Culture Collapse Disorder
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Culture Collapse Disorder
Culture Collapse Disorder
Culture Collapse Disorder: The loss & destruction of home (places & planet) due to human impact and our modern consumer mindset
Curated by Bonnie Bright
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Why Is It Taking So Long for Psychology to Go Green?

Why Is It Taking So Long for Psychology to Go Green? | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

Psychology also mostly ignores humanity's psychologically-dysfunctional relationship with nature that results in the ecodical behavior that is causing global catastrophe. In spite of abundant scientific information about the shocking effects of human actions on planetary ecosystems (our own life-support systems and the life-support systems of countless other life forms!), few psychologists concern themselves with the task of helping us understand or change that behavior.

But as Ralph Metzner reminded us in 1999, "It is in the hearts and minds of human beings that the causes and cures of the ecocatastrophe are to be found." Surely finding this cure is a task that psychologists and other mental health professionals are morally obliged to urgently undertake given our present circumstances?.... (Click title for more)

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This is what politicians debating global warming will look like soon

This is what politicians debating global warming will look like soon | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
Awesome new street art unintentionally shames our leaders into paying attention to climate change.

 

“Politicians discussing global warming” — that’s what social media users have dubbed this tiny puddle sculpture by Spanish street artist Isaac Cordal.

 

The image has gone viral in the past few days and it’s obvious why. With sea levels projected to rise up to three feet by the end of the century, it's a stark reminder of our collective failure to act on climate change.

Or maybe not.

 

As it turns out, Cordal's sculpture is actually called “electoral campaign” and it's part of a larger street art installation called “Follow the leaders.” The tiny cement figures, arranged in bleak scenes of urban disintegration, represent the faceless businessmen who run our capitalist global order.

“These pieces reflect our own decline,” says Cordal. “We live immersed in the collapse of a system that needs change.”... (Click title for more)


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Climate on the Couch

Climate on the Couch | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

Examining the psychological task of change, Mary-Jayne Rust looks at the ways in which we respond to the environmental crisis. How do old stories underlie our present reality?

 

While few people would now deny the reality of climate change and environmental crisis, many are still turning a blind eye to the situation we face. We are having great difficulty in making even the simplest of changes to our lives. The global scale of our crisis is overwhelming and it is easy to feel apathetic in response. This is made easier when our consumer lifestyles keep us well within our comfort zones.

When we do allow ourselves to feel, we might find a whole range of strong emotions, such as anxiety and fear about the future, despair at our lack of political will, grief for so many losses, guilt that we continue to be part of the cause, and more. While therapy has helped many of us to become more emotionally literate interpersonally, we are still a very stiff-upper-lip culture in relation to the bigger picture; when we block out our feelings, we lose touch with the urgency of crisis.

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Laura M. Smith's curator insight, May 17, 2014 9:39 AM

How do we move beyond the human skin to reclaim the vastness of our self?

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Unstoppable man-made climate change will make New York unihabitable

Unstoppable man-made climate change will make New York unihabitable | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

The Earth is racing towards an apocalyptic future in which major cities such as New York and London could become uninhabitable within 45-years.

 

Humanitarian crisis' could unfold, as hundreds of millions of global warming refugees pour illegally across borders fleeing the consequences of the temperature rises which might leave entire regions of the planet extinct of life.

 

And while the doomsday clock is ticking, with the first signs of change expected at the end of this decade, researchers of the study claim that it is too late to reverse and mankind needs to prepare for a world where the coldest years will be warmer than what we remember as the hottest.

 

Indeed, the study from the University of Hawaii...

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Native cultures under threat from climate change may hold the key to addressing it (Commentary)

Native cultures under threat from climate change may hold the key to addressing it (Commentary) | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

"The message that we humans are part of nature, not above it or able to control or dominate it, is central to the challenges we face.''

 

"You must learn to melt the ice in the heart of man," Angaangaq Angakkorsuaq, an Eskimo elder from Greenland, instructed us at the Ancient Voices -- Contemporary Contexts Forum in Abuqui, New Mexico last month. "Uncle," as he was affectionately called at the gathering, reported that as a result of climate change there are 78 new species of fish in the waters off his homeland. Since he was raised knowing all the fish in the waters, this is a frightening new development.

