Culture Collapse Disorder
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Culture Collapse Disorder
Culture Collapse Disorder
Culture Collapse Disorder: The loss & destruction of home (places & planet) due to human impact and our modern consumer mindset
Curated by Bonnie Bright
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The Change Within: The Obstacles We Face Are Not Just External ~Naomi Klein

The Change Within: The Obstacles We Face Are Not Just External ~Naomi Klein | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
The climate crisis has such bad timing, confronting it not only requires a new economy but a new way of thinking.

 

› Climate change is place-based, and we are everywhere at once. The problem is not just that we are moving too quickly. It is also that the terrain on which the changes are taking place is intensely local: an early blooming of a particular flower, an unusually thin layer of ice on a lake, the late arrival of a migratory bird. Noticing those kinds of subtle changes requires an intimate connection to a specific ecosystem. That kind of communion happens only when we know a place deeply, not just as scenery but also as sustenance, and when local knowledge is passed on with a sense of sacred trust from one generation to the next... (Click title for more)

 

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Review of Thomas Berry's "The Great Work"

Review of Thomas Berry's "The Great Work" | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

In this review essay, Thomas Berry's The Great Work is contextualized within Berry's overarching cosmological project. Special attention is paid to Berry's critique of economic corporations, as well as his interpretation of globalization and his assessment of an alleged decline of the nation state, claims that run counter to certain contemporary social scientific research offering more complex depictions of such phenomena. The critique of democracy in Berry's work, and its potential implications, is also critically addressed.

 

"What happens to the outer world happens to the inner world," Berry avers. "If the outer world is diminished in its grandeur than the emotional, imaginative, intellectual, and spiritual life of the human is diminished or extinguished" (p. 200).

 

Our inner being will die if we continue to transform natural beauty into the soul-deadening, concrete-laden, box-store landscapes of a consumer society. "Our quest for wonderworld," Berry tersely observes, "is creating a waste-world" (p. 68). "Without the soaring birds, the great forests, the sounds and coloration of the insects, the free-flowing streams, the flowering fields, the sight of the clouds by day and the stars at night, we become impoverished in all that makes us human" (p. 200).

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Unstoppable man-made climate change will make New York unihabitable

Unstoppable man-made climate change will make New York unihabitable | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

The Earth is racing towards an apocalyptic future in which major cities such as New York and London could become uninhabitable within 45-years.

 

Humanitarian crisis' could unfold, as hundreds of millions of global warming refugees pour illegally across borders fleeing the consequences of the temperature rises which might leave entire regions of the planet extinct of life.

 

And while the doomsday clock is ticking, with the first signs of change expected at the end of this decade, researchers of the study claim that it is too late to reverse and mankind needs to prepare for a world where the coldest years will be warmer than what we remember as the hottest.

 

Indeed, the study from the University of Hawaii...

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The Deep Ecology Movement

The Deep Ecology Movement | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

In 1973, Norwegian philosopher and mountaineer Arne Naess introduced the phrase “deep ecology” to environmental literature. Environmentalism had emerged as a popular grassroots political movement in the 1960s with the publication of Rachel Carson's book Silent Spring. 

 

Those already involved in conservation and preservation efforts were now joined by many others concerned about the detrimental environmental effects of modern industrial technology. The longer-range, older originators of the movement included writers and activists like Henry David Thoreau, John Muir and Aldo Leopold; more mainstream awareness was closer to the “wise-use” conservation philosophy pioneered by Gifford Pinchot.

 

In 1972, Naess made a presentation in Bucharest at the Third World Future Research Conference. In his talk, he discussed the longer-range background of the ecology movement and its concern with an ethic respecting nature and the inherent worth of other beings. As a mountaineer who had climbed all over the world, Naess had enjoyed the opportunity to observe ... (Click title for more)

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We Are All Facing Extinction - Susan Griffin

We Are All Facing Extinction - Susan Griffin | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
We live in a society that pits the needs of human beings against nature.

 

In fact we are all faced with extinction. Along with forests, animals, and countless life forms, if we do not address climate change quickly, we will simply perish. Yet our awareness has been blunted. The same corporate mindset that places our welfare in conflict with the earth is also denying the gravity as well as the human causes of global warming. In complicity, too many governments and international institutions all over the world have been far too slow in responding to what becomes daily apparent to scientists as a grave danger.

