Culture Collapse Disorder
1.2K views | +0 today
Follow
Culture Collapse Disorder
Culture Collapse Disorder
Culture Collapse Disorder: The loss & destruction of home (places & planet) due to human impact and our modern consumer mindset
Curated by Bonnie Bright
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Why Is It Taking So Long for Psychology to Go Green?

Why Is It Taking So Long for Psychology to Go Green? | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

Psychology also mostly ignores humanity's psychologically-dysfunctional relationship with nature that results in the ecodical behavior that is causing global catastrophe. In spite of abundant scientific information about the shocking effects of human actions on planetary ecosystems (our own life-support systems and the life-support systems of countless other life forms!), few psychologists concern themselves with the task of helping us understand or change that behavior.

But as Ralph Metzner reminded us in 1999, "It is in the hearts and minds of human beings that the causes and cures of the ecocatastrophe are to be found." Surely finding this cure is a task that psychologists and other mental health professionals are morally obliged to urgently undertake given our present circumstances?.... (Click title for more)

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bonnie Bright from Ecopsychology
Scoop.it!

Reversing Genesis: The Ransacking of Temple Earth ~ Craig Chalquist PhD

Reversing Genesis: The Ransacking of Temple Earth ~ Craig Chalquist PhD | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

If you were to enter a church, mosque, or synagogue determined to plunder it before burning it down, you would probably end up in custody. Do the same to Earth, temple and home to us all, and you might be eligible for a government subsidy. Isn't that strange?

 

When psychologists talk about splitting, they refer to the habit of keeping sectors of life that belong together divided into different compartments. The unhealed child abuse survivor grows up to forget that the parent who beat them savagely was the parent they now idealize as an exemplar of loving discipline. The producer of violent films forbids his children to watch them. The speed dater with a track record of ending up with exploitative men convinces herself, again, that this man is the one she's been waiting for. The troll who attends church on Sunday spends the rest of the week vilifying people online.

 

Splitting, an emotional defense of early childhood, has become a character disorder of American society. News networks whose politician guests pushed the disastrous war in Iraq but never landed in prison...(Click title for more)

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bonnie Bright from Ecopsychology
Scoop.it!

Fighting Despair to Fight Climate Change

Fighting Despair to Fight Climate Change | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

Without hope, the horror of climate change paralyzes rather than politicizes.

 

There is a brutal conundrum at the heart of the fight against catastrophic climate change: when people grasp just how dire things are, they’re as likely to hunker down as to rise up. Maybe more likely.

 

A haunting New York Times Magazine story demonstrates this. It’s about Paul Kingsnorth, a onetime environmental activist who has essentially given up, devoting himself instead to a multifaceted project of grief and survival called Dark Mountain. “Everything had gotten worse,” Kingsnorth told writer Daniel Smith. “You look at every trend that environmentalists like me have been trying to stop for 50 years, and every single thing had gotten worse. And I thought: I can’t do this anymore. I can’t sit here saying: ‘Yes, comrades, we must act! We only need one more push, and we’ll save the world!’ I don’t believe it. I don’t believe it! So what do I do?”

 

What Kingsnorth did was draft an apocalyptic manifesto, titled Uncivilisation. “It is, it seems, our civilisation’s turn to experience the inrush of the savage and the unseen; our turn to be brought up short by contact with untamed reality,” he wrote. “There is a fall coming... (Click title for more)

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bonnie Bright from Depth Psychology
Scoop.it!

Introduction to the Special Edition on Thomas Berry's The Great Work

Introduction to the Special Edition on Thomas Berry's The Great Work | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

In The Great Work Thomas Berry invites a deep reflection on our current ecological and cultural predicament. The move through this era of enormous cultural transition, from a period of human devastation of the Earth to—potentially—a period of benign presence, is the ‘great work’ that we must undertake if we are to fulfil the historical exigencies of our time.

