Education and Cultural Change
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Education and Cultural Change
How our culture is co-evolving with the algorithmic medium and the education is following this process
Curated by Pierre Levy
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Practicing the Principles of Connected Learning - DML Central @hrheingold interviews @dogtrax

Practicing the Principles of Connected Learning - DML Central @hrheingold interviews @dogtrax | Education and Cultural Change | Scoop.it
Howard Rheingold interviews Kevin Hodgson, an educator who embodies the principles of connected learning and the values of the open web.

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A framework for interaction and cognitive engagement in connectivist learning contexts

A framework for interaction and cognitive engagement in connectivist learning contexts | Education and Cultural Change | Scoop.it
A framework for interaction and cognitive engagement in connectivist learning contexts

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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, May 4, 2014 2:40 AM
Abstract

Interaction has always been highly valued in education, especially in distance education (Moore, 1989; Anderson, 2003; Chen, 2004a; Woo & Reeves, 2007; Wang, 2013; Conrad, in press). It has been associated with motivation (Mahle, 2011; Wen-chi, et al., 2011), persistence (Tello, 2007; Joo, Lim, & Kim, 2011), deep learning (Offir, et al., 2008) and other components of effective learning. With the development of interactive technologies, and related connectivism learning theories (Siemens, 2005a; Downes, 2005), interaction theory has expanded to include interactions not only with human actors, but also with machines and digital artifacts. This paper explores the characteristics and principles of connectivist learning in an increasingly open and connected age. A theory building methodology is used to create a new theoretical model which we hope can be used by researchers and practitioners to examine and support multiple types of effective educational interactions. Inspired by the hierarchical model for instructional interaction (HMII) (Chen, 2004b) in distance learning, a framework for interaction and cognitive engagement in connectivist learning contexts has been constructed. Based on cognitive engagement theories, the interaction of connectivist learning is divided into four levels: operation interactionwayfinding interaction,sensemaking interaction, and innovation interaction. Connectivist learning is thus a networking and recursive process of these four levels of interaction.

Alina Ghimpu-Hague's curator insight, May 8, 2014 5:24 AM

Aims to contribute to the construction of a more nuanced framework for connectivist practice by proposing a theoretical model that integrates two of connectivism's core concepts, Wayfinding Interaction and Sensemaking Interaction, with aspects of Bloom's revised taxonomy.

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Theory of Knowledge, Social Media and Connected Learning in High School | DMLcentral

Theory of Knowledge, Social Media and Connected Learning in High School | DMLcentral | Education and Cultural Change | Scoop.it
I’m an advocate of cultivating and tuning the network of people I follow on Twitter, a practice that includes my willingness to respond to those I didn’t previously know who solicit my attention by directing an @reply to my Twitter handle.
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Mlik Sahib's curator insight, March 26, 2014 4:58 PM

"The course unit guide focuses on a series of “big questions” students are prompted to ask rather than specific answers they are expected to learn. Social media —  blogs, Twitter, video, Storify, a Google+ community — are enlisted for specific purposes of inquiry, reflection, metacognition, mindful personal participation in the digital commons, collaboration and creative problem solving.

Burvall and her students apply the overarching question of the course — “how do we know what we know?” — to everything else they study from the natural sciences, social sciences, arts and humanities. She is an advocate of learning in public, not only to prepare students for taking control of their intellectual life online, but in order to enlist networks of others."

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George Siemens Gets Connected

George Siemens Gets Connected | Education and Cultural Change | Scoop.it
The developer of the first massive open online course sees value in learning through personal connections, just as members of his Mennonite community did when he was a child.
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Mooc creators criticise courses’ lack of creativity

Mooc creators criticise courses’ lack of creativity | Education and Cultural Change | Scoop.it
Original vision lost in scramble for profit and repackaging of old ideas, say pair

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Lance W. 's curator insight, October 18, 2013 5:01 PM

"...what he calls the 'biggest failing of the big Mooc providers': they are simply repackaging what is already known rather than encouraging creativity and innovation."

Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, October 19, 2013 1:09 AM

Stephen Downes' Full Article

Julie F's curator insight, November 3, 2013 5:25 AM

Pay attention to the piece of the anti-moocs information.

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New Pedagogies in Our Connected World by Nic Laycock and an Interview with Prof Steve Wheeler

New Pedagogies in Our Connected World by Nic  Laycock  and an Interview with Prof Steve Wheeler | Education and Cultural Change | Scoop.it

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Andreas Kuswara's curator insight, July 18, 2013 1:05 AM

"The implications are massive," says Steve. Like many futurists and learning theoreticians he believes hierarchies are dying. “We have exhausted and moved on from taxonomies. The bottom-up folksonomy has been explored, and we are now entering the rhizonomy, the un-organization (of which MOOCs are an example), chaotic, non-rule-based learning that happens regardless of organization.”