 

One of the difficulties the movement to address climate change faces is that we are living in a society that is dissociated from nature in countless ways. With so many people living in cities or paved-over suburbs, often spending the great part of their lives in front of a computer screen or a television or on as assembly line in factory with no windows, the reality of our surroundings and... (Click title for more)

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NPR : Interview with Wade Davis, On the Edge of Timbuktu, Radio Expeditions

NPR : Interview with Wade Davis, On the Edge of Timbuktu, Radio Expeditions | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

NPR's Alex Chadwick: How long have you been working on the ethnosphere project as an idea? 

Wade Davis: I coined the term ethnosphere in a recent book, Light at the Edge of the World. The thought was to come up with a concept that would suggest to people that just as there is a biosphere, a biological web of life, so too there is a cultural fabric that envelops the Earth, a cultural web of life. You might think of the ethnosphere as being the sum total of all thoughts and dreams, myths, intuitions and inspirations brought into being by the human imagination since the dawn of consciousness. The ethnosphere is humanity's great legacy. It is the product of our dreams, the embodiment of our hopes, the symbol of all that we are and all that we have created as a wildly inquisitive and astonishingly adaptive species. 

And just as the biosphere, the biological matrix of life, is today being severely compromised, so too is the ethnosphere. Only if anything at a far greater rate of loss. No biologist, for example, would dare suggest that 50 percent of all species of plant and animal are moribund or on the brink of extinction. Yet this, the most apocalyptic projection... (click title for more)

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We'll save energy if the neighbours do first

We'll save energy if the neighbours do first | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

Across America, a number of homeowners are beginning to reduce their household energy usage. But why?

 

It seems like a simple question with an obvious answer:  those who conserve energy are probably doing so either to save money or to reduce their impact on the environment. But, as with many issues involving human decision-making, the reality is not that simple.

 

Researcher Robert Cialdini and colleagues wanted to find out the real reasons why homeowners conserved energy. To do so, they conducted a telephone survey in which they asked people to rank how important four different factors were in their decision to conserve. Those who answered the survey ranked the four factors in this order of most to least important:  environmental concern; helping society; saving money; and because others do it. Yet when... (click title for more)

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The Gaia Foundation Exposes The True Cost of Hi-Tech

The Gaia Foundation Exposes The True Cost of Hi-Tech | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

There are hundreds of components in each of these gadgets, using dozens of metals and minerals. The path each component takes from the Earth to be extracted, smelted and processed criss-crosses the planet through complex routes that companies fail – or refuse – to track.


A new report from the Gaia Foundation and allies exposes how the accelerating consumption and wasteful disposal of our electronic gadgets is leading to growing ecological and materials crises. “Short Circuit: the Lifecycle of our Electronic Gadgets and the True Cost to Earth” was launched last week in the Houses of Parliament, alongside the London Mining Network, Friends of the Earth and the Great Recovery project. The report has been produced in collaboration with the African Biodiversity Network and others.


With the number of mobile-connected devices projected to exceed the number of humans on Earth by the end of 2013, the report draws attention to the vast and accelerating amount of metals and minerals that are being mined from the Earth for these gadgets, only to quickly return as wasted and toxic landfill.... (click title for more)

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Nature Has No 'Outside'— Navigating the Ecological Self

Nature Has No 'Outside'— Navigating the Ecological Self | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

In nature, it is concretely evident how everything is interrelated. We can look at any aspect of the environment and see and name hundreds or even thousands of relationships with other facets of the environment. No man is a silo, yet the individual of Descartes’ vision required a strong, self-directing ego as the optimum situation for success and well-being.

 

Rather than continuing to propagate and strengthen the illusion of the “individual,” it is critical to reconceptualize it, embracing instead an image of an ecology of the psyche, a system that encompasses all, traversing human-conceived boundaries of time, culture, and species. In truth, we each carry various elements of “other” within us: spirits of ancestors long since gone, traditions and ritual from distant peoples we know nothing about, and energetic archetypes from the natural world... (click title for more)

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Maintaining Mental Health In The Age Of Madness, By Carolyn Baker

Maintaining Mental Health In The Age Of Madness, By Carolyn Baker | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

The World Health Organization defines mental health as “a state of well-being in which every individual realizes his or her own potential, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and fruitfully, and is able to make a contribution to her or his community.” A state of well-being is obviously more than just the absence of disease. It assumes that a human being is reasonably functional mentally, physically, emotionally, and spiritually. Similarly, this definition can be applied to healthy communities with the addition of social functionality as another aspect of well-being.