 

Thomas Berry, cultural historian, is a remarkable and influential thinker on the complexities of this era and the requirements of a viable future. Berry, a Catholic priest, trained in the classical traditions of theology, immersed himself in a comprehensive investigation of the phenomenon of religion, and in particular Eastern religions. He taught Eastern religions at several U.S. universities prior to founding the PhD program in The Histories of Religions at Fordham, from 1966-1979. Berry has written several books on Eastern Religions, such as Buddhism and The Religions of India,1 and during the past few decades has addressed his work to the magnitude of the crisis facing Western civilization.

 

To situate the essays within The Great Work as well as the responses to the book, it may be beneficial to know some of the key influences that have shaped Berry’s perspectives. Over the course of a lifetime, Berry has developed a deep appreciation for the intense and specific human experiences that give rise to distinct religious traditions and expressions. He could see that particular and penetrating  (Click title to read the full article)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

The Anthropocene: From Global Change to Planetary Stewardship

The Anthropocene: From Global Change to Planetary Stewardship | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

Over the past century, the total material wealth of humanity has been enhanced. However, in the twenty-first century, we face scarcity in critical resources, the degradation of ecosystem services, and the erosion of the planet’s capability to absorb our wastes. Equity issues remain stubbornly difficult to solve.

 

This situation is novel in its speed, its global scale and its threat to the resilience of the Earth System. The advent of the Anthropence, the time interval in which human activities now rival global geophysical processes, suggests that we need to fundamentally alter our relationship with the planet we inhabit. Many approaches could be adopted, ranging from geo-engineering solutions that purposefully manipulate parts of the Earth System to becoming active stewards of our own life support system.

 

The Anthropocene is a reminder that the Holocene, during which complex human societies have developed, has been a stable, accommodating environment and is the only state of the Earth System that we know for sure can support contemporary society. The need to achieve effective planetary stewardship is urgent... (click title for more)

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bonnie Bright from Ecopsychology
Scoop.it!

Expanded Consciousness: The Instinctive Bond Between Humans and Nature: Developmental Psychology

Expanded Consciousness: The Instinctive Bond Between Humans and Nature: Developmental Psychology | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

The biophilia hypothesis asserts the existence of a fundamental, genetically based, human need and propensity to affiliate with life and life like processes. Consider, for example, that recent studies have shown that even minimal connection with nature—such as looking at it through a window—increases productivity and health in the workplace, promotes healing of patients in hospitals, and reduces the frequency of sickness in prisons. Other studies have begun to show that when given the option, humans choose landscapes such as prominences near water from which parkland can be viewed that fit patterns laid down deep in human

 
history on the savannas of East Africa. Wilson (1992) points out that people crowd national parks to experience natural landscapes, and ‘‘travel long distances to stroll along the seashore, for reasons they can’t put into words’’. According to Wilson (1984), the biophilic instinct emerges, often unconsciously, in our cognition, emotions, art, and ethics, and unfolds ‘‘in the predictable fantasies and responses of individuals from early childhood onward. It cascades into repetitive patterns of culture across most or all societies’... (click title to read more)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Ecopsychology 101: James Hillman and the pain of community loss

Ecopsychology 101: James Hillman and the pain of community loss | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

It feels like a wound because it is a wound. There is in fact a growing branch of psychology that deals with the impact of the natural environment on the human mind and body — ecopsychology.

 

Ecopsychology, as propounded by James Hillman, a therapist based in northeast Connecticut, seeks to redefine the goals of psychology by paying heed to the health of one's environment just as one would the pathology of one's family. As Hillman wrote in the foreword to Ecopsychology: Restoring the Earth, Healing the Mind, "Psychology, so dedicated to awakening human consciousness, needs to wake itself up to one of the most ancient human truths: we cannot be studied or cured apart from the planet."

 

Ecopsychology is on the level — the community level, that is....  (Click title for more)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Welcome to the Anthropocene

Welcome to the Anthropocene | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
THE Earth is a big thing; if you divided it up evenly among its 7 billion inhabitants, they would get almost 1 trillion tonnes each. To think that the workings of so...

