Cultural Geography
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GeoSettr

GeoSettr | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it

In May 2013, GeoGuessr came online and quickly became a favorite quiz game of geo-enthusiasts.  Using 5 random locations in Google Street View.  The game player can search the area in Street View and then make a guess as to where it is on the map.  Using GeoSettr, you can create your own GeoGuessr challenge by choosing five locations on Google Street View.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 30, 9:23 AM

You can customize your own GeoGuessr quizzes now, as others pan and zoom in the StreetView to explore the landscape you selected and find more context clues as to where that location is.  Try my sample quiz that I made based on these 5 clues.   

  1. The best place to get clam cakes and doughboys in RI
  2. My hometown is home to this center of athletic excellence
  3. This monument was a part of my research in this Latin American city
  4. This is where I went to school to get my Ph.D.
  5. Home to the movie “Close Encounters,” this National Monument has always fascinated me.  

Tags: landscape, place, trivia.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, February 27, 6:34 AM

another great tool - create your own Geoguesser games

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Kazakhstan to switch from Cyrillic to Latin alphabet

Kazakhstan to switch from Cyrillic to Latin alphabet | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it

"Kazakh was written in Arabic script until 1920 when it was substituted by the Latin alphabet. In 1940, it was replaced by a Cyrillic one. 'Given that over 100 countries in the world use the Latin script, it is crucial for Kazakhstan's integration into the global educational and economic environment,' said Gulnar Karbozova.

The former Soviet Republic declared independence in 1991. Its state language is Kazakh, a member of the Turkic family.

Yet, Russian is widely spoken across Kazakhstan and is its second official language."


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brielle blais's curator insight, April 1, 2:18 PM
This showcases how important a countries language is. It allows the country, in this case Kazakhstan, to have their own sort of identity, which can be seen in having extra letters in their alphabet that are certain Kazakh sounds. However, is it also important to be on the same grounds as other countries, many using the latin alphabet, because it makes the economic environment and education situations easier which other countries. 
othni lindor's curator insight, October 20, 3:29 AM
This article talk about Kazakhstan's decision to switch from Cyrillic to Latin alphabet. Kazakhstan is the second official language in Russia. "Kazakh was written in Arabic script until 1920 when it was substituted by the Latin alphabet. In 1940, it was replaced by a Cyrillic one. The current Cyrillic alphabet consists of 42 characters - 33 characters of the Russian alphabet and nine characters for specific Kazakh sounds. The plan for the switch to Latin reportedly centers on an alphabet of 32 letters, with some specific sounds of the Kazakh language to be covered with the use of apostrophes." This change will take time for everyone to adjust and makes it harder for someone who is learning the language. The whole country will have to makes changes to adjust to the new alphabet. 
David Stiger's curator insight, Today, 3:52 PM
An outsider might think, why go to all the trouble of switching over to an entirely different alphabet? That seems like a daunting task and could be very tedious and time consuming for a population of 18 million people. Schools and education systems will probably be on the front lines in making the transition. The end of the article makes clear why they would go to all the effort to switch to a Latin-based alphabet. Over 100 other countries (out of 195 countries in the entire world) use a Latin-based alphabet and Kazakhstan wants to become closer and more integrated in this larger international system. By pulling away from a Cyrillic alphabet, Kazakhstan is cutting some of its ties with Russia. Kazakhstan sees greater opportunity by getting closer with the West. It also makes sense for the country because Uzbekistan and Azerbaijan have switched over to Latin-based alphabets with success. Kazakhstan knows its possible and historically, they have very few ties to Cyrillic because the Soviet Union forced them to give up Arabic in 1940. 
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Europe's Population Change (2001 to 2011)

Europe's Population Change (2001 to 2011) | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
The map provides a level of detail previously unavailable. It is the first ever to collect data published by all of Europe’s municipalities.

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Olivia Campanella's curator insight, October 1, 4:35 PM
Europe has been undergoing intense demographic change and this map is the first ever collect data published by Europe. How this map works:

The Dark Blue color shows average annual population fall of 2% or more

The Medium Blue shows the average annual population fall of between 1 and 2%

and Light Blue shows a fall of 1%. The areas in tan experienced no change at all.