 

Uncle was one of a dozen elders sharing cultural wisdom and reflections on the climate crisis with a group of...(click title for more)

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We Are All Facing Extinction - Susan Griffin

We Are All Facing Extinction - Susan Griffin | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
We live in a society that pits the needs of human beings against nature.

 

In fact we are all faced with extinction. Along with forests, animals, and countless life forms, if we do not address climate change quickly, we will simply perish. Yet our awareness has been blunted. The same corporate mindset that places our welfare in conflict with the earth is also denying the gravity as well as the human causes of global warming. In complicity, too many governments and international institutions all over the world have been far too slow in responding to what becomes daily apparent to scientists as a grave danger.

 

One of the difficulties the movement to address climate change faces is that we are living in a society that is dissociated from nature in countless ways. With so many people living in cities or paved-over suburbs, often spending the great part of their lives in front of a computer screen or a television or on as assembly line in factory with no windows, the reality of our surroundings and... (Click title for more)

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Experts See a New Normal: A Tinderbox West, With More Huge Fires

Experts See a New Normal: A Tinderbox West, With More Huge Fires | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
Scientists said the deadly blaze in Arizona and 15 others that remained uncontained from New Mexico to California were part of a warmer trend in the West that would bring more catastrophic fires.

 

One of the deadliest wildfires in a generation vastly expanded Monday to cover more than 8,000 acres, sweeping up sharp slopes through dry scrub and gnarled piñon pines a day after fickle winds and flames killed 19 firefighters.

 

The gusty monsoon winds where the Colorado Plateau begins to drop off into the Sonoran Desert continued to bedevil about 400 firefighters who were defending 500 homes and 200 businesses in the old gold mining villages of Yarnell and Peeples Valley.

 

Scientists said those blazes and 15 others that remained uncontained from New Mexico to California and Idaho were part of the new normal — an increasingly hot and dry West, resulting in more catastrophic fires.

Since 1970, Arizona has warmed at a rate 0.72 degrees per decade, the fastest among...(click title for more)

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Is Your Brain Blocking Climate Action?

Is Your Brain Blocking Climate Action? | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
Overfishing, wildlife poaching, climate change etc., are not only causing species extinction, but also bringing human civilization closer to the brink of collapse.

 

The American minds seem to be changing as swiftly as the weather patterns according to a recent report titled "Climate Change in the American Mind Series," released by George Mason University.

 

According to the latest national survey, the percentage of Americans who believe global warming is real has dropped 7 points to 63% since Fall 2012, "likely influenced by the relatively cold winter of 2012-13 and an unusually cold March just before the survey was conducted."

 

This in contrast to the 66% who believed global warming was happening in the March 2012 survey, apparently swayed by the unusually warm winter... (click title for more)

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Plastic Bags Litter Seafloor: Scientific American Podcast

You know what's becoming more common than fish in the sea? Plastic bags.

Researchers at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute surveyed underwater video footage. They saw that plastic bags have become ubiquitous on the seafloor off the U.S. West Coast—even as far away as Hawaii.

The institute's robot subs collected the videos over the last 22 years, mostly in and around Monterey Bay but also further afield. Technicians noted whenever it showed objects or animals.

The footage spanned shallow seafloors of 25 meters or so and areas nearly 4,000 meters deep. And in all too much of...

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“Then a strange blight crept over the area..."

“Then a strange blight crept over the area..." | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

WHEN RACHEL Carson entitled her prescient 1962 book “Silent Spring,’’ she was imagining the dawning of the season without the sweet sounds of wildlife. She noted that, even then, in many parts of the United States, spring “comes unheralded by the return of birds, and the early mornings are strangely silent where once they were filled with the beauty of birdsong.’’

 

Carson’s book was heard as a resounding alarm, jumpstarting the contemporary environmental movement. In important ways, her warning was heeded (restrictions on DDT), but the human assault on the natural world only escalated in the decades since, with last week’s catastrophe in Japan a latest signal of the danger.

 

“There was once a town in the heart of America where all life seemed to live in harmony with its surroundings.’’ The book begins with what Carson calls a fable for tomorrow... (click title for more)

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Welcome to the Anthropocene

Welcome to the Anthropocene | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
THE Earth is a big thing; if you divided it up evenly among its 7 billion inhabitants, they would get almost 1 trillion tonnes each. To think that the workings of so...