 

THE Earth is a big thing; if you divided it up evenly among its 7 billion inhabitants, they would get almost 1 trillion tonnes each. To think that the workings of so vast an entity could be lastingly changed by a species that has been scampering across its surface for less than 1% of 1% of its history seems, on the face of it, absurd. But it is not. Humans have become a force of nature reshaping the planet on a geological scale—but at a far-faster-than-geological speed.

 

A single engineering project, the Syncrude mine in the Athabasca tar sands, involves moving 30 billion tonnes of earth—twice the amount of sediment that flows down all the rivers in the world in a year. That sediment flow itself, meanwhile, is shrinking; almost 50,000 large dams have over the past half- century cut the flow by nearly a fifth. That is one reason why the Earth's deltas, home to hundreds of millions of people, are eroding away faster than they can be replenished.... (click title for more)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

When Earth is Scarred Forever

When Earth is Scarred Forever | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
Our planet is covered in pockmarks so deep that they can be seen from space. Some were caused by asteroid strikes, but most are the result of human meddling. Here are some of the most incredible examples of the scarred Earth.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Nearly half of fracking happens in places short on water

Nearly half of fracking happens in places short on water | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

Fracking for oil and gas is a thirsty business.

 

Hydraulic fracturing uses large amounts of pressurized water — mixed with sand and chemicals — to crack subterranean rocks and release oil or natural gas. Up to 10 million gallons of water can go into a single well.

And according to a new study, it’s happening in many places where water supplies are already stretched perilously thin.

 

The study, released today by the nonprofit group Ceres, examined 25,450 fracked wells across the United States and found that 47 percent lie in areas that face high or extremely high “water stress.” In those areas, at least 80 percent of the available fresh water is already being used in homes, farms or businesses.

 

The numbers have big implications...(click title for more)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

The Gaia Foundation Exposes The True Cost of Hi-Tech

The Gaia Foundation Exposes The True Cost of Hi-Tech | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

There are hundreds of components in each of these gadgets, using dozens of metals and minerals. The path each component takes from the Earth to be extracted, smelted and processed criss-crosses the planet through complex routes that companies fail – or refuse – to track.


A new report from the Gaia Foundation and allies exposes how the accelerating consumption and wasteful disposal of our electronic gadgets is leading to growing ecological and materials crises. “Short Circuit: the Lifecycle of our Electronic Gadgets and the True Cost to Earth” was launched last week in the Houses of Parliament, alongside the London Mining Network, Friends of the Earth and the Great Recovery project. The report has been produced in collaboration with the African Biodiversity Network and others.


With the number of mobile-connected devices projected to exceed the number of humans on Earth by the end of 2013, the report draws attention to the vast and accelerating amount of metals and minerals that are being mined from the Earth for these gadgets, only to quickly return as wasted and toxic landfill.... (click title for more)

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bonnie Bright from Ecopsychology
Scoop.it!

Knowing the Land, Knowing the Self | Dr. Jeff Howlin

Knowing the Land, Knowing the Self | Dr. Jeff Howlin | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

Once in his life a man ought to concentrate his mind upon the remembered earth, I believe. He ought to give himself up to a particular landscape in his experience, to look at it from as many angles as he can, to wonder about it, to dwell upon it. He ought to imagine that he touches it with his hands at every season and listens to the sounds that are made upon it. He ought to imagine the creatures there and all the faintest motions of the wind. He ought to recollect the glare of noon and all the colors of the dawn and dusk. (N. Scott Momaday, The Way to Rainy Mountain, p. 83)

 

I have thought often about these words from N. Scott Momaday since I read his moving book, The Way to Rainy Mountain, which retells Kiowa myths from his childhood and people. I read this... (click title for more)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Katherine Rowland: Whole Earth Mental Health

Katherine Rowland: Whole Earth Mental Health | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
The evolving field of ecopsychology aims to cure what ails us by bridging the human-nature rift.

 

Oregon-based clinical psychologist Thomas Doherty has been at the forefront of efforts to usher the field into the realm of academic credibility. One of the directors of the American Psychological Association’s recently established Climate Change Task Force, Doherty is encouraging his mental health colleagues to address the psychic damage caused by ecological decline and the modern world’s insistent separateness from nature.

