Culture Collapse Disorder
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Culture Collapse Disorder
Culture Collapse Disorder
Culture Collapse Disorder: The loss & destruction of home (places & planet) due to human impact and our modern consumer mindset
Curated by Bonnie Bright
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Why isn't anyone talking about Ocean Acidification?

Why isn't anyone talking about Ocean Acidification? | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
Will ocean acidification disrupt the planet's ecosystem before climate change does?

 

Climate change is not the only outcome of increased greenhouse gas concentrations. The oceans have absorbed a lot of the excess carbon in the atmosphere, reducing the impacts of climate change to date, but at a cost. Higher concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere have led to an increase in acidity of ocean water, a process known as ocean acidification. The process of acidification is laid out by Cheryl Logan in a user-friendly 2010 summary in the journal Bioscience.

 

Ocean acidification occurs when CO2 dissolves in ocean water, undergoing a chemical reaction that produces carbonic acid. The rate of this reaction is completely predictable and as a result the progression of acidification as CO2 levels increase is completely predictable. Unlike climate change, ocean acidification is not controversial at all—... (click title for more)

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Why Warming Oceans Could Mean Dwindling Fish | TIME.com

Why Warming Oceans Could Mean Dwindling Fish | TIME.com | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
Scientists knew that climate change would eventually impact fisheries, but new research indicates that warming water is already affecting the kind of fish that end up on your dinner table.

 

It’s easy to forget that global warming doesn’t just refer to the rising temperature of the air. Climate change is having an enormous, if less well understood, impact on the oceans, which already absorb far more carbon dioxide than the atmosphere. Like so much of what goes on in the vast depths that cover more than two-thirds of our planet’s surface, the effect of climate change on the oceans remains a black box—albeit one that scientists are working to illuminate.

 

Here’s one way: fisheries. Wild fish remain a major source of protein for humanity—as well as a major source of reality TV shows—and for some coastal communities, fish mean even more. Scientists aren’t clear about what climate change, including the warming of the oceans, will have on wild fisheries...


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'Shocking' Oceans Report Warns Of Impending Mass Extinction

'Shocking' Oceans Report Warns Of Impending Mass Extinction | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
If the current actions contributing to a multifaceted degradation of the world's oceans aren't curbed, a mass extinction unlike anything human history has ever seen is coming, an expert panel of scientists warns in an alarming new report.

 

The preliminary report from the International Programme on the State of the Ocean (IPSO) is the result of the first-ever interdisciplinary international workshop examining the combined impact of all of the stressors currently affecting the oceans, including pollution, warming, acidification, overfishing and hypoxia.

 

“The findings are shocking," Dr. Alex Rogers, IPSO's scientific director, said in a statement released by the group. "This is a very serious situation demanding unequivocal action at every level. We are looking at consequences for humankind that will impact in our lifetime, and worse, our children's and generations beyond that."

 

The scientific panel concluded that degeneration in the oceans is happening much faster than has been predicted, and that the combination of factors currently distressing the marine environment is contributing to the... (click title for more)

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Spring rains bring life to Midwest granaries but foster Gulf of Mexico 'Dead Zone'

Spring rains bring life to Midwest granaries but foster Gulf of Mexico 'Dead Zone' | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
The most serious ongoing water pollution problem in the Gulf of Mexico originates not from oil rigs, as many people believe, but rainstorms and fields of corn and soybeans a thousand miles away in the Midwest.

 

Keynoting a symposium at the 245th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society, Nancy N. Rabalais, Ph.D., emphasized that oil spills like the 2010 Deepwater Horizon disaster, claim a terrible toll. Sometimes, however, they overshadow the underlying water pollution problem that has been growing more and more severe for almost 40 years.

 

“The Dead Zone is a vast expanse of water, sometimes as large as the state of Massachusetts, that has so little oxygen that fish, shellfish and other marine life cannot survive,” Rabalais explained. “The oxygen disappears as a result of fertilizer that washes off farm fields in the Midwest into the Mississippi River. Just as fertilizer makes corn and soybeans grow, it stimulates the growth of plants in the water — algae in the Gulf. The algae bloom and eventually die and decay, removing oxygen from the water. The result is water too oxygen-depleted to support life.”.. (Click title for more)

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Hundreds of starving baby sea lions beaching off California, cause unknown

One was found huddled in a flower pot.