 

THE Earth is a big thing; if you divided it up evenly among its 7 billion inhabitants, they would get almost 1 trillion tonnes each. To think that the workings of so vast an entity could be lastingly changed by a species that has been scampering across its surface for less than 1% of 1% of its history seems, on the face of it, absurd. But it is not. Humans have become a force of nature reshaping the planet on a geological scale—but at a far-faster-than-geological speed.

 

A single engineering project, the Syncrude mine in the Athabasca tar sands, involves moving 30 billion tonnes of earth—twice the amount of sediment that flows down all the rivers in the world in a year. That sediment flow itself, meanwhile, is shrinking; almost 50,000 large dams have over the past half- century cut the flow by nearly a fifth. That is one reason why the Earth's deltas, home to hundreds of millions of people, are eroding away faster than they can be replenished.... (click title for more)

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A World Without Coral Reefs

A World Without Coral Reefs | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
By persisting in the false belief that coral reefs have a future, we grossly misallocate the funds needed to cope with the fallout from their collapse.

 

IT’S past time to tell the truth about the state of the world’s coral reefs, the nurseries of tropical coastal fish stocks. They have become zombie ecosystems, neither dead nor truly alive in any functional sense, and on a trajectory to collapse within a human generation. There will be remnants here and there, but the global coral reef ecosystem — with its storehouse of biodiversity and fisheries supporting millions of the world’s poor — will cease to be.

 

Overfishing, ocean acidification and pollution are pushing coral reefs into oblivion. Each of those forces alone is fully capable of causing the global collapse of coral reefs; together, they assure it. The scientific evidence for this is compelling and unequivocal, but there seems to be a collective reluctance to accept the logical conclusion — that there is no hope of saving the global coral reef ecosystem...

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Why Warming Oceans Could Mean Dwindling Fish | TIME.com

Why Warming Oceans Could Mean Dwindling Fish | TIME.com | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
Scientists knew that climate change would eventually impact fisheries, but new research indicates that warming water is already affecting the kind of fish that end up on your dinner table.

 

It’s easy to forget that global warming doesn’t just refer to the rising temperature of the air. Climate change is having an enormous, if less well understood, impact on the oceans, which already absorb far more carbon dioxide than the atmosphere. Like so much of what goes on in the vast depths that cover more than two-thirds of our planet’s surface, the effect of climate change on the oceans remains a black box—albeit one that scientists are working to illuminate.

 

Here’s one way: fisheries. Wild fish remain a major source of protein for humanity—as well as a major source of reality TV shows—and for some coastal communities, fish mean even more. Scientists aren’t clear about what climate change, including the warming of the oceans, will have on wild fisheries...


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New Study: Global Warming Has Doubled The Risk Of Extreme Winters In Europe

New Study: Global Warming Has Doubled The Risk Of Extreme Winters In Europe | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

Global warming has doubled the chances that any given winter in Europe or northern Asia will be unusually severe, according to new research.

 

Specifically, temperatures have risen at the poles much faster than around the rest of the planet, leading to the collapse of Arctic sea ice coverage and altering weather patterns in the northern hemisphere. The research was recently published in Nature Geoscience, and relied on a the combined output of 100 different simulations — “the most comprehensive computer modeling study to date,” as The Guardian put it.

Several recent severe winters in Europe have already been associated with the recent years where the melting of the Arctic ice cap was most severe. And by the 2030s, the Arctic is expected to be completely free of ice in the late summer... (click title for more)

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Climate change psychology: Coping and creating solutions

Climate change psychology: Coping and creating solutions | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

Psychologists are offering new insight and solutions to help counter climate change, while helping people cope with the environmental, economic and health impacts already taking a toll on people's lives, according to a special issue of American Psychologist, the American Psychological Association's flagship journal.

 

Climate change "poses significant risks for -- and in many cases is already affecting -- a broad range of human and natural systems," according to the May-June issue's introductory article, "Psychology's Contributions to Understanding and Addressing Global Climate Change." The authors call upon psychologists to increase research and work closely with industry, government and education to address climate change.

 

The role psychologists can play may be different from what many people expect. "Psychological contributions to limiting climate change will come not from trying to change people's attitudes, but by helping..(Click title for more)

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Fighting Despair to Fight Climate Change

Fighting Despair to Fight Climate Change | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

Without hope, the horror of climate change paralyzes rather than politicizes.

 

There is a brutal conundrum at the heart of the fight against catastrophic climate change: when people grasp just how dire things are, they’re as likely to hunker down as to rise up. Maybe more likely.