 

“Ecopsychology is not a discipline, so much as it is a social movement, a world view,” he says. Although practitioners have evolved a number of diverse treatment methods, from conducting therapy sessions out of doors to helping clients grieve toxic spills and species loss, Doherty says one of the unifying ideas in ecopsychology is its attempt to integrate a different set of questions into clinical practice. What, for example, does it mean to live as part of the web of life, but to behave as if we... (click title for more)

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bonnie Bright from Ecopsychology
Scoop.it!

Welcome to the Anthropocene

Welcome to the Anthropocene | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

When I was a boy, we lived in the Holocene. That’s what the geologists called it, anyway, from the Greek words for  “entirely new.” The term was settled on in 1885 and defined as the geological epoch that followed the end of the Pleistocene about 12,000 years ago, after the retreat of the ice from the northern hemisphere, as the planet entered one of its periodic interglacial periods.  The Holocene, a relatively mild, even balmy, period, saw the rise of human civilization—indeed, all of recorded human history.  Bet we’ll miss it when it’s gone.

 

Almost two centuries after the beginning of the industrial revolution in Europe, an ecologist named Eugene F. Stoermer coined the word “anthropocene” to refer to the evidence of the human impact on the planet, an impact he judged to be on par with the great geological events of the past. The word means the “human new.” He started using the word in the early 1980s, but it didn’t catch on until 2000, when he and Paul Crutzen used the word in print for the first time.  While not officially adopted... (click title for more)

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bonnie Bright from Ecopsychology
Scoop.it!

On Being Human in a More-Than-Human World - David Abram

On Being Human in a More-Than-Human World - David Abram | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

I have fallen in love outward.
—Robinson Jeffers, “The Tower Beyond Tragedy”

 

“Of course we humans are mightily special....Our opposable thumbs, our ability to balance and ambulate on our hind legs, our capacity for reflection, and our slyness with tools and ever-more-complex technologies entail that we are a pretty unique bunch.

 

But then again, that hawk soaring overhead is able to fly without any of the contrivances that we depend upon, and the apple tree over there is able to squeeze apples directly out of its limbs, which in itself is pretty damn unique, and a far cry from anything that I can muster with my own body.

 

Perhaps you could say that the compelling stories we two-leggeds regularly concoct could be called an efflorescence, or even a kind of fruit, like those apples. But still, the way that some whales dive to a depth of six thousand feet, holding their breath for over ninety minutes, seems another kind of astonishment, as is the journey of monarch butterflies. After overwintering in a small cluster of conifers in the Mexican highlands, the monarchs navigate their way north... (Click title for more)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

The Earth Has a Soul: C.G. Jung on Nature, Technology & Modern Life by Meredith Sabini

The Earth Has a Soul: C.G. Jung on Nature, Technology & Modern Life by Meredith Sabini | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

Restoring Nature's Divinity
“Matter in the wrong place is dirt. People get dirty through too much civilization. Whenever we touch nature, we get clean.” 

You may not associate such bold, earthy sentiments with Swiss psychiatrist C.G. Jung, but he was, in fact, deeply concerned over the loss of connection with nature. He considered natural life to be the “nourishing soil of the soul.”  Who has time for a natural life these days? What would it look like if we did? Those of us destined to live through this turbulent period of history, the declining phase of Western civilization, could perhaps use a wise elder who stands slightly outside the modern world yet knows it well enough to offer guidance.

 

Jung shows the knowledge of an historian who understands how the dissociation from nature came about; he reaches out with the empathy of a healer who shares our plight; and he advises with the common sense of a country doctor how to live “in modest harmony with nature...(Click title for more)

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bonnie Bright from Ecopsychology
Scoop.it!

Chief Arvol Looking Horse | Ecocide Alert

Chief Arvol Looking Horse | Ecocide Alert | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

Chief Arvol Looking Horse, Lakota, with a Council of Indigenous Elders and Medicine Peoples, issued a statement saying mankind can no longer ignore the teachings to protect the Earth. The Indigenous Council described the destruction that has been created by man and is now out of control, including Fukushima and fracking in North America.