In late January, scientists surveying Channel Island sea lion rookiers reported something worrying: Pups out there were in bad shape. By early February, regional marine mammal rescue centers were concerned.

The strandings hadn’t stopped. Instead, the pace was picking up.

Now, hundreds of these little animals have been admitted to rescue centers between Santa Barbara and San Diego. For a non-El Niño year, the numbers are much too high, too early. Something is going badly wrong offshore, and no one knows what it is yet.

“We’re in the process of trying to understand what is actually causing this,” said Sharon Melin, a wildlife biologist with the National Fisheries Service. “The stranding centers in Southern California are being inundated with animals. It hasn’t hit the northern centers yet.”

As of Mar. 13, 517 pups had been admitted to five Southern California rescue centers. That total is higher than the total for...(Click title)

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A World Without Coral Reefs

A World Without Coral Reefs | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
By persisting in the false belief that coral reefs have a future, we grossly misallocate the funds needed to cope with the fallout from their collapse.

 

IT’S past time to tell the truth about the state of the world’s coral reefs, the nurseries of tropical coastal fish stocks. They have become zombie ecosystems, neither dead nor truly alive in any functional sense, and on a trajectory to collapse within a human generation. There will be remnants here and there, but the global coral reef ecosystem — with its storehouse of biodiversity and fisheries supporting millions of the world’s poor — will cease to be.

 

Overfishing, ocean acidification and pollution are pushing coral reefs into oblivion. Each of those forces alone is fully capable of causing the global collapse of coral reefs; together, they assure it. The scientific evidence for this is compelling and unequivocal, but there seems to be a collective reluctance to accept the logical conclusion — that there is no hope of saving the global coral reef ecosystem...

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Remember the BP Oil Spill? Malformed Fish Do

You’ve heard of the canary in the coalmine. Well, a species called the Gulf killifish might be the fish in the oil well. Three years ago, the blowout at BP's Macondo well spewed more than 5 million barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico.

 

Despite attempts to recover it, much of that oil made it into sediments. And new tests show that such oiled sediments are bad for Gulf fish. The research is in the journal Environmental Science and Technology.

 

When a consortium of researchers ran those tests, they found multiple negative effects. The oiled sediments were associated with delayed hatching of embryos, smaller newborns and heart defects. And fewer of the eggs hatched at all... (click title for more)

 

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Floating tsunami trash to be a decades-long headache

Floating tsunami trash to be a decades-long headache | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
PARIS (AFP) - The tsunami that ravaged northeast Japan in March 2011 created the biggest single dumping of rubbish, sweeping some five million tonnes of shattered buildings, cars, household goods and other rubble into the sea.

 

About three-and-a-half million tonnes, according to official Japanese estimates, sank immediately, leaving some 1.5 million tonnes of plastic, timber, fishing nets, shipping containers, industrial scrap and innumerable other objects to float deeper into the ocean.

 

Marine experts poring over the disaster say the floating trash adds significantly to the Pacific's already worrying pollution problem.

For many years, and possibly decades, items will be a hazard for shipping, a risk for sea mammals, turtles and birds, a hitchhiking invitation for... (Click title for more)

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If You Think China's Air Is Bad, You Should See The Water

If You Think China's Air Is Bad, You Should See The Water | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
The price of economic growth.

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The unhealthy smog that settled over Beijing earlier this year, capturing international media attention, is not the only visible sign of China's rapid economic growth and the resulting environmental hazards.

 

Countless rivers and lakes have also been contaminated by nearby factories, and sometimes, dumping by local residents.  

See China's water pollution > 

This March, more than 2,000 dead pigs were found floating in a Shanghai river, a main water source for the city's 23 million residents. 

Polluted water sources have been linked to a rise in "cancer villages," or areas where cancer rates are high among people who live along tainted waterways.  


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