 

However, most readers are aware of the decline in mental health treatment within the past three decades. Whereas thirty years ago many working people had insurance benefits for outpatient psychotherapy as well as in-patient treatment, not only have the benefits dramatically decreased, but massive unemployment makes it virtually impossible for.. (click title for more)

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Ending the Silence on Climate Change--BillMoyers with Scientist Anthony Leiserowitz

Ending the Silence on Climate Change--BillMoyers with Scientist Anthony Leiserowitz | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

Why climate change gets the silent treatment, and what we should do about it.

 

Scientist Anthony Leiserowitz, director of the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication, joins Bill to describe his efforts to galvanize communities over what’s arguably the greatest single threat facing humanity. Leiserowitz, who specializes in the psychology of risk perception, knows better than anyone if people are willing to change their behavior to make a difference.

 

“[A] pervasive sense up to now has been that climate change is distant — distant in time, and distant in space,” Leiserowitz tells Bill. “And what we’re now beginning to see is that it’s not so distant. I have a nine-year-old son — he’s going to be my age in the year 2050. I don’t want him to live in the world that we’re currently hurtling towards...." (Click title for more)

 

 

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Gabor Maté: Breaking Through A Toxic Climate

Gabor Maté: Breaking Through A Toxic Climate | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

The physician, author and advocate of illegal (in Canada) psychedelics explores how our culture makes us sick


Gabor Maté's latest work is interested in examining societal factors that contribute to a climate of toxicity, a culture that is inherently disconnected and vacuous. He aims to shine a light on these dark corners of human experience so that we can start to challenge our assumptions about how society can be and how we ourselves can change our minds.

 

What is behind your latest focus - Toxic Culture: How Materialistic Society Makes us Ill?

All my work has been around understanding why human dysfunction happens. Not looking at causes - not at people’s pre-dispositions or genetic inheritance - but what actually happens in people’s lives. We know now that the determinants of health - whether we’re talking physical health, emotional – has a lot to do with people’s life experiences. So I’ve been...(Click title for more)

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Peru declares environmental state of emergency in its rainforest

Peru declares environmental state of emergency in its rainforest | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
Government reports high levels of barium, lead, chrome and petroleum-related compounds in region that is home to oil field

 

Peru has declared an environmental state of emergency in a remote part of its northern Amazon rainforest, home for decades to one of the country's biggest oil fields, currently operated by the Argentinian company Pluspetrol.

 

Achuar and Kichwa indigenous people living in the Pastaza river basin near Peru's border with Ecuador have complained for decades about thepollution, while successive governments have failed to deal with it. Officials indicate that for years the state lacked the required environmental quality standards... (click title for more)

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Welcome to the Anthropocene

Welcome to the Anthropocene | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

When I was a boy, we lived in the Holocene. That’s what the geologists called it, anyway, from the Greek words for  “entirely new.” The term was settled on in 1885 and defined as the geological epoch that followed the end of the Pleistocene about 12,000 years ago, after the retreat of the ice from the northern hemisphere, as the planet entered one of its periodic interglacial periods.  The Holocene, a relatively mild, even balmy, period, saw the rise of human civilization—indeed, all of recorded human history.  Bet we’ll miss it when it’s gone.

 

Almost two centuries after the beginning of the industrial revolution in Europe, an ecologist named Eugene F. Stoermer coined the word “anthropocene” to refer to the evidence of the human impact on the planet, an impact he judged to be on par with the great geological events of the past. The word means the “human new.” He started using the word in the early 1980s, but it didn’t catch on until 2000, when he and Paul Crutzen used the word in print for the first time.  While not officially adopted... (click title for more)

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Climate change psychology: Coping and creating solutions

Climate change psychology: Coping and creating solutions | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

Psychologists are offering new insight and solutions to help counter climate change, while helping people cope with the environmental, economic and health impacts already taking a toll on people's lives, according to a special issue of American Psychologist, the American Psychological Association's flagship journal.

 

Climate change "poses significant risks for -- and in many cases is already affecting -- a broad range of human and natural systems," according to the May-June issue's introductory article, "Psychology's Contributions to Understanding and Addressing Global Climate Change." The authors call upon psychologists to increase research and work closely with industry, government and education to address climate change.