Areas in Deep Red show a rise of 2% or more in population, while in areas of Medium Red (1-2%) and Pale Pink (1%).
K Rome's curator insight, October 6, 7:31 PM
Europe has been undergoing intense demographic change and this map is the first ever collect data published by Europe. How this map works:

The Dark Blue color shows average annual population fall of 2% or more

The Medium Blue shows the average annual population fall of between 1 and 2%

and Light Blue shows a fall of 1%. The areas in tan experienced no change at all.

Areas in Deep Red show a rise of 2% or more in population, while in areas of Medium Red (1-2%) and Pale Pink (1%).
othni lindor's curator insight, October 20, 2:45 AM
This article shows the population patterns of Europe between 2001 and 2011. Many cities have had a high rise in average annual population of 2 percent or more. This map also shows that there has been more migration in northwest Europe. Citizens have left certain cities in search of better job opportunities. The population in Germany is sparse except in Berlin. Spain has had a big drop in population overall. Many people living in more rural regions have moved to cities and many others are moving to coasts for retiring or downsizing.
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10 countries that desperately want people to have more sex

10 countries that desperately want people to have more sex | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
Roughly half the countries around the world experience low fertility rates, and some get pretty creative in how they encourage procreation.

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Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 2017 8:55 PM

While many countries have anti-natalist policies (policies to discourage more births), other countries with declining populations have pro-natalist policies in an attempt to increase fertility rates.  While not an exhaustive list, this list gives a few more examples that teachers can use to show how countries in stage 4 of the demographic transition are dealing with declining fertility rates.  

 

 

Tags: declining populations, population, demographic transition model, modelsunit 2 population. 

Ms. Amanda Fairchild's curator insight, October 16, 2017 1:21 PM
Examples of pro-natalist countries.
Frances Meetze's curator insight, September 10, 1:18 PM
Population

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Infographic: North Korea by the Numbers

Infographic: North Korea by the Numbers | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it

North Korea – a country hard to illustrate by numbers and those available are based on estimates. Accordingly, this graphic intends to give an overview on relevant aspects of a country hardly known by outsiders. Overall, we know little about the isolated northern part of the Korean peninsula and what we know is mostly disturbing: The DPRK’s government headed by Kim Jong-un has recently launched another missile test, adding up to 14 tests only in 2017.

Besides that, the country is estimated to be among the most militarised on the globe with more than a million active soldiers and an air force counting 944 aircrafts in total. Thus, North Korea is ranked 23rd (out of 133 countries) for military spending which approximately amounts to $7.5 billion per year. According to the CIA, young adults are obliged to spend several years in the military service, women around seven and men even ten years.

But above all, North Korea is a country that is desperately poor. Out of an estimated 25,115,311 inhabitants, only 36 percent of the population has access to electricity and the GDP per capita amounts to $1,700 – similar to that of South Sudan.

 

Tags: North Korea, infographic.


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Christopher L. Story's curator insight, August 12, 2017 11:50 AM
'cause you know....Venezuela.  
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2017 7:53 PM
Political geography: global challenges
Richard Aitchison's curator insight, March 29, 10:04 AM
North Korea is constantly in the news, but do we really know much about it. Before the US conflicts with Afghanistan and Iraq we all never very little about those countries. While we have had past history with North Korea, it is always good to understand the country and the people in the conflict. This is an easy info graphic to view and gives you simple knowledge on the country such as population, workforce number, military numbers, and other useful numbers that can be discussed.  As shown in the numbers military spending and military service time is a high priority which should not be a shocker if you ever turn on the news. However, one should also see that North Korea is a very poor country and most live in poverty. Very few have access to electricity and living conditions are not up to standards. So we can ask ourselves are the North Koreans spending money wisely? Well from this graphic probably not. We can begin to understand some of the issues (although there so many) with this country and why it can be a problem to the US and to the world.  A country basically run by a dictatorship with high military spending and a very high poverty rate is unacceptable. It would be fun to use other graphics on this page to begin to understand other countries as well, a good website to view. 
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In the Same Ballpark

In the Same Ballpark | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it

"In 1992, the Baltimore Orioles opened their baseball season at a brand new stadium called Oriole Park at Camden Yards, right along the downtown harbor. The stadium was small and intimate, built with brick and iron trusses—a throwback to the classic ballparks from the early 20th century. It was popular right from the start.