 

A haunting New York Times Magazine story demonstrates this. It’s about Paul Kingsnorth, a onetime environmental activist who has essentially given up, devoting himself instead to a multifaceted project of grief and survival called Dark Mountain. “Everything had gotten worse,” Kingsnorth told writer Daniel Smith. “You look at every trend that environmentalists like me have been trying to stop for 50 years, and every single thing had gotten worse. And I thought: I can’t do this anymore. I can’t sit here saying: ‘Yes, comrades, we must act! We only need one more push, and we’ll save the world!’ I don’t believe it. I don’t believe it! So what do I do?”

 

What Kingsnorth did was draft an apocalyptic manifesto, titled Uncivilisation. “It is, it seems, our civilisation’s turn to experience the inrush of the savage and the unseen; our turn to be brought up short by contact with untamed reality,” he wrote. “There is a fall coming... (Click title for more)

 

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Declining Bee Populations Pose A Threat to Global Agriculture

Declining Bee Populations Pose A Threat to Global Agriculture | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
The danger that the decline of bees and other pollinators represents to the world’s food supply was highlighted this week when the European Commission decided to ban a class of pesticides suspected of playing a role in so-called “colony collapse disorder.”

 

One of every three bites of food eaten worldwide depends on pollinators, especially bees, for a successful harvest. And in the past several months, a scramble in California’s almond groves has given the world a taste of what may lie in store for food production if the widespread — and still puzzling — decimation of bee colonies continues. 

For much of the past 10 years, beekeepers, primarily in the United States and Europe, have been reporting annual hive losses of 30 percent or higher, substantially more than is considered normal or sustainable. But this winter... (click title for more)

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Chief Arvol Looking Horse | Ecocide Alert

Chief Arvol Looking Horse | Ecocide Alert | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

Chief Arvol Looking Horse, Lakota, with a Council of Indigenous Elders and Medicine Peoples, issued a statement saying mankind can no longer ignore the teachings to protect the Earth. The Indigenous Council described the destruction that has been created by man and is now out of control, including Fukushima and fracking in North America.

 

In a second statement, Amnesty International said Canada is to blame for the violations of international laws and human rights which resulted in a police attack on Mi’kmaq in a peaceful anti-fracking camp where Mi’kmaqs were defending their land.

 

In the first statement, the Indigenous Council said... (Click title for more)

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Fracking Vs. The Drought: They Call It Texas Tea, But You Can’t Drink Oil

Fracking Vs. The Drought: They Call It Texas Tea, But You Can’t Drink Oil | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
How dry is it in Texas? So dry that many Texans are now against using water to frack for oil.

 

Every fracking job requires several million gallons of water. “Only about 20 percent to 25 percent on average of the water is recovered, while the rest disappears underground, never to be seen again.” Fracking is probably not the wisest use of water anywhere, but in a drought it’s downright self-destructive.

 

In one South Texas county, fracking was nearly one quarter of total water use in 2011, a fraction that is expected to hit one third soon. The Texas Water Development Board estimates frackers used 13.5 billion gallons water used in 2010, a number they project to more than double by 2020!... (Click title for more)

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Ecopsychology in Ten Easy Lessons

Ecopsychology in Ten Easy Lessons | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

What are the trees saying? I am listening closely. Listening, as I have been advised, with the whole of my being. Trying to hear a voice, this voice of the trees, this voice I’ve traveled so far to hear. And it has arrived, finally, wandering up through the branches, carried by the wind, this voice so very old. What is it saying? The message is simple and clear. It’s saying: “Hey buddy, you’re fucked.”

 

Fucked is truly what I am—though perhaps not technically. Technically, I’m bushwhacking across one of the planet’s last true wilds, lost in the southern portion of South America named Patagonia by Magellan. What I wanted was a place untouched by man or machine—a place that has never seen a can of Coca-Cola. Instead, what I got was caught in the worst storm in a decade: freezing rain, blinding snow, winds gusting up to a hundred miles per hour. And this would be bad enough, but the real reason... (click title for more) 

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Climate change impacting food supply in Ghana

Climate change impacting food supply in Ghana | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
Nearly 700,000 people in Ghana are staring at hunger as climate change has started taking a toll on food security in this West African nation of 25 million people, a survey shows.