 

The role psychologists can play may be different from what many people expect. "Psychological contributions to limiting climate change will come not from trying to change people's attitudes, but by helping..(Click title for more)

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The Earth Has a Soul: C.G. Jung on Nature, Technology & Modern Life by Meredith Sabini

The Earth Has a Soul: C.G. Jung on Nature, Technology & Modern Life by Meredith Sabini | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

Restoring Nature's Divinity
“Matter in the wrong place is dirt. People get dirty through too much civilization. Whenever we touch nature, we get clean.” 

You may not associate such bold, earthy sentiments with Swiss psychiatrist C.G. Jung, but he was, in fact, deeply concerned over the loss of connection with nature. He considered natural life to be the “nourishing soil of the soul.”  Who has time for a natural life these days? What would it look like if we did? Those of us destined to live through this turbulent period of history, the declining phase of Western civilization, could perhaps use a wise elder who stands slightly outside the modern world yet knows it well enough to offer guidance.

 

Jung shows the knowledge of an historian who understands how the dissociation from nature came about; he reaches out with the empathy of a healer who shares our plight; and he advises with the common sense of a country doctor how to live “in modest harmony with nature...(Click title for more)

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Judging the Merits of a Media-Hyped 'Collapse' Study - "Collide-a-Scape"

Judging the Merits of a Media-Hyped 'Collapse' Study - "Collide-a-Scape" | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

Anthropologists are loathe to make sweeping generalizations about the dissolution and/or reorganization of prehistoric cultures. This hasn’t stopped popular narratives about carrying capacity from taking hold and remaining immune to mounting evidence that challenges prevailing views....

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Let a Thousand Flowers Bloom: A History of Ecopsychology

Social historian Theodore Roszak gave the first public definition of the field of ecopsychology in his book Voice of the Earth (Roszak, 1992). Many of the central ideas of ecopsychology can also be found in his earlier work (Roszak, 1979). Further elaboration of the field took place with the publication in 1995 of Ecopsychology: Restoring the Earth Healing the Mind. This impressive collection of papers edited by Roszak, Mary Gomes, and Allen Kanner is highly recommended to anyone looking for an introductory overview of the field of ecopsychology.

 

The apparent richness and variety of the contributions to Ecopsychology are somewhat deceptive, however. Of the 26 papers in Ecopsychology, only one seems to have been written by an academic psychologist and only one by a scientific ecologist. With a few exceptions, the rest emphasize only two views of psychology- psychodynamic and transpersonal. Roszak’s version of ecopsychology and the representation in the collection could perhaps better be described as... (click title for more)

 

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What is Culture Collapse Disorder? Ecopsychopathy and the End of Culture as We Know It

What is Culture Collapse Disorder? Ecopsychopathy and the End of Culture as We Know It | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
Industrial waste Earth’s inhabitants are in peril largely of our own making. We are, consciously or unconsciously, systematically destroying our home places, habitats, ecosystems, and above all, the only home we collectively know: earth.

 

Reports are emerging daily about the implications of human impact on our environment, presenting dire warnings about pollution, urban development, greenhouse gas emissions, climate change, natural disasters, and displacement. The tally of global losses grows daily as we perpetrate ecological destruction through our relentless consumption of the earth’s dwindling resources; through rampant use of toxins, chemicals, and pesticides; and through deforestation, erosion, and devastation of natural ecosystems, wetlands, rivers, and oceans.

 

The unchecked demands of a burgeoning human population on the planet are initiating conditions that... (click title for more)

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You are a chemical guinea pig for Big Business -- whether you like it or not

You are a chemical guinea pig for Big Business -- whether you like it or not | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
Today, we are all unwitting subjects in the largest set of drug trials ever.

 

A hidden epidemic is poisoning America. The toxins are in the air we breathe and the water we drink, in the walls of our homes and the furniture within them. We can’t escape it in our cars. It’s in cities and suburbs. It afflicts rich and poor, young and old. And there’s a reason why you’ve never read about it in the newspaper or seen a report on the nightly news: It has no name — and no antidote.

 

The culprit behind this silent killer is lead. And vinyl. And formaldehyde. And asbestos. And Bisphenol A. And polychlorinated biphenyls. And thousands more innovations brought to us by the industries that once promised “better living through chemistry,” but instead produced a toxic stew that has made every American a guinea pig and has turned the United States into one grand unnatural experiment...(click title for more)

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A Psyche the Size of Earth ~ James Hillman

A Psyche the Size of Earth ~ James Hillman | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

There is only one core issue for all of psychology. Where is the "me"? Where does the "me" begin? Where does the "me" stop? Where does the "other" begin? For most of its history, psychology took for granted an intentional subject: the biographical "me" that was the agent and sufferer of all "doings". For most of its history, psychology located this "me" within human persons defined by their physical skin and their immediate behaviour. The subject was simply "me in my body and in my relations with other subjects". The familiar term that covered this entire philosophical system was "ego", and what the ego registered were called "experiences".