These new Populous ballparks are small and old fashioned-looking but they also feature modern amenities—comfortable seats and fancy foods. And while designed to be different, they tend to follow a similar aesthetic format, featuring a lot red brick and green-painted iron. These new parks also feature asymmetrical playing fields, which are in many cases dictated by the surrounding cityscape."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 12, 2017 5:08 PM

This podcast is filled with important urban geographic issues: downtown revitalization, landscape aesthetics, sense of place, planning, public/private revitalization, etc.  And to boot, this podcast uses America's pasttime to discuss these topics. I typically really enjoy the thoughtful exploration of the untold stories that make up our world found in the 99 Percent Invisible podcast.

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Making cities sustainable with urban agriculture

Making cities sustainable with urban agriculture | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
To reduce the pressure on the world's productive land and to help assure long-term food security, writes Herbert Girardet, city people are well advised to revive urban or peri-urban agriculture. While large cities will always have to import some food, local food growing is a key component of sustainable urban living.

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Matt Le Lacheur's curator insight, May 14, 2017 7:29 PM

This article links well with my Authentic Learning post on my blog http://mattgdlt.weebly.com/the-whiteboard.html . A unit of work could easily be designed around the concept of sustainable food in an urban environment. The topic links in to the year 9 content descriptor (ACSSU176) under Science Understanding Biological Science.

M Sullivan's curator insight, August 28, 2017 8:48 AM
Urban farming - an important factor in making megacities sustainable.
Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 2017 9:02 PM

Urban agriculture is right at the perfect intersection for human geographers who focus on both urban networks and food systems--clearly this is an important overlap that deserves a more detailed look. 

 

Tags: food, consumption, sustainability, socioeconomic, food desert, food, urban, unit 5 agriculture

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Why geography matters for students now more than ever

Why geography matters for students now more than ever | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
Students need to know human geography; they need to understand the relationships that exist between cultures.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 5, 2017 11:30 AM

This is more example of me preaching to the choir, but I hope that this will arm you with resources to use in discussions with administrators and colleagues in the fight against geographic ignorance.  This is a great article to put into my new tag of article that discuss why geography matters.   

 

Tagseducation, K12geography education, geography matters.

Brandon Fourie's curator insight, May 23, 2017 5:58 AM
Very interesting read! 
Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 5, 2017 12:13 PM

This is one more example of me preaching to the choir, but I hope that this will arm you with resources to use in discussions with administrators and colleagues in the fight against geographic ignorance.  This is a great article to put into my new tag of article that discuss why geography matters.   

 

Tagseducation, K12geography education, geography matters.

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Why do women live longer than men?

Why do women live longer than men? | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
Despite the social inequality women experience, they live longer than men. This is the case without a single exception, in all countries.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 5, 2017 1:30 PM

The question “why do women live longer than men?” is both biological and cultural.  This means that 1) gender as a cultural construct that influences behavior is a mitigating factor and 2) sex, as a biochemical issue, is a separate set of determining factors.  Estrogen benefits women because it lowers “bad” cholesterol) and “good” cholesterol, but testosterone does the opposite.  Women are more likely to have chronic diseases, but non-fatal chronic disease, but men are more prone to the more fatal chronic illnesses.  For the cultural reasons, men are less likely to seek treatment, adhere to the prescribed treatment, commit suicide, and engage in more risky behavior.  While these may read like a list of gendered stereotypes that don’t apply to all, when looking at the global data sets, these trends hold  and are more likely to be true.  How masculinity and femininity is constructed certainly shapes many of these factors and deserves some discussion. 

