Cultural Infusion
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The changing shape of women in Japan. 

The changing shape of women in Japan.  | Cultural Infusion | Scoop.it

Many Japanese women are finding themselves at a cross roads due to changes in attitude and the need to find balance. 

Cultural Infusion's insight:

How Japanese women are dealing with the dilemma of staying home to raise a family, or re-joining the workforce to contribute to economic growth.

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Sudan gets creative with waste at Khartoum's first recycling festival | Zeinab Mohammed Salih

Sudan gets creative with waste at Khartoum's first recycling festival | Zeinab Mohammed Salih | Cultural Infusion | Scoop.it

From tyre chairs to newspaper art, people in Khartoum are finding innovative ways to attempt to tackle the country’s rubbish problem. 

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Homegrown contemporary flamenco comes to Western Sydney, May 5-7 2016

PHOTO CREDITS:

 

LEFT:

FORGE – Annalouise Paul – Theatre of Rhythm and Dance

Photo credit: Robert Young

 

RIGHT:

BUSH BAILANDO – Pepa Molina – Compañia Pepa Molina

Photo credit: Tom Holland

Costume credit: Yaiza Panillos

Cultural Infusion's insight:

For more info on Flamenco NOW go to:

Flamenco NOW POZIBLE campaign

Facebook event page

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First Day: The pioneering surgeon who came to Australia on a leaky boat

First Day: The pioneering surgeon who came to Australia on a leaky boat | Cultural Infusion | Scoop.it
It’s hard to say exactly what was the first day Dr Munjed Al Muderis spent in Australia. Was it the day he arrived at Christmas Island, an Australian territory, after a hellish 36 hours at sea crammed together with more than 100 other people on a leaky boat? Was it the day he was brought to the Australian mainland, taken to an immigration detention centre and issued with a number that would be used as his name for the next 10 months?
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How one group of refugees turned their plight into a musical tour

How one group of refugees turned their plight into a musical tour | Cultural Infusion | Scoop.it
Syrian rock band Khebez Dawle sought refuge in Europe like thousands of other refugees, but played gigs and sold records along the way
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Micro Matter: Vertical Dwellings Inside Glass Test Tubes

Micro Matter: Vertical Dwellings Inside Glass Test Tubes | Cultural Infusion | Scoop.it
For her series Micro Matter, Amsterdam-based designer and art director Rosa de Jong created towering houses and tall buildings inside the narrow confines of large glass test tubes. Perhaps comparable to a ship in bottle, the little houses and buildings are all handmade using natural objects and so
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Free Music Lessons Strike A Chord For At-Risk Kids

Free Music Lessons Strike A Chord For At-Risk Kids | Cultural Infusion | Scoop.it
John and Katrina Vowell used their small savings to start Major Chords for Minors in Saginaw, Mich., because they were worried about the city's youth. Now they have 130 students and a long wait list.
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Dealing with diversity in the classroom

Dealing with diversity in the classroom | Cultural Infusion | Scoop.it

Learning world


Today’s news is overwhelmed with questions on multiculturalism, diversity and peace. In this edition we take a look at how education can play a very

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Man quits job to pursue sand art.

Man quits job to pursue sand art. | Cultural Infusion | Scoop.it

Imagine having the art you spent hours cultivating was destroyed soon after completion, For 44 year old San Francisco artist Andres Amador, who creates sand paintings which can be up to 100,000 square feet inside, this is a reality. 

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InKrewsive Dance Exhibit.

InKrewsive Dance Exhibit. | Cultural Infusion | Scoop.it

Wild at Heart, one of Australia’s leading community arts companies, presents InKrewSive, a hip hop show that explores belonging and exclusion where dancers and rappers go head-to-head in an epic hip hop battle with a powerful message.

InKrewSive is a unique collaboration between Wild at Heart’s 2 Hot 2 Handle hip hop crew who experience disability, students from Essendon North Primary School and young dancers from diverse cultural backgrounds from Cultural Infusion’s Mayibuye dance crew.

The show will also feature performances by Australia’s leading hip hop crew Wickid Force with high energy rap and dance battles.

Featuring professional and community based hip hop dance crews and MCs, this compelling performance celebrates the diversity of our community and music’s ability to break through barriers in society.

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Global Citizen Festival performer will be the next Princess Elsa

Global Citizen Festival performer will be the next Princess Elsa | Cultural Infusion | Scoop.it
Calling all Frozen lovers! The Hindi version has arrived.
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Gender Equality Can't Be A Token Gift

Gender Equality Can't Be A Token Gift | Cultural Infusion | Scoop.it
Together we must look at how we are failing women. We must make changes and begin initiatives to do better -- to get on with the business of truly treating them as equals. When we get it right we can transform the world, and only then can we afford to stop talking about women.
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Two Day Wedding highlights unique Bulgarian culture

Two Day Wedding highlights unique Bulgarian culture | Cultural Infusion | Scoop.it
Fatme Robova and Refat Atipov are married amid a festival of colors and gifts in Ribnovo, a small village situated atop the Rhodope Mountains in Bulgaria.
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Ghana leaves secondhand fridges out in bid to save energy | Global Development. 