 

In a second statement, Amnesty International said Canada is to blame for the violations of international laws and human rights which resulted in a police attack on Mi’kmaq in a peaceful anti-fracking camp where Mi’kmaqs were defending their land.

 

In the first statement, the Indigenous Council said... (Click title for more)

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bonnie Bright from Depth Psychology
Scoop.it!

Truth Seekers: Caring for a World with a Soul

Truth Seekers: Caring for a World with a Soul | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

“There is now a single issue before us: survival. Not merely physical survival, but survival in a world of fulfillment, survival in a living world, where the violets bloom in the springtime, where the stars shine down in all their mystery, survival in a world of meaning.”

—Thomas Berry

Earth is in distress and is calling to us, sending us signs of the extremity of its imbalance through floods and storms, drought and unprecedented heat. There are now indications that its ecosystem as a whole may be approaching a “tipping point” or “state shift” of irreversible change with unforeseeable consequences. 

 

Some of us are responding to these signs, hearing this calling, individually and as groups, with ideas and actions – trying to bring our collective attention to our unsustainable materialistic lifestyle and the ways it is contributing to ecological devastation, increasing pollution, species depletion. But the momentum of our consumer, fossil-fuel driven civilization seems unstoppable, accelerating the destruction of the very ecosystem that supports us.... (Click title for more)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

We Are All Facing Extinction - Susan Griffin

We Are All Facing Extinction - Susan Griffin | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
We live in a society that pits the needs of human beings against nature.

 

In fact we are all faced with extinction. Along with forests, animals, and countless life forms, if we do not address climate change quickly, we will simply perish. Yet our awareness has been blunted. The same corporate mindset that places our welfare in conflict with the earth is also denying the gravity as well as the human causes of global warming. In complicity, too many governments and international institutions all over the world have been far too slow in responding to what becomes daily apparent to scientists as a grave danger.

 

One of the difficulties the movement to address climate change faces is that we are living in a society that is dissociated from nature in countless ways. With so many people living in cities or paved-over suburbs, often spending the great part of their lives in front of a computer screen or a television or on as assembly line in factory with no windows, the reality of our surroundings and... (Click title for more)

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bonnie Bright from Ecopsychology
Scoop.it!

Excerpts from "The 11th Hour" - Ecopsychology Documentary from Leonardo DiCaprio

Environmentalism was once the project of a passionate few. Now, millions of people have responded to ecological destruction and have created the groundwork for a sustainable and just world.

 

With the onset of global warming and other catastrophic events, environmentalism has become today a broader unifying human issue. We as citizens, leaders, consumers and voters have the opportunity to help integrate ecology into governmental policy and everyday living standards.

 

During this critical period of human history, healing the damage of industrial civilization is the task of our generation. Our response depends on the conscious evolution of our species, and this response could very well save this unique blue planet for future generations...(Click title for more)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Los Angeles Review of Books - Welcome to the Anthropocene by by David Biello

Los Angeles Review of Books - Welcome to the Anthropocene by  by David Biello | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
A new literature for a new age, the 'Age of Man'

 

We move more earth and stone than all the world's rivers. We are changing the chemistry of the atmosphere all life breathes. We are on pace to eat to death half of the other life currently sharing the planet with us. There is nothing on Earth untouched by man — whether it be the soot from fossil fuels darkening polar snows or the very molecules incorporated into a tree trunk. Humanity has become a global force whose exploits will be written in rock for millennia.

 

We can think of our Anthropocene as a steam-punk thing, only as old as James Watt's invention of a practical coal-burning steam engine way back in 1776. Or we can see it stretch back millions of years to when early Homo sapiens may have driven large carnivores like sabre-tooth tigers to extinction. Still, nothing compares to the Atomic Age, which spread rare, long-lived elements across the planet — a unique human signature. And our mark will remain in the atmosphere for tens of thousands of years, elevated levels of carbon dioxide keeping the planet warmer than it would otherwise be. If people, plants or animals don't like the climate in 2100, 2500 or even 25000 they will have us to blame....(click title for more)

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bonnie Bright from Ecopsychology
Scoop.it!