 

"Severe warming, floods and drought may reduce crop yields. Livestock may be at risk, both directly from heat stress and indirectly from reduced quality of their food supply, while fisheries would be affected by changes in water temperature," Hans Adu-Dapaah, director of theCrop Research Institute (CRI), told IANS. 

He said evidence of climate change in Ghana was that the mean annual temperature had...(click title for more)

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What is Culture Collapse Disorder? Ecopsychopathy and the End of Culture as We Know It

What is Culture Collapse Disorder? Ecopsychopathy and the End of Culture as We Know It | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
Industrial waste Earth’s inhabitants are in peril largely of our own making. We are, consciously or unconsciously, systematically destroying our home places, habitats, ecosystems, and above all, the only home we collectively know: earth.

 

Reports are emerging daily about the implications of human impact on our environment, presenting dire warnings about pollution, urban development, greenhouse gas emissions, climate change, natural disasters, and displacement. The tally of global losses grows daily as we perpetrate ecological destruction through our relentless consumption of the earth’s dwindling resources; through rampant use of toxins, chemicals, and pesticides; and through deforestation, erosion, and devastation of natural ecosystems, wetlands, rivers, and oceans.

 

The unchecked demands of a burgeoning human population on the planet are initiating conditions that... (click title for more)

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Cornstalks Everywhere But Nothing Else, Not Even A Bee : NPR

Cornstalks Everywhere But Nothing Else, Not Even A Bee : NPR | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
You can go to almost any cubic foot of ocean, stream, coral, backyard, ice shelves even, and if you look, you'll find scores of little animals and plants busy making a living.

 

...There were 30 different plants in that one square foot of grass, and roughly 70 different insects. And the coolest part, said a researcher to the Guardian in Britain, "If we picked the cube up and walked 10 feet, we could get as much as 50 percent difference in plant species we encountered. If we moved it uphill, we might find none of the species." Populations changed drastically only a few feet away — and that's not counting the fungi, microbes, and the itsy-bitsies that Liittschwager and his team couldn't see.

 

Another example: Here's a cube placed 100 feet off the ground, in the upper branches of a Strangler fig tree in Costa Rica. We're up in the air here, looking down into a valley... (click title for more)

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Los Angeles Review of Books - Welcome to the Anthropocene by by David Biello

Los Angeles Review of Books - Welcome to the Anthropocene by  by David Biello | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
A new literature for a new age, the 'Age of Man'

 

We move more earth and stone than all the world's rivers. We are changing the chemistry of the atmosphere all life breathes. We are on pace to eat to death half of the other life currently sharing the planet with us. There is nothing on Earth untouched by man — whether it be the soot from fossil fuels darkening polar snows or the very molecules incorporated into a tree trunk. Humanity has become a global force whose exploits will be written in rock for millennia.

 

We can think of our Anthropocene as a steam-punk thing, only as old as James Watt's invention of a practical coal-burning steam engine way back in 1776. Or we can see it stretch back millions of years to when early Homo sapiens may have driven large carnivores like sabre-tooth tigers to extinction. Still, nothing compares to the Atomic Age, which spread rare, long-lived elements across the planet — a unique human signature. And our mark will remain in the atmosphere for tens of thousands of years, elevated levels of carbon dioxide keeping the planet warmer than it would otherwise be. If people, plants or animals don't like the climate in 2100, 2500 or even 25000 they will have us to blame....(click title for more)

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IPS – Indigenous Nicaraguans Fight to the Death for Their Last Forest | Inter Press Service

IPS – Indigenous Nicaraguans Fight to the Death for Their Last Forest | Inter Press Service | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
Indigenous Nicaraguans Fight to the Death for Their Last Forest - Indigenous communities in northern Nicaragua are demanding that the authorities take urgent action to halt the attacks on their lives and territory by illegal invaders.

 

The Mayangna live from hunting and fishing, domestic livestock raising and subsistence agriculture, growing crops like corn, beans and tubers with traditional methods. But their way of life has been severely impacted by the invading farmers.
 

“They shoot everything, burn everything, poison the water in the rivers, and chop down the giant trees that have given us shade and protection for years, and then they continue their advance, and nothing stops them,” said Genaro.

 

“You don’t see tapirs anymore, the pumas and oncillas (tiger cats) have fled the area, you no longer hear the singing of the thousands of birds that used to tell us when it was going to rain. Even the big fish in the rivers are gone. Everything is disappearing...(click title for more)

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