Ghana leaves secondhand fridges out in bid to save energy | Global Development.  | Cultural Infusion | Scoop.it

Despite a government incentive scheme, many Ghanaians are unhappy about the introduction of a ban on used fridges, reports Afua Hirsch

Cultural Infusion's insight:

City Waste is seperating and scrapping old fridges under a rebate scheme which incentivises Ghainans to replace them with new ones for a subsidy. Since October 450 fridges have been processed with another 600 waiting to be collected, some are so old they are ommitting poisonous gases. 

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'Good girls don’t protest': report exposes attacks on Sudan's female activists

'Good girls don’t protest': report exposes attacks on Sudan's female activists | Cultural Infusion | Scoop.it
Human Rights Watch investigation finds rape, violence and arbitrary detention have become common weapons against women
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Not so lost in translation: How are words related?

Not so lost in translation: How are words related? | Cultural Infusion | Scoop.it
Some words have dramatically changed meaning throughout the ages. Awful once meant impressed or filled with awe, a clue was once a ball of yarn, and being called nice wasn't always a compliment, having once meant foolish, silly, or ignorant.

But how does a word's definition change so drastically? 

In an attempt to understand how words' meanings evolve, a team of scientists mapped out the relationships between different words and their meanings in a sort of linguistic snapshot, capturing the process in action.

Recommended:Are you scientifically literate? Take our quiz
If you've ever learned a new language or translated sentences from one language to another, you know that one word won't always translate perfectly into another. Some words even have multiple meanings, like the Hawaiian word aloha, which can mean both hello and goodbye.


TEST YOUR KNOWLEDGEAre you scientifically literate? Take our quiz

VIDEO The Last Speakers: Endangered Languages

PHOTOS OF THE DAY Photos of the day 02/03
The team of scientists used such words with multiple meanings, known as polysemous words, to create a semantic network, connecting words through these polysemous translations. The resulting web appears in a paper published Monday in the journal the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 

"We had no idea how to represent the relationship between words and meanings, let alone how the meanings of words change," study senior author Tanmoy Bhattacharya of the Santa Fe Institute tells The Christian Science Monitor in an interview. So they looked for patterns among words in different languages.

First the team selected 81 languages across the globe. These languages were chosen across diverse historical, cultural, and geographical contexts. 

"Most language studies are more focused on W.E.I.R.D. society, Western Educated, Industrialized, Rich, Democratic," study lead author Hyejin Youn, also of the Santa Fe Institute, tells the Monitor. But since the team was hunting for universal patterns, they chose languages that wouldn't have as much common ancestry or interaction. 

The scientists used English as a meta-language. They selected 22 simple nouns like sun, sea, dust, water, and stone to use for simple translation. "We wanted to start with basic things first," Dr. Youn says.

Each word was translated from English to each of the 81 languages. Then, the resulting word or words were translated back into English. During that back-translation, some of the words acquired multiple meanings. 

For example, Dr. Bhattacharya says, "You can start with the word sun" and end up with a whole bunch of words. "When you take these words and you translate them back, you get both sun and moon" in some languages.

This process of translation and back-translation ultimately produced a web of words. But not everything was strongly connected.

A web of the elements
"You can easily go from something like sun to something like star," Bhattacharya says. "But you'll be very hard-pressed to get to river."

When they looked at the data, the researchers found that the stronger links clustered words together into three major groupings. And these groupings line up somewhat with the classical elements of the natural world. Words relating to water formed one cluster while those linked to stone or mountain formed another. The third cluster was larger and encompassed multiple elements, connecting words such as dust with smoke, or sun with fire and wind.

"There seems to be universal structure across different languages in meanings at a certain level," Youn says. 

Words and meaning in motion
How does this web of translations and back-translations highlight how words change their meanings through time? It has to do with how words work.

"Words label concepts," Youn says. "We need a word to express ourselves, communicate with others, but what is actually being communicated is meaning."

And culture is constantly changing, so those groupings of letters we call words may be remarkably dynamic too.

"Our sense that words are static things sitting in the dictionary with a meaning – or even meanings – that sit still is artificial," Columbia University linguist John H. McWhorter, who was not associated with the study, tells the Monitor in an email. "Rather, a word is a process, always on its way to becoming a different one."

So when these researchers mapped words in a modern semantic network, they captured a freeze-frame of that dynamic process.

"Words don't just change meanings randomly – rather, implications hanging over a word gradually become what the word means," Dr. McWhorter says. For example, "SUN implies HEAT. In a language, one might talk about getting some 'sun' in the meaning of warming up. After a while, in that language the word SUN may actually mean nothing but HEAT, something that would happen step by step, under the radar."