 

Tags: culture, population, mortality, development, cultural norms, statisticsgender

Frances Meetze's curator insight, September 10, 1:20 PM
population
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Syria's war: Who is fighting and why [Updated]

"After four-plus years of fighting, Syria's war has killed at least hundreds of thousands of people and displaced millions. And, though it started as a civil war, it's become much more than that. It's a proxy war that has divided much of the Middle East, and has drawn in both Russia and the United States. To understand how Syria got to this place, it helps to start at the beginning and watch it unfold."


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James Piccolino's curator insight, March 24, 9:10 AM
I remember seeing this one in class, but it makes little more sense now than it did then. The longer this conflict goes on, the more complex the web of alliances and enemies gets. How many more can be drawn into this war? What can stop the war? It seems as time goes on there are less answers and more bloodshed.
Nicole Canova's curator insight, March 24, 9:11 PM
This video is extremely helpful in understanding the conflict in Syria.  It provides a timeline of events, from the Arab Spring movement that ignited the conflict in 2011 to the present day.  The video discusses internal, regional, and global factors that have influenced the conflict, including how extremism and a complex web of alliances has muddied the waters of this war.
Matt Manish's curator insight, May 3, 8:53 PM
The Syrian war started in 2011 when Bashar al-Assad made an attack against the peaceful protesters. It was when the protestors started shooting back that the civil war started. Those protesters we’re also joined by some Syrian troops who became the Free Syrian Army. Extremist then start traveling to Syria to join the Rebels. The USA assigns a secret order to use the CIA to train the Rebels to fight against Assad. Assad response by using chemical weapons against the Rebels, which cause the USA to almost bomb Assad. It was in 2014 that an Al-Qaeda affiliate breaks off from Assad, due to internal disagreements, and forms the Islamic State of Iraq (better known as ISIS). The US starts bombing ISIS, and not Assad. Which shows that America opposes ISIS more than Assad. This becomes confusing, because the US sees ISIS as its main enemy, when ISIS has its focus on other priorities. Later, Donald Trump wins the election and vows to stay out of Syria. Assad then bombs his own people again, and the US responds by bombing an Assad Air Base in Syria. This was the first time the US attacked the Assad regime.
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Hijab: Veiled in Controversy

Hijab: Veiled in Controversy | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
Hijab is an Islamic concept of modesty and privacy, most notably expressed in women’s clothing that covers most of the body.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, March 25, 2017 9:43 PM

Migration raises issues of cultural acceptance and integration 

Taylor Doonan's curator insight, March 23, 12:42 PM
This article is about Hijabs and it talks about the religious aspect of Hijabs versus the cultural aspect. It states that the hijab is a sign of modesty, which is not a strictly Muslim ideology, but is addressed in many religions. It also talks about how the hijab is not directly mentioned in the Quran. It states that the hijab is almost as much a cultural symbol instead of a religious one and talks about countries with laws about hijabs and how women should dress. 
Nicole Canova's curator insight, March 24, 9:19 PM
Hijab is the expression of a concept of modesty.  It is not specific to one religion, nor is it specific to one region.  This expression of modesty is encouraged, but not clearly defined, in Islam's holy texts; rather, it is informed by personal or cultural notions of what it means to be modest.  Hijab's association with extreme or radical Islam has led to heated debates in Western nations about whether or not it is acceptable for people to express hijab, with many people citing "national/public security" as a reason to ban certain coverings.
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The global food waste scandal

Western countries throw out nearly half of their food, not because it's inedible -- but because it doesn't look appealing. Tristram Stuart delves into the shocking data of wasted food, calling for a more responsible use of global resources.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 14, 2017 2:57 PM

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions in a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates. 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, TED, video, unit 5 agriculture.

Sabrina Ortiz's curator insight, March 5, 2017 7:29 PM
My scoop it opinion piece was on global food waste. How globally food is thrown by the tons daily. Its audience is everyone and its purpose is to try to get people to open their eyes and waste less. America makes over four times the amount needed to feed its people. We are hurting the environment by making so much food that just go to waste. The purpose of this is to illustrate the huge issue we have with countries of people who don’t have food to begin with and here we are throwing away perfectly good food that could be use for these people or to feed pigs to make more meat. His exigence is all the food that could be use for other people or animals and its going to land fills daily. Its like a ticking time bomb hurting earth. His constraints are the laws set on food given to live stock in Europe and companies and the corporations that control the food. He urges people to use the amount of food they truly believe they will eat.
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10 Intriguing Photographs to Teach Close Reading and Visual Thinking Skills

10 Intriguing Photographs to Teach Close Reading and Visual Thinking Skills | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
We pair 10 photos from The Times that we’ve used in our weekly “What’s Going On in This Picture?” with ideas from students and teachers for how you can use them, or images like them, to teach close reading and visual thinking skills.