 

an interesting read indeed.

Andreas Kuswara's comment, July 18, 2013 1:34 AM
Of course these are changes or development or progresses that we are facing in education and technology in general, but IMHO they don't necessarily correlate, although one can influence the other.

e.g. the development of voice/gesture interfaces, is not driven by, nor drive the take up of participatory, social, community learning mode. They just happen to coincide with one another. I don't even think gesture interface can promote/encourage participatory/social/community learning mode. The use of keyboard can be sufficient to allow all of that. Of course there is some specific scenario, if “participatory” is understood as being immersive, and 3D holographic come into the picture, then we probably can't interact efficiently if we still use keyboard and mouse, thus gesture interface is needed. But the existence of such specific cases can’t justify generalization of the correlation.

I’m not sure about machine generated content, if it’s the automated curation that another human prepared (e.g. we subscribed to feed and classify them, or some algorithm somewhere silently look at what we read, and based on that pull what it thinks relevant to us and feed us), I would not label any of those as “machine generated”, we can say “machine curated” if we wish. The role of the machine simply as a matchmaker between a consumer (human) with the product (produced by other human), the machine enabled the consumption processes in the scale that is beyond our imagination before, but not actually generate it. there could be more spectacular examples of machine automating some or all processes to serve information to our plates.

So I agree with each of the trends independently, but not sure about putting them together as if they have correlation; however, there is a possibility (of course) to take advantage of the new development in technology and apply it in both old and new approach to learning then come up with a niche interesting innovation. But I think that the old pedagogies won't be going anywhere, although it can mutate into lots of niche variations.

Impact to teacher education: If we jump both feet to the “new pedagogy” and neglect to properly get our heads around the old as much as the new, we might disadvantage our students, as we know that "no one size fits all", not even the so called new pedagogies. IMHO pedagogy is interesting, where we can combine the ancient with the recent.
Ruth Obadia's curator insight, August 14, 2013 3:51 PM

New pedagogies are needed to align with the reality that our future visions are rapidly becoming our present” asserts Steve. “Our old ways of thinking will only make the brokenness of education and learning worse. We have to change, and change fast.”

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Connected Learning: A Learning Approach Designed for Our Times

Connected Learning: A Learning Approach Designed for Our Times | Education and Cultural Change | Scoop.it
What does connected learning look like in action? It looks like Charles Raben, a 14-year-old aspiring photographer from a public school in New York City.
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luiy's curator insight, May 16, 2013 1:19 PM

Aprendizaje para todas las edades,,, hacia la "brecha" generacional.

 

Connected Learning: Production-centered and Openly networked

In the summer of 2011, Charles vacationed with his father in Berlin. The young photographer was captivated by the city's art galleries and young innovative culture; so much so that he decided to enroll in a weekly German class at New York University the following summer.

 

En route to his first class, Charles caught sight of an "interesting fellow" operating the Astor Place newsstand. They struck up an unlikely conversation that deeply impacted Charles.

 

Jerry had been running his Astor Place newsstand for the past 25 years. The city of New York had recently stepped in, threatening to take away his license, based on a technicality.

 

Overcome by the man's plea for help, Charles rushed home and hopped on change.org. He'd signed petitions in the past in support of gay rights, wrongly charged criminals and the protection of wildlife. But he had never created one of his own.

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Connectivism in Education: some key-ideas [Infographic]

Connectivism in Education: some key-ideas [Infographic] | Education and Cultural Change | Scoop.it
Source: ht.lySee on Scoop.it - Pedagogía2.0

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Raquel Oliveira's curator insight, April 8, 2015 4:51 PM

um achado esse infografico que consolida os 8 principios do conectivismo. Para quem "ensina" alguem em algum momento, é uma rapida visão de como funcionamos.

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elearnspace › Personal Learner Knowledge Graph

elearnspace › Personal Learner Knowledge Graph | Education and Cultural Change | Scoop.it
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luiy's curator insight, May 6, 2014 5:04 PM

What is needed in education is something like a Personal Learner Knowledge Graph (PLKG): a clear profile of what a learner knows. It doesn’t matter where the learner learned things – work, volunteering, hobbies, personal interest, formal schooling, etc. What matters is that learners are aware of what they know and how this is related to the course content/curriculum. In a sense, PLKG is like the semantic web or Google Knowledge Graph: a connected model of learner knowledge that can be navigated and assessed and ultimately “verified” by some organization in order to give a degree or designation (or something like it).