But during that process, "there's a time in the middle where a word has to mean both things," Bhattacharya explains. The goal of this research was to provide a model to use to ask questions about how words and their meanings change over time.

What's behind linguistic shifts and patterns?
The researchers looked at languages across far-flung regions, cultures and environments, thinking they might spot relationships between populations' experiences and their use of language. In that case, coastal populations would link the sea and salt while desert dwellers might not make that connection. But they found that that association was universal.

"There is a coherent conceptual space of meaning that transcends cultural and environmental factors," Youn says. 

In other words, language isn't strongly wedded to environment. 

"This study is showing that ... in all languages there are certain basic concepts despite how disparate human experience is, and that local culture is not the only thing shaping how a language works," McWhorter says.

Apps to help you speak and learn foreign languages
Clark Howard

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Photographer Continues Quest to Document the Diversity of Beauty Around the World

Photographer Continues Quest to Document the Diversity of Beauty Around the World | Cultural Infusion | Scoop.it
A year ago, we shared the incredible story of Mihaela Noroc—a photographer who quit her job, withdrew her savings, and embarked on a mission to captu…
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Being a Muslim in regional Australia

Being a Muslim in regional Australia | Cultural Infusion | Scoop.it
Four Muslims from Gippsland share their story of what it is like being a Muslim in regional Victoria.
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100-Year-Old Church Given New Life as Mesmerizing Skate Park with Vibrant Murals

100-Year-Old Church Given New Life as Mesmerizing Skate Park with Vibrant Murals | Cultural Infusion | Scoop.it
Okuda San Miguel (aka Okudart) has transformed a historic church in Llanera, Spain into a colorful haven for skateboarders. Created in collaboration…
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Caring to Dance | Pro Bono Australia

Caring to Dance | Pro Bono Australia | Cultural Infusion | Scoop.it
Faced with the realities of reduced government and philanthropic grants, and increased competition among Not for Profits for funding, Kumari Middleton found a sustainable solution for her dance organisation's financial challenges, writes Ellie Cooper in this week’s Spotlight on Social Enterprise.
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Cultural Infusion's curator insight, December 15, 2015 10:14 PM

Thanks very much to Ellie for her feature on our new social enterprise CARE TWO DANCE!

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Proud Aboriginal elder dances with granddaughter at graduation

Proud Aboriginal elder dances with granddaughter at graduation | Cultural Infusion | Scoop.it
Aboriginal elder Gali Yalkarriwuy Gurruwiwi has travelled from a remote island in north-east Arnhem Land to Victoria, to perform a special dance with his granddaughter.
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Inkrewsive Experience.

Inkrewsive Experience. | Cultural Infusion | Scoop.it

Read a first hand account of an international intern within Cultural Infusions' first hand experience of the Inkrewsive Dance Exhibit.  

Cultural Infusion's insight:

Hi, my name is Thalien, a 23 year old Dutch girl and an intern at Cultural Infusion.

Kumari asked me to join Inkrewsive every Wednesday and to write about some of my experiences with Inkrewsive and what I have learnt.

 

Imagine entering a dance studio and seeing a group of male and female dancers hard at work creating a dance battle, moving gracefully to the music of deejay Marnix. Or perhaps the dancers are tapping their toes, stretching their arms and smiling the best they can. Concentration and joy fill the studio, yet for many of the participants this is their first experience in a dance class with disabilities, primary school kids and teachers all in once. 

 

The performance made me so happy because I saw everyone laughing and trying to do their best because they get an opportunity to show their talents. In the beginning, some people where shy and lacked in confidence. During the time with Inkrewsive they learnt not only new dance skills and to dance together but also how to communicate. It was good to learn and meet different people. It really impacted a lot of participants and the performance is very inspiring for them. I enjoyed Inkrewsive so much because I feel like my soul is happy, it was really one of the best experiences I have had. 

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Mother's Market: The Indian bazaar run entirely by women.

Mother's Market: The Indian bazaar run entirely by women. | Cultural Infusion | Scoop.it

The thousands of stalls are run by women, selling everything from fruits and vegetables to colourful garments and handmade jewellery. The 'Mother's Market" is perhaps the only one of its' kind in Asia. 

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From India, with love: cultural appropriation and 50 years of Light on Yoga

From India, with love: cultural appropriation and 50 years of Light on Yoga | Cultural Infusion | Scoop.it
Does yoga in the West constitute cultural appropriation? We talk culture, pride and 50 years of Light on Yoga.
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Historic images show Native American way of life.

Historic images show Native American way of life. | Cultural Infusion | Scoop.it
Christopher Cardozo has the largest collection of Edward S. Curtis prints. Curtis spent nearly three decades documenting Native Americans in the early 1900s.
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