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Sarah's curator insight, June 4, 2017 8:06 PM
This is an excellent website that can be used as a resource for enhancing visual literacy, close reading and visual thinking skills, which are fundamental within the Arts. In the Arts, specifically Visual Arts and Media Arts, it is crucial to be able to read an image, and these photographs and resources within the link can be easily modified to create some simple exercises in reading the artworks. 
Anne-Marie Rocheleau's curator insight, August 19, 2017 11:19 AM

Faire des inférences; promouvoir la discussion

Alexandra Mápura's curator insight, October 21, 2017 8:27 PM
I like this article since it presents some interesting pictures to teach English. We can use it for making a great conversation (practicing speaking skills) about important social concerns.
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Why Somaliland is east Africa’s strongest democracy

Why Somaliland is east Africa’s strongest democracy | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it

"Though unrecognized by the international community, the country benefits from a strong social contract between government and citizens."

 

Drop a pin on a map of eastern Africa and chances are it will not land on a healthy democracy. Somalia and South Sudan are failed states. Sudan is a dictatorship, as are the police states of Eritrea, Rwanda and Ethiopia. In this context tiny Somaliland stands out. Somaliland was a British protectorate, before it merged with Italian Somalia in 1960 to form a unified Somalia. It broke away in 1991, and now has a strong sense of national identity. It was one of the few entities carved up by European colonists that actually made some sense. Somaliland is more socially homogeneous than Somalia or indeed most other African states (and greater homogeneity tends to mean higher levels of trust between citizens). For fear of encouraging other separatist movements in the region, the international community, following the African Union, has never obliged [to recognize Somaliland]. Nation-building on a shoestring helped keep Somaliland’s politicians relatively accountable, and helped to keep the delicate balance between clans.

 

Tags: devolution, political, states, sovereignty, autonomy, unit 4 political, Somalia, Africa.


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Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, March 30, 4:02 PM
(Africa) Somaliland, an universally unrecognized state in Somalia, recently held it's sixth peaceful election. Originally a British colony that then merged with Italian Somalia, Somaliland declared independence in 1991, leaving the rest of the war-torn and lawless country. Despite their constitution and pursuit of democracy, no other country will acknowledge their sovereignty to prevent other African separatist movements. Usually democratic reform in Africa comes from foreign aid but without external help citizens of Somaliland created a working representative system. Yet, like most of the continent, corruption and delayed elections poses a problem for the autonomous state, and it is hard to tell the future of the only democracy in east Africa.
Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, March 31, 6:14 PM
Although it is not recognized as its own country Somaliland is Somalia's strongest state. Surrounded by dictatorships, Somaliland built a strong state by creating a strong contract between the government the people. 
Douglas Vance's curator insight, April 21, 1:48 PM
Although plagued by many of the problems facing African democracies; corruption, abuse of power and delayed elections, Somaliland remains one of the bright spots of African democratic movements. The natural democratic development of the autonomous state within Somalia has been a prime example of how a relatively stable democracy can develop when people can trust the government and are left to their own means to form a free and open government.
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Somalia: The Forgotten Story

Part I: The story of Somalia's decline from stability to chaos and the problems facing its people at home and abroad.

Part II: The ongoing civil war has caused serious damage to Somalia's infrastructure and economy. Thousands of Somalis have either left as economic migrants or fled as refugees. Within Somali, more than a million people are internally displaced.

 

Tags: devolution, political, states, unit 4 political, migration, refugees, Somalia, Africa.