The Sixth Mass Extinction Is Upon Us. Can Humans Survive?

The Sixth Mass Extinction Is Upon Us. Can Humans Survive? | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
Five mass extinctions have nearly wiped out life on earth. The sixth is coming.

 

OVER THE past four years, bee colonies have undergone a disturbing transformation. As helpless beekeepers looked on, the machinelike efficiency of these communal insects devolved into inexplicable disorganization. Worker bees would fly away, never to return; adolescent bees wandered aimlessly in the hive; and the daily jobs in the colony were left undone until honey production stopped and eggs died of neglect. Colony collapse disorder, as it is known, has claimed roughly 30 percent of bee colonies every winter since 2007.

 

If bees go extinct, their loss will trigger an extinction domino effect, because crops from apples to broccoli rely on these insects for pollination. At the same time, over a third of the world’s amphibian species are threatened with extinction, and Harvard evolutionary biologist and conservationist E.O. Wilson estimates that 27,000 species of all kinds go extinct per year... (click title for more)

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bonnie Bright from Ecopsychology
Scoop.it!

3,000 Years of Abusing Earth on a Global Scale: Scientific American

3,000 Years of Abusing Earth on a Global Scale: Scientific American | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
A new perspective emanating from archaeology and ecology suggests that humanity has spent thousands of years making widespread and profound changes to the "natural" world

 

Wherever you go on this blue, green and white globe of ours, odds are some person has been there before you—and left a mark. That's because the hunting, farming or burning practices of our most distant ancestors have shaped most land areas on the planet, argues an interdisciplinary team of archaeologists and ecologists inProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. If we are indeed living in the Anthropocene—a new geologic epoch brought on by the outsized environmental effects of the human species—then this new interval isn't just a few hundred years old, it is older than the industrial revolution.

The researchers set out to investigate just how long human being have been profoundly changing the environment on land. "This is a super important question for the identity of humanity," argues... (click title for more)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

A Psyche the Size of Earth ~ James Hillman

A Psyche the Size of Earth ~ James Hillman | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

There is only one core issue for all of psychology. Where is the "me"? Where does the "me" begin? Where does the "me" stop? Where does the "other" begin? For most of its history, psychology took for granted an intentional subject: the biographical "me" that was the agent and sufferer of all "doings". For most of its history, psychology located this "me" within human persons defined by their physical skin and their immediate behaviour. The subject was simply "me in my body and in my relations with other subjects". The familiar term that covered this entire philosophical system was "ego", and what the ego registered were called "experiences".

Over the past three decades, all this has been scrutinized, dismantled and even junked. Postmodernism has deconstructed continuity, self, intention, identity, centrality, gender, individuality. The integrity of memory for establishing biographical continuity has been challenged. The unity of the self has fallen before the onslaught of multiple personalities.... (click title for more)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Eco-pathic

One of the things about this work is the opportunity to use words in news ways, even invent new words, to put forth ideas and concepts; indeed to offer unexpected arrangements of concepts to try to illustrate new thinking and new paradigms. Derrieck Jensen, in his book Endgame (Vol. II) offers a section on psychopathology in which he references the definition of a psychopath from the IDC-10 Classification of Mental and Behavioural Disorders, World Health Organization, Genevea, 1992, section F60.2 on Dissocial (Antisocial Personality Disorder).


f you are courageous enough, there is room for us to step out of the box we have been raised in, the paradigm of our society and culture, and begin to view broader trends in the context of ecology. When we do that, we realize something is gravely wrong. What we do next, when given the opportunity to wake up, is partly the subject here. It is precisely because we as individuals, as a culture and as a civilization, don’t do anything about it, that the label of ecopathic is justified. In this case, rather than... (click title for more)

more...
No comment yet.