of home (places & planet) due to human impact and our modern consumer mindset
Curated by Bonnie Bright
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Remember the BP Oil Spill? Malformed Fish Do

You’ve heard of the canary in the coalmine. Well, a species called the Gulf killifish might be the fish in the oil well. Three years ago, the blowout at BP's Macondo well spewed more than 5 million barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico.

 

Despite attempts to recover it, much of that oil made it into sediments. And new tests show that such oiled sediments are bad for Gulf fish. The research is in the journal Environmental Science and Technology.

 

When a consortium of researchers ran those tests, they found multiple negative effects. The oiled sediments were associated with delayed hatching of embryos, smaller newborns and heart defects. And fewer of the eggs hatched at all... (click title for more)

 

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Spring rains bring life to Midwest granaries but foster Gulf of Mexico 'Dead Zone'

Spring rains bring life to Midwest granaries but foster Gulf of Mexico 'Dead Zone' | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
The most serious ongoing water pollution problem in the Gulf of Mexico originates not from oil rigs, as many people believe, but rainstorms and fields of corn and soybeans a thousand miles away in the Midwest.

 

Keynoting a symposium at the 245th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society, Nancy N. Rabalais, Ph.D., emphasized that oil spills like the 2010 Deepwater Horizon disaster, claim a terrible toll. Sometimes, however, they overshadow the underlying water pollution problem that has been growing more and more severe for almost 40 years.

 

“The Dead Zone is a vast expanse of water, sometimes as large as the state of Massachusetts, that has so little oxygen that fish, shellfish and other marine life cannot survive,” Rabalais explained. “The oxygen disappears as a result of fertilizer that washes off farm fields in the Midwest into the Mississippi River. Just as fertilizer makes corn and soybeans grow, it stimulates the growth of plants in the water — algae in the Gulf. The algae bloom and eventually die and decay, removing oxygen from the water. The result is water too oxygen-depleted to support life.”.. (Click title for more)

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Dead dolphins and shrimp with no eyes found after BP clean-up

Dead dolphins and shrimp with no eyes found after BP clean-up | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

Hundreds of beached dolphin carcasses, shrimp with no eyes, contaminated fish, ancient corals caked in oil and some seriously unwell people are among the legacies that scientists are still uncovering in the wake of BP's Deepwater Horizon spill.

 

This week it will be three years since the first of 4.9 billion barrels of crude oil gushed into the Gulf of Mexico, in what is now considered the largest marine oil spill in the history of the petroleum industry. As the scale of the ecological disaster unfolds, BP is appearing daily in a New Orleans federal court to battle over the extent of compensation it owes to the region.

 

Infant dolphins were found dead at six times average rates in January and February of 2013. More than 650 dolphins have been found beached in the oil spill area since the disaster began, which is more than four times the historical average. Sea turtles were also affected... (Click title for more)

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Marian Locksley's curator insight, April 14, 2013 5:23 AM

Contact with oil may also have reduced the number of juvenile bluefin tuna produced in 2010 by 20 per cent, with a potential reduction in future populations of about 4 per cent.


Contamination of smaller fish also means that toxic chemicals could make their way up the food chain after scientists found the spill had affected the cellular function of killifish, a common bait fish at the base of the food chain.