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The World's Most Efficient Languages

The World's Most Efficient Languages | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
How much do you really need to say to put a sentence together?
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Bogotá's weekly road closures for motorists are a boon for multi-use transportation activities

Bogotá's weekly road closures for motorists are a boon for multi-use transportation activities | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it

"Bogotá closes its roads every Sunday. Now everyone wants to do it. The Ciclovía is the world’s most successful mass recreation event."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 31, 2017 12:55 PM

The amount of physical space in our urban environments that is exclusively dedicated to vehicular transportation is staggeringly high; there are efforts in many cities to return the streets to a multi-use space that it was historically.  Bogotá is one of the leading cities in this movement and the Ciclovía is the envy of cyclists and runners around the world.  

 

Questions to Ponder: What are the benefits and drawbacks to a weekly closure of the roads to vehicular traffic?  Would this make a city a more desirable or less desirable place for you?  What stakeholders would financially harmed by this and which groups might find this profitable?  

 

TagsSouth America, Colombia, urban, planningtransportation, urbanism, .

M Sullivan's curator insight, August 25, 2017 5:06 AM
Could this be a way of making our growing cities more sustainable? 
Taylor Doonan's curator insight, February 13, 8:42 AM
This article shows how important consistency is. Bogota is holding events every Sunday where they close the streets to allow for physical activity in the form of bicycling, walking, running, skateboarding, etc. By doing this they have sparked worldwide interest. Bogota has massive numbers of people who participate every week and many of the people that participate say that they would not get the recommended amount of exercise if this event did not happen every week. This works wonderfully in Bogota, and that is in part due to consistency, this is where many cities struggle. Many of the other cities that were inspired by Bogota are not yet at the level where they can close roads for such a period every week as Bogota does. Another obstacle for other cities is the financial burden, Bogota has a large group of volunteers that are important to the success of the Ciclovia, whereas in many other cities they do not have the volunteer presence so it requires paying police officers overtime which is expensive. This causes many cities to not be able to have Ciclovias frequently which makes the outcomes less substantial. This is a great idea, but it needs to be executed well and the money and work needs to be put in in the beginning for the success to come.  
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In the Same Ballpark

In the Same Ballpark | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it

"In 1992, the Baltimore Orioles opened their baseball season at a brand new stadium called Oriole Park at Camden Yards, right along the downtown harbor. The stadium was small and intimate, built with brick and iron trusses—a throwback to the classic ballparks from the early 20th century. It was popular right from the start.

These new Populous ballparks are small and old fashioned-looking but they also feature modern amenities—comfortable seats and fancy foods. And while designed to be different, they tend to follow a similar aesthetic format, featuring a lot red brick and green-painted iron. These new parks also feature asymmetrical playing fields, which are in many cases dictated by the surrounding cityscape."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 12, 2017 5:08 PM

This podcast is filled with important urban geographic issues: downtown revitalization, landscape aesthetics, sense of place, planning, public/private revitalization, etc.  And to boot, this podcast uses America's pasttime to discuss these topics. I typically really enjoy the thoughtful exploration of the untold stories that make up our world found in the 99 Percent Invisible podcast.

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'This is death to the family': Japan's fertility crisis is creating economic and social woes never seen before

'This is death to the family': Japan's fertility crisis is creating economic and social woes never seen before | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
Shrinking GDP and a falling population are poised to turn Japan into what economists call a "demographic time bomb," and other countries could be next.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 20, 2017 10:34 PM

Preliminary HSc - Global challenges: Population

Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 2017 9:01 PM

The article headline is quite click-baity, but there is some real substance to this article.  The graphs are especially useful to teach concepts such as population momentum and the age-dependency ratio. These were the key parts of the article that caught my eye:

  • An aging population will mean higher costs for the government, a shortage of pension and social security-type funds, a shortage of people to care for the very aged, slow economic growth, and a shortage of young workers.
  • Following feminism's slow build in Japan since the 1970s, today's workers strive for equality between the sexes, something Japan's pyramid-style corporate structure just isn't built for. That's because institutional knowledge is viewed as a big deal in Japan.
  • The elderly now make up 27% of Japan's population. In the US, the rate is only 15%. Experts predict the ratio in Japan could rise to 40% by 2050. With that comes rising social-security costs, which the shrinking younger generations are expected to bear.
  • To make up for an aging population and aversion toward immigrant work, Japan's tech sector has stepped up its efforts in robotics and artificial intelligence.

Tags: culture, genderlabor, populationmigration, JapanEast Asia.

josiewern's curator insight, December 8, 2017 4:33 AM

unit 2 article 1              2

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The Incredible growth of megacities

The Incredible growth of megacities | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it

"The world’s cities are booming and their growth is changing the face of the planet. Around 77 million people are moving from rural to urban areas each year. The latest UN World Cities Report has found that the number of “megacities” – those with more than 10 million people – has more than doubled over the past two decades, from 14 in 1995 to 29 in 2016. And whereas the developed world was once the home of the biggest cities, this map shows that it is now the developing world taking the lead."

 

Tags: urban, megacities, regions.


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Carson Dean Williamson's curator insight, May 11, 2017 10:43 AM
This relates to our chapter by showing some facts on mega cities. Mega cities are metropolitan areas that have a high population. These cities are the definition of urban development around the world. There is currently 29 mega cities (since 2016) around the world. This article showed the growth of mega cities and urban development of the city.
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 19, 2017 10:25 AM
unit 7
Melih Pekyatirmaci's curator insight, May 20, 2017 7:31 PM
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Saudi Arabia unveils plans for 'entertainment city' near Riyadh

Saudi Arabia unveils plans for 'entertainment city' near Riyadh | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it

"The 334 sq km (129 sq mile) attraction - about the same as Las Vegas - will offer cultural, sporting and entertainment activities - including a Six Flags park and a safari park. The announcement boasts it will be the first of its kind in the world. Building will begin early next year and the first stage finished by 2022.

It forms part of a wider master plan. Vision 2030, announced by Deputy Crown Prince Mohammad Bin Salman a year ago, aims to diversify the economy and reduce the kingdom's reliance on oil, through a series of projects." 


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 10, 2017 4:00 PM

This brings up so many more questions than answers.  Is this geared to attract tourists from Saudi Arabia, the region, or possibly even international tourism?  Will the entertainment amenities be gender segregated as most public places in Saudi Arabia are?  Is the idea of an entertainment city in one part of the country going to be culturally compatible with a holy city on the other? 

 

Tagstourism, culture, religion, Middle East., Saudi Arabia, genderMiddle East.

James Piccolino's curator insight, March 24, 10:09 AM
I don't know if this is just me judging a culture without knowledge, but when I think Saudi Arabia, I do not think of entertainment, joy, and fun as the article puts it. This is more evidence of cultural outlooks than it is anything against the region. This city could also prove to be a turning point in their culture, and a larger embrace of westernization.
Taylor Doonan's curator insight, March 24, 4:34 PM
There are plans to build a giant entertainment city in Saudi Arabia, similar to Las Vegas. The question about building such a city in this region is the way women are treated in this region. Women must be covered at all times and cannot really go outside without a man, this would cause for an interesting dynamic in a city like this. It will be interesting to watch as it happens. 
Rescooped by Anna Hoppe from Geography Education
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The Most Popular Running Routes in the 20 Biggest U.S. Metro Areas

The Most Popular Running Routes in the 20 Biggest U.S. Metro Areas | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
These are the top running routes in the 20 biggest metro areas in the United States, according to Strava data.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 14, 2017 2:48 PM

I'm a big advocate of running/mapping apps for my own personal training (I use Map My Run and Strava).  These maps were created with raw data from Strava to show the most popular urban runs in the US.   Prominent on this list are urban parks, scenic waterfronts, and retrofitted railways...in other words, successful urban planning that has helped to foster a strong sense of place.

    

Tags: urban, place, neighborhood, planning, urbanism.

Scooped by Anna Hoppe
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What Is Culture Shock?

What Is Culture Shock? | Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
What is culture shock, and how do you know whether you suffer from it? InterNations shows you how to recognize culture shock symptoms and minimize the effects.
Anna Hoppe's insight:
Culture Shock
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