 

If the education system can make the transition to learner knowledge graphs, instead of mainly content, the system can start to be far more intelligent than it currently is. For example, if I’m a student who spends summer months idly consuming beverages, I will develop a different skill set than someone who spent their summer volunteering and working (see video below for a discussion I had with Steve Paikin on the Agenda). Yet when the two of us start university in fall, the system normalizes our knowledge to the curriculum. We get the same content even though we are different people with completely different skills and knowledge.

Claude Emond's curator insight, May 7, 2014 9:20 AM

«The big shift that needs to be made in education is to shift from knowing content to knowing learners»

Fàtima Galan's curator insight, May 8, 2014 5:08 AM

"What is needed in education is something like a Personal Learner Knowledge Graph (PLKG): a clear profile of what a learner knows."

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Brainstorm in Progress: Connectivism, Neuroscience, and Education

Brainstorm in Progress: Connectivism, Neuroscience, and Education | Education and Cultural Change | Scoop.it

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Dany Malaver's curator insight, April 12, 2014 12:13 PM

es interesante conocer acerca del cerebro humano y sus funciones a profundidad, el conocimiento humano no tiene limites y menos en el campo de la ciencia y los avances 

Connie Anderson's curator insight, April 13, 2014 2:59 PM

Music, music, music!! I will trust the current researchers at two well-known universities. www.brainvolts.northwestern.edu/‎

Just look at all the most recent findings ranging all the way from pre-schoolers to the elderly. Let's read about their research, their conclusions, and then go practice our instruments of choice! :-)

Philippe-Didier Gauthier's curator insight, April 13, 2014 3:09 PM
#Apprenance Connectivism, Neuroscience, and EducationI have never been comfortable with proclamations by educators or scientists (and yes, there is a difference) about how the brain works..... (suite à lire sur le site..)
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Connected Learning: Harnessing the Information Age to Make Learning More Powerful

Connected Learning: Harnessing the Information Age to Make Learning More Powerful | Education and Cultural Change | Scoop.it

This report introduces connected learning, a promising educational approach that uses digital media to engage students’ interests and instill deeper learning skills, such as communication, collaboration, and critical thinking. The report lists four elements constituting connected learning’s emphasis on bridging school, popular culture, home, and the community to create an environment in which students engage in and take responsibility for their learning.


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Gust MEES's curator insight, November 8, 10:04 AM

This report introduces connected learning, a promising educational approach that uses digital media to engage students’ interests and instill deeper learning skills, such as communication, collaboration, and critical thinking. The report lists four elements constituting connected learning’s emphasis on bridging school, popular culture, home, and the community to create an environment in which students engage in and take responsibility for their learning.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Connected+Learning

 

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, November 9, 1:07 AM
Connected Learning: Harnessing the Information Age to Make Learning More Powerful
Rubiel's curator insight, November 20, 11:27 AM
This repport connects learning and digital media to engage students’ interests and instill deeper learning skills, such as communication, collaboration, and critical thinking. The report lists four elements constituting connected learning’s emphasis on bridging school, popular culture, home, and the community to create an environment in which students engage in and take responsibility for their learning.
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Dialogue and Connectivism: A new approach to understanding and promoting dialogue-rich networked learning

Dialogue and Connectivism: A new approach to understanding and promoting dialogue-rich networked learning | Education and Cultural Change | Scoop.it
Dialogue and connectivism: A new approach to understanding and promoting dialogue-rich networked learning

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, October 28, 2013 7:30 AM

Connectivism offers a theory of learning for the digital age that is usually understood as contrasting with traditional behaviourist, cognitivist, and constructivist approaches. This article will provide an original and significant development of this theory through arguing and demonstrating how it can benefit from social constructivist perspectives and a focus on dialogue. Similarly, I argue that we need to ask whether networked social media is, essentially, a new landscape for dialogue and therefore should be conceived and investigated based on this premise, through considering dialogue as the primary means to develop and exploit connections for learning. A key lever in this argument is the increasingly important requirement for greater criticality on the Internet in relation to our assessment and development of connections with people and resources. The open, participative, and social web actually requires a greater emphasis on higher order cognitive and social competencies that are realised predominantly through dialogue and discourse. Or, as Siemens (2004) implies, in his call to rethink the fundamental precepts of learning, we need to shift our focus to promoting core evaluative skills for flexible learning that will, for example, allow us to actuate the knowledge we need at the point that we need it. A corollary of this is the need to reorient educational experiences to ensure that we develop in our learners the ability “to think, reason, and analyse.” In considering how we can achieve these aims this article will review the principles of connectivism from a dialogue perspective; propose some social constructivist approaches, based on dialectic and dialogic dimensions of dialogue, which can act as levers in realising connectivist learning dialogue; demonstrate how dialogue games can link the discussed theories to the design and performance of networked dialogue processes; and consider the broader implications of this work for designing and delivering sociotechnical learning.

Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D.'s curator insight, October 28, 2013 1:27 PM
Ana Cristina Pratas's insight:

Connectivism offers a theory of learning for the digital age that is usually understood as contrasting with traditional behaviourist, cognitivist, and constructivist approaches. This article will provide an original and significant development of this theory through arguing and demonstrating how it can benefit from social constructivist perspectives and a focus on dialogue. Similarly, I argue that we need to ask whether networked social media is, essentially, a new landscape for dialogue and therefore should be conceived and investigated based on this premise, through considering dialogue as the primary means to develop and exploit connections for learning. A key lever in this argument is the increasingly important requirement for greater criticality on the Internet in relation to our assessment and development of connections with people and resources. The open, participative, and social web actually requires a greater emphasis on higher order cognitive and social competencies that are realised predominantly through dialogue and discourse. Or, as Siemens (2004) implies, in his call to rethink the fundamental precepts of learning, we need to shift our focus to promoting core evaluative skills for flexible learning that will, for example, allow us to actuate the knowledge we need at the point that we need it. A corollary of this is the need to reorient educational experiences to ensure that we develop in our learners the ability “to think, reason, and analyse.” In considering how we can achieve these aims this article will review the principles of connectivism from a dialogue perspective; propose some social constructivist approaches, based on dialectic and dialogic dimensions of dialogue, which can act as levers in realising connectivist learning dialogue; demonstrate how dialogue games can link the discussed theories to the design and performance of networked dialogue processes; and consider the broader implications of this work for designing and delivering sociotechnical learning.

Teacher Rose's curator insight, November 1, 2013 4:59 AM

Los latinos somos conectivistas por naturaleza. 

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Connectivism as a Digital Age Learning Theory

George Siemens and Stephen Downes developed a theory for the digital age, called connectivism, denouncing boundaries of behaviorism, cognitivism, and constructivism. Their proposed learning theory has issued a debate over whether it is a learning theory or instructional theory or merely a pedagogical view.


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Eva Ramos's curator insight, September 28, 2013 7:45 PM

I will have to include this in my Learning theories module, perhaps.

Lara N. Madden's curator insight, November 18, 2013 12:43 PM

This might be my new research topic. Very interesting.

Paige Paul's curator insight, September 15, 2015 7:52 PM

Topic 2- This is an interesting piece that explores how connectivism should be categorized.  Sometimes I think people in the education world can get too caught up in labels and buzzwords, and forget that ultimately what you call it doesn't matter as much as whether or not it promotes student learning.

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The Power of a Networked Teacher Illustrated

The Power of a Networked Teacher Illustrated | Education and Cultural Change | Scoop.it
A wonderful visual depiction of how educators can tap into their networks to expand and continually improve their teaching practice from a trove of rich resources. Illustrated by Langwitches, the image refers to Alec Couros’s original post exploring question, “What does the network mean to you?”

Via Anne Whaits
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Leslie Minton's curator insight, July 17, 2013 11:49 AM

Great visual of how networks are created to support how best to utilize them in education.

Josi Sierra's curator insight, July 18, 2013 5:36 PM

Conectados somos mas ;-)

Lara Strickland's curator insight, August 13, 2013 8:06 AM

Depicts exactly what I am exploring at the moment as part of my #H812 studies and MA in Online and Disctance Education.  Chosen however not to 'network' Facebook as I tend to use it socially rather than professionally.

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Shift_Learning: The 7 Most Powerful Idea Shifts In Learning Today

Shift_Learning: The 7 Most Powerful Idea Shifts In Learning Today | Education and Cultural Change | Scoop.it
So we're taking a stand here. This is all incredibly subjective, but so are the VH1 Top 100 Hair Bands Videos and those are fun,…
Pierre Levy's insight:

The good news is, many of the elements of a progressive learning environment—e.g., digital literacy, connectivism, and play—conveniently, and not coincidentally, work together. And better yet, collectively they can reduce the burden on those managing the learning because they place the learner at the center.

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Yolande Villemaire's curator insight, March 20, 2013 12:03 AM

A natural consequence of digital and social media, transparency is the opposite of closed, traditional schooling, where the walls of the classroom are tick and the local teachers and policies govern, judge, and process everything.