Over the past three decades, all this has been scrutinized, dismantled and even junked. Postmodernism has deconstructed continuity, self, intention, identity, centrality, gender, individuality. The integrity of memory for establishing biographical continuity has been challenged. The unity of the self has fallen before the onslaught of multiple personalities.... (click title for more)

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Spirituality & Practice: Book Excerpt: The Dream of the Earth, by Thomas Berry

Spirituality & Practice: Book Excerpt: The Dream of the Earth, by Thomas Berry | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it

An Excerpt from The Dream of the Earth by Thomas Berry

 

In this classic work of eco-theology, Thomas Berry spells out the lineaments of a new intimacy and love of the earth. Here is an excerpt on the spiritual practice of reverence.

 

"It is important that we be mindful of the earth, the planet out of which we are born and by which we are nourished, guided, healed — the planet, however, which we have abused to a considerable degree in these past two centuries of industrial exploitation. This exploitation has reached such extremes that presently it appears that some hundreds of thousands of species will be extinguished before the end of the century.

 

"It is indeed true that species become extinct in the natural processes whereby the great variety of lifeforms have developed over the centuries, for there is a violent as well as a benign aspect of nature. Yet in the larger pattern of life development over hundreds of millions of years, new species have appeared in... (click title for more)

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More Diagnoses of A.D.H.D. Causing Concern

More Diagnoses of A.D.H.D. Causing Concern | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
A marked rise over the last decade in diagnoses of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder could fuel growing concern that the diagnosis and its medication are overused in American children.
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Nearly one in five high school age boys in the United States and 11 percent of school-age children over all have received a medical diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, according to new data from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

 

These rates reflect a marked rise over the last decade and could fuel growing concern among many doctors that the A.D.H.D. diagnosis and its medication are overused in American children.

 

The figures showed that an estimated 6.4 million children ages 4 through 17 had received an A.D.H.D. diagnosis at some point in their lives, a...(click title to continue).

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Katherine Rowland: Whole Earth Mental Health

Katherine Rowland: Whole Earth Mental Health | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
The evolving field of ecopsychology aims to cure what ails us by bridging the human-nature rift.

 

Oregon-based clinical psychologist Thomas Doherty has been at the forefront of efforts to usher the field into the realm of academic credibility. One of the directors of the American Psychological Association’s recently established Climate Change Task Force, Doherty is encouraging his mental health colleagues to address the psychic damage caused by ecological decline and the modern world’s insistent separateness from nature.

 

“Ecopsychology is not a discipline, so much as it is a social movement, a world view,” he says. Although practitioners have evolved a number of diverse treatment methods, from conducting therapy sessions out of doors to helping clients grieve toxic spills and species loss, Doherty says one of the unifying ideas in ecopsychology is its attempt to integrate a different set of questions into clinical practice. What, for example, does it mean to live as part of the web of life, but to behave as if we... (click title for more)

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The Conquest of Nature--and What We've Lost

The Conquest of Nature--and What We've Lost | Culture Collapse Disorder | Scoop.it
Over the course of the last two centuries, animals have become all but invisible in the American scheme of things, drummed out of the society of their myth-making companions, gone from the rural as well as the urban landscape.


London housewife Barbara Carter won a “grant a wish” charity contest, and said she wanted to kiss and cuddle a lion. Wednesday night she was in a hospital in shock and with throat wounds. Mrs. Carter, forty-six, was taken to the lions’ compound of the Safari Park at Bewdley Wednesday. As she bent forward to stroke the lioness, Suki, it pounced and dragged her to the ground. Wardens later said, “We seem to have made a bad error of judgment.”

-- British news bulletin, 1976

 

Having once made a similar error of judgment with an Australian koala, I know it to be the one the textbooks define as the failure to grasp the distinction between an animal as an agent of nature and an animal as a symbol of culture. The koala was supposed to be affectionate, comforting, and cute. Of this I was certain because it was the creature of my own invention that for two weeks in the spring of 1959 I’d been presenting to readers of the San Francisco Examiner prior to its release by the Australian government into the custody of the Fleishacker Zoo... (click title